Wittmann Alder Wittmann Militaria 1st & 2nd Model Naval (Kriegsmarine) Dagger Section
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The German Navy or Kriegsmarine officially carried daggers as early as the 1840's and continued to wear edged weapons throughout the Third Reich Period. Most collectors are concerned with 3rd Reich Naval Dirks which are referred to as 1st and 2nd Model Naval Patterns.

Naval dirks were normally produced of gilded brass fittings and scabbard, with white grip and bright blade often having nautical theme etchings. The scabbard was produced with a engraved lighting bolt pattern or had a hammered finish. The so-called 1st Model, actually a Model 1929, was equipped with a round pommel top. After 1938, Naval Dirks received a pommel change which depicted a closed-winged eagle which clutched a wreathed swastika. These dirks are often found with a portepee, i.e. a decorative tassel wrapped about the grip.

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NAVAL #35930 2nd Model Naval Dagger with Orange Grip, Hammered Scabbard and Sailing Ship Blade – WKC

This outstanding WKC Naval Dagger has it all! It is the desirable piece that has the orange grip, hammered scabbard and sailing ship blade. The dagger looks identical to the example I show in color in my Navy Book on page 366 except it is even better. The dagger is also equipped with its original-to-the-piece unfrayed heavily toned silver knot still being in the original double reef tie. In addition, the pommel is one of the beautiful 1938 “change-over” pommels being the same as is shown on page 229. This impressive pommel has most of the original gilt still in all of the recesses showing only modest wear on the outside and the extended areas. The eagle looks to the viewer’s left with a very stern face having great detail to his eye, beak, breast feathering, half open wings, talons, wreath and mobile swastika. You will not see a better looking pommel. The crossguard is a textbook WKC. It features the fouled anchor center panels with oak leaves in relief on the crossguard arms. The quillons are the engraved button type with small nipples at the end. The grip is an outstanding pumpkin color orange, being a solid celluloid variety and being in perfect condition. This grip is tightly wrapped with twisted gilded brass wire.

As mentioned above, this outstanding naval dagger is equipped with the original toned silver portepee. This portepee is the thicker cord variety and shows no fraying anywhere and is set in place in the double reef knot tie. The stem and slide have the bullion “V” weave and the ball is covered with yarn-like bullion having the “cat’s anus” style stuffing. Overall, a wonderful hilt here rarely seen today.

The scabbard is an outstanding straight hammered finish variety. Much of the original gilt remains throughout this scabbard being at about 70-880%. The scabbard has the high off the surface style bands featuring overlapping oak leaves and acorns. The eyelets, in the WKC style, are engraved with oak leaves on the surfaces. The throat is retained by two dome head brass screws which are unturned. A very fine scabbard here.

The blade, as mentioned above is the sailing ship variety. We do not see the sailing ship motif blade used much on WKC as after about 1938 this firm used mostly fouled anchor style blades. This blade is nice and bright throughout having quality nickel-plated finish. The needle tip is still there and all of the frosted backgrounds are in place highlighting this great etch. The obverse depicts a fouled anchor in the center with a fully rigged sailing ship below. The ship is positioned on waves of floral designs. The upper etch finishes with floral devices. The reverse blade also features the sailing ship but eliminates the fouled anchor. Above and below the ship are floral motif.

The obverse ricasso is deeply stamped with the knighthead trademark and below is the firm’s initials, “WKC”. I notice that there is a little bit of double stamping here but most likely the original craftsman got nervous as he was looking at the beauty of this blade – this is not something to be concerned with as we often see double hits. The original off-red felt washer is in place showing only modest wear around the edges. If you are looking to highlight your naval collection this particular motif is most popular with collectors. The prices on this motif have steadily climbed over the years and I’m sure a dagger like this in this condition will continue to escalate in value. A wonderful gift for yourself and your 401K plan!

Near Mint. $2,495.00

NAVAL #35929 2nd Model Naval Dagger – Carl Eickhorn

This Carl Eickhorn piece is in excellent overall condition except for the fact that there is a crack on the left and the right side of the upper rib of the grip. When we acquired this dagger the pommel area had been bent backwards at the tang which apparently caused the crack. We have since fixed the problem but unfortunately the two cracks can not be repaired. At any rate, the dagger is priced accordingly and frankly it is a really nice piece here other than these two flaws.

The quality brass mounts are textbook Eickhorn throughout. The pommel and crossguard are the same as I show on page 263 and 265 of my Navy Book. Both of these mounts have excellent gilded surfaces being at least 90%. The pommel has fine detail to the eagle top. The fine detail to the eagle’s head, breast feathering, half open wings, talons, wreath and mobile swastika. The crossguard is also an outstanding example featuring fouled anchor center blocks with acanthus leaves engraved on each of the quillon arms. The quillon ends have the usual engraved lines with nipples that stick out slightly. The grip is a celluloid over carved wood base. As mentioned above there is a crack at both sides of the upper rib but the rest of the grip is in excellent condition having nice age toning. The cracks will not get any worse as the grip is heavily secured with very tight twisted brass wire. This wire has trapped years of residue between the ribs and speaks somewhat of the dagger’s history.

Wrapped about the hilt is the original-to-the-piece aluminum portepee. This portepee is the thicker cord style and remains in excellent condition still being in the double reef knot tie. This portepee has never been off the dagger and shows little to no fraying. The slide and stem have the bullion “V” weave designs and the lower ball is covered with yarn-like bullion. The insert at the bottom is the “cat’s anus” style.

The lightning bolt scabbard had a dent in the rear towards the bottom and we were able to successfully remove this dent although there is a small telltale line where it was. The scabbard features the lightning bolt motif having palmettes above and below the bands, with lightning bolts, ermine feet and acanthus leaves at the lower area. This scabbard is the same as the example shown on page 266, lower. The bands have the overlapping oak leaves with acorns and the eyelets have the triple serrated surfaces showing only modest wear. The throat is retained by two dome head brass screws which are unturned.

The outstanding double etched blade is the fouled anchor variety. The nickel-plated surfaces are in terrific condition and the tip is still needlelike. The fouled anchor etch is enhanced by 100% preservation to the gray backgrounds. This blade is in full mint condition. The reverse ricasso is stamped with the 1935-41 trademark. It features a seated squirrel looking to the left retaining a downward pointing sword. Above the squirrel is the quality word, “original” and below, is the firm’s name and location, “Eickhorn Solingen”. The original tan felt blade buffer is in place showing little to no wear.

A very nice dagger here which would sell for $300-$400 more than the asking price because of the cracked grip. A real bargain here for someone who can live with this small flaw.

Excellent. $1,095.00(#032414)

NAVAL #35793C 2nd Model Naval Dagger with Hammered Scabbard – E. & F. Hörster

This Hörster naval dagger is a very fine example showing some period wear but overall really great preservation. This piece is equipped with textbook fine brass mounts. The hilt mounts are the same as I show on page 283 and 282 of my Navy Book. The pommel does not have any gilt left to its surfaces but still retains very crisp detail to the bird’s head with great preservation to the bird’s eye, beak and breast feathers. The bird grasps a wreath in his well detailed talons which portrays a mobile swastika within. The crossguard has more gilt remaining to its surfaces being about 85-90%. This crossguard is identical to page 283. It features excellent fouled anchors on the two center blocks with well detailed acanthus leaves on the surfaces of both sides of the two quillon arms. The button ends have good cut in lines with long nipples that stuck out exactly as the book piece. The grip is a beautiful off-white celluloid over a carved wood base. This celluloid has turned about as dark as they do and therefore has a great classic look to it. The grip is in perfect condition and is tightly wrapped with twisted brass wire. It is easy to see the years of service time trapped within the ribs by the grip wire. I always like to see this on a Naval Dagger.

There is an aluminum portepee attached to this dagger which appears original-to-the-piece. This portepee is in excellent condition having a minor amount of fray just where it comes out of the naval double reef tie. Other than this the knot is in good condition. The slide and stem have the usual “V” woven designs with yarn-like bullion covering the ball with a smooth style bullion insert. A very nice hilt here.

The scabbard is also an impressive example being straight throughout and also having maybe 80-85% of the gilt. This scabbard has the extra cost peened surface. The scabbard bands are high off the surface type having excellent detail to the overlapping oak leaves and acorns. The eyelets on this piece are the larger size that we frequently see used on Hörster daggers. These eyelets are the same as the examples I show on page 284 top left. The eyelets have a sleeve on both of the edges of the opening and have good triple serrated surfaces. The throat is a neat looking example cantilevering on both sides matching the same width of the butt plate. This throat is retained by two brass dome head screws which are unturned. Attached to the ringlets are the remnants of the original hangers. The two aluminum Kriegsmarine gilded snaps are still attached but have been separated from the hardware which mounted them to the snaps. Probably this was done by the liberating veteran so that he wouldn’t have to carry home the bulk of these two straps.

The blade of this example is a real beauty being a fouled anchor style double etched motif. This blade retains its needlelike tip and has 100% of its original plated surfaces. The bright surfaces contrast nicely with the 100% gray backgrounds of the etch. These backgrounds show off the etch very nicely on this blade. This blade is in mint condition. The obverse ricasso is etched with the double oval trademark. The ovals contain the firm’s name and location, “E&F Hörster Solingen”. In the center is the large “H” letter which has a smaller “H” over an “S” in the middle being pierced by a sword. The brown leather blade buffer is in position. A very fine Hörster Naval Dagger here.

Excellent Plus, Plus. $1,595.00

NAVAL #35756 2nd Model Naval Dagger – Paul Weyersberg

Weyersberg produced Naval Daggers are quite scarce and this particular example is in excellent condition being a textbook model. The pommel and crossguard are identical to the examples that I show on page 293 of my Navy Book. Best not to look at the pommel shown on page 291, as this is not a Weyersberg pommel but rather is an Eickhorn. It was a mistake on my part and if I reprint the book you can be sure that I will replace this pommel with the correct Weyersberg type. At any rate, the pommel and crossguard are produced of fine cast mounts. This pommel has a slightly longer eagle head than most and has excellent detail to the bird’s eye, beak and breast feathering. The half open wing feathering, talons, wreath and raised mobile swastika are also excellent. The crossguard depicts the fouled anchors on both of the center blocks with good acanthus leaves. The button ends have excellent cut in lines with fairly long nipples that stick out in the center. The grip of this piece is a carved wood covered with white celluloid. The celluloid has toned nicely and it is in perfect condition throughout. This grip is tightly wrapped with twisted brass wire.

The scabbard of this example is a lightning bolt type. This scabbard is dent free and has excellent stampings to the palmettes and also to the lower lightning bolts, ermine feet and acanthus leaves. This scabbard is the same as I show on page 292, lower. The bands are identical to what is shown in the center picture on page 292. These bands depict highly detailed overlapping oak leaves and acorns. The eyelets have triple serrated surfaces showing a little bit of modest wear. There is also wear in the clearance hole caused by the carrying ring with its weight up against the inner eyelet. This kind of thing really talks to you. This dagger was obviously worn and saw service during World War II. The throat is retained by two brass headless side screws this is also identical to page 292.

The double etched blade is a nice example. This blade has quality nickel-plated surfaces with needlelike tip. The gray backgrounds are 100% showing off the fine fouled anchor etch. This blade remains in mint condition and is a beauty. The obverse ricasso is etched with the double ovals used by this firm. The ovals contain the firm’s name and location, “Paul Weyersberg & Co. Solingen”. Inside is a downward pointing sword placed between two wheat shafts. The original brown leather blade buffer is in place. A rarely seen Weyersberg naval dirk and an excellent collectible example if you are collecting naval maker “types”.

Excellent Plus, Plus. $1,495.00

NAVAL #35602 U-9 2nd Model Naval Dagger – Unmarked Robert Klass

This 2nd Model Naval Dagger shows some usage from the period, and about 40% of the gilding remains to be seen, mostly in the recesses of the mounts. The mounts of this basically are the same I show in my Navy Book on page 355. Although this blade is unmarked it is most like the work of the Klass firm, as they were the only known producer of the U-9 motif.

The pommel and crossguard are both in excellent condition, having fine detail throughout. The pommel bears an eagle, looking to the viewer's left, with fine detail evident to the eye, beak, and half-opened wings. The bird clutches a wreath with a raised mobile swastika in his talons.

The crossguard features the fouled anchor on both sides of the center block, and has acanthus leaves that decorate the crossguards. The guards have button-style ends, with nipples at the extremities. The detail is good throughout the guard. The grip is a carved wood base, with an off-white celluloid covering. The celluloid is is a excellent condition throughout, with no cracks or breaks, and is tightly wrapped with twisted brass wire.

There is a fine, Naval-style aluminum portepee tied about the hilt in a double reef knot. This knot shows no fraying and is in perfect condition throughout. The slide and stem have the “V” woven decoration, and the lower ball has the characteristic “cat's anus” style thread stuffing. A fine hilt here.

The scabbard is the standard lightning bolt style, and is nice and straight throughout. The shell has good, strong motif stampings, featuring palmettes around the carrying bands, and crisp lightning bolts, ermine feet, and acanthus leaves adorning the lower areas. The bands are the “high-off-the-surface” variety, featuring a mix of acorns and overlapping oak leaves. The eyelets are the triple serrated type. The upper eyelet shows a little more wear than the lower eyelet, but the serrations are still all there. The throat of this example is retained by two flush-mount headless screws, one in each side.

The main attraction of this dagger is of course the blade. The blade obverse is identical to the Klass examples I show on page 365 and 357 of my Navy Book, however the etched motif is opposite the of example shown in the book. The reverse blade depicts, in a lower panel, a battleship heading dead ahead, almost directly at the viewer. The details are quite clear to the bow and superstructure of the ship, as well as to the two ensigns which are flying from the bow and the mast. The battleship is cutting through the water, throwing up a fine bow wake. Above this depiction is the fouled anchor motif, and finishing the blade off are a series of floral decorations. The obverse blade has a larger panel which depicts the U-9 submarine. The details to this submarine are extremely clear, having the designation “U-9” on the conning tower. The antenna rigging of the submarine is extremely clear, and the periscope is also visible jutting out of the conning tower. The submarine is running on the surface, cutting through the sea, with three seagulls following above and astern. The etch is extremely clear and in perfect condition. Above this panel a floral decoration that mirrors that seen on the obverse. This blade is in perfect, Mint condition and is a real beauty, having a fine, needle-like tip. The blade is protected by an in-place brown leather washer.

If you have been looking for a U-9 Dagger, this is your chance to acquire a fine, authentic example.

Excellent Plus, Plus. $5,995.00

NAVAL #35646 Imperial Transitional Naval Dirk with Ivory Grip and Artificial Damascus Blade

This Imperial Naval Dirk shows two periods of history, as the original owner (an Imperial Naval veteran) elected to retain his dagger through the Third Reich period. This dirk is equipped with an Imperial crossguard and the original Imperial pommel cap has been replaced with the “changeover” pommel that was introduced in 1938. This pommel has outstanding hand rendered detail to the feathering of the eagle on both sides. It also has the very deep crevices in the wings where the begin to flare outward. The pommel has a lot of patination that has built up over the years, but to me this speaks to the history the dagger. This pommel is very similar, if not identical, to the outstanding example shown in my Naval Book on page 231. The eagle of course grasps a wreath that bears a mobile swastika in the center. The claws of the eagle also have been hand enhanced. A great depiction here.

The crossguard, a mentioned above, is the original Imperial example. It has center blocks which feature fine, raised fouled anchors on both sides. The backgrounds of the center blocks have been nicely hand pebbled. The crossguards run outward, being four sided, and then end in a capstan design.

The grip is a very choice genuine ivory example. This grip is a real beauty, having a deeply gold-toned obverse with beautiful grains, and a lighter colored reverse, this of course indicating that this dagger has been stored upright over the years. The edges of both sides have outstanding cracks which run down the all of the ribs, giving great beauty and excitement to this grip. The grip has been wrapped with a heavier than normal twisted silver wire. There are gaps between the wire and the grip surface, as over the years the ivory has shrunk, which is a completely normal happening.

Decorating the hilt if a fine Naval aluminum portepee. This portepee shows just the beginnings of a little fray at the upper loop, but the double reef tie still is in completely sound condition. The cord is the thicker type, so that there is little left of the portepee were it comes out of the tie; in fact, the slide and stem are nearly right up against the last loop of the knot. I don't know how this knot was ever tied! It is extremely difficult to tie a Naval double reef knot with an aluminum portepee with this thicker style cord, as most of you Naval collectors are doubtlessly already aware. The lower ball is also in lower condition, and also has the so-called “cat's anus” stuffing. A great looking hilt here, that really talks to you.

The scabbard is the Imperial variety, with the characteristic lightning bolt design. The stampings are still nice and crisp, featuring palmettes around the bands, with the lower portions richly appointed with lightning bolts, ermine feet and acanthus leaves. The acanthus leaves on Imperial scabbards are normally pointed, and this example is no exception. The scabbard show a little bit of carrying time here and there, but there are basically no dents. The bands are are the guilloche style. This scabbard is the same I show, in color, on page 134 (right) of my Naval Book. The throat is retained by two dome-head brass screws. A very fine scabbard here, still having a good amount of gilt finish.

As nice as the outside is on this dagger, the blade is even better! This impressive blade is in the traditional Naval geometry, with double fuller construction and a good, needle-like tip. The blade has been artificially etched with a “Small Roses” Damascus pattern. The blade shows only normal age and is still in nearly perfect condition, with no pits or problems to be seen. The obverse center area bears a raised out Imperial crown over a fouled anchor. This depiction is gilded, and does show some wear, mostly on the outer edges. The inner edges where the depiction is protected by the raised center section of the double fullers still retains most of the gilded finish. The reverse of the blade is plain, except for the etched turn-of-the-century marking of the W.K. & C. firm, being a King's head next to a knight's head, both positioned over the firm's initials. The etched blade art was also used during the Imperial period, although it is quite rare to see. This blade easily grades in Excellent Plus, Plus to Near Mint condition. It is protected by an in-place off-red leather buffer. This blade is very similar to the two artificial Damascus blades I show, in color, on pages 398 and 399 of my Navy Book.

A great example here, which is extremely rare and seldom seen today. For those out there collecting Naval variants, this example is a must. A very exciting and beautiful dagger.

Excellent Plus. $6,495.00

NAVAL #35550C Wiemar Transitional Naval Dagger with Damascus Blade and Ivory Grip – WKC

This interesting Transitional Naval Dagger appears to me as though it was originally worn during the 1920's. It is possible the owner remained in the Navy through the Third Reich period, and had the dagger updated to reflect the times. It appears that the scabbard and pommel are both of Third Reich WKC vintage, while the crossguard, grip and blade are most likely from an earlier period. In the German Navy, this upgrading of dirks to reflect the times was quite a commonplace occurrence.

The pommel appears to be the same as the WKC example I shown on page 269 of my Naval Book. It also has a slightly newer look than the crossguard, usually being an indication of a changeover. This pommel has excellent detail to the bird's head, breast feathering, half-open wings, talons, and wreath with swastika. There is also about 80% of the original gilt finish remaining. The crossguard appears to have more wear, and appears to be from the 1920's period. This guard depicts fouled anchors on both center blocks, and has acanthus leaves which decorate the outgoing crossguard arms. The ends have the the traditional lined buttons with nipples in the center.

The grip of this example is a beautiful genuine ivory. The ivory has some pleasing grain running throughout, and some attractive golden tones. This grip is the type that has twin sets of grip wire that we sometimes see, particularly on Imperial era grips. I do not think, however, that this is a vintage Imperial grip, because the blade has a marking that I normally associate with a period after World War I. If you are not familiar with grips with dual wire, you can see one on page 57 (center) of my Navy Book. There are no cracks or flaws on this fine ivory grip.

The hilt is decorated with what appears to be the original silver bullion knot. This portepee has long ago turned a dark gold color. It is tied in the traditional double reef knot, and although it shows age, there is no fraying to be seen. The slide and stem have the “V” designs, and they have also turned dark. The lower ball is the silver bullion type, matching the darkness of the strap, slide, and stem. The insert is a smooth fabric, having a lined texture. A very fine hilt here.

The scabbard is a traditional Third Reich period WKC example. It has the lightning bolt motif, and still has about 90% of the original gilding on the finish. The stamping of the designs is crisp and deep, featuring palmettes on the bands, with lightning bolts, ermine feet and acanthus leaves visible on the lower portion. The bands are the “high-off-the-surface” style, featuring overlapping oak leaves shot through with acorns. The eyelets are the triple-serrated type, showing some modest wear to the surfaces. The throat is retained by two dome-head screws.

The blade is a fine Damascus pattern that is the standard “Maiden Hair” motif. This blade shows some minor age, but there is no pitting or blemishes. The tip is still needle-like. The obverse ricasso is stamped with the knight head trademark, and beneath are the initials of the firm, “WKC”. As stated above, I feel that this Damascus blade probably comes from the 1920's.

The lock on this blade is rather interesting. There is no release button on the reverse crossguard. The blade was retained by the locking mechanism, but it was necessary for the owner to give a tug in order to pull the blade out. The lock mechanism has been slightly slanted at the catch area to make the removal of the blade relatively easy. This lack of a release button is an anomaly that was done in the 1920's to save money. The catalogs from this period actually show a release button as an option! To illustrate this point, I show a copy of the Carl Eickhorn catalog from November 1933 on page 204 of my Naval Book. In this catalog it illustrates the Blade Release Button as an optional item. The blade is protected by an off-red felt buffer.

This is a nifty transitional dagger, and a fun example to have in a collection, as it clearly illustrates how older Naval Dirks were modified for wear during the Third Reich period. A fine, rarely seen Naval Dirk here.

Excellent. $7,500.00

NAVAL #35571 2nd Model Naval Dagger – Paul Weyersberg

We do not see many Paul Weyersberg pieces, and this one is a classic example. It is identical to the piece that I show in my Naval Book on page 292.

The fine pommel is identical to the example show on page 293 of my Navy Book. These mounts are basically down to the brass, with not much gilding left, with only just a little remaining in the recesses. The pommel has a fine eagle head which looks to the viewer's left. There is full detail throughout the eye, beak, breast and wing feathering, talons, wreath and raised mobile swastika of this bird.

The crossguard also has good detail to the fouled anchor center block. Acanthus leaves decorate the surfaces of both of the crossguard arms, and they end in nipple-centered buttons.

The grip is a fine, carved wood base type, with a celluloid coating. This celluloid has nicely tones over the years, and is still in perfect condition. The grip is tightly wrapped with twisted brass wire, still having some period dirt caught between the wire and the grip ribs.

The original aluminum Naval knot is still in places, found in the original double reef tie. It is interesting to note that the Naval Officer who originally tied this knot used the slide to keep the upper loops in place. I don't remember ever seeing this in the place, but it makes for a nice touch. Other than age, this knot with its aluminum cord is still in excellent condition, with virtually no wear. The stem has the usual “V” decoration in its weave, and the lower ball is in the “cat's anus” style with a thread insert. A nice hilt here.

The scabbard is completely dent-free and exactly matches the brass tones of the hilt. The scabbard features the usual lightning bolt motif, with palmettes over and under the bands, with lightning bolts, ermine feet and acanthus leaves decorating the lower areas. The bands are relatively high off the surface, featuring overlapping oak leaves with a mix of acorns. The eyelets have the triple-serrated surfaces, showing modest, even wear. The throat is retained by two, flat-head style side screws.

The blade is a fine, double etched example, having good nickel-plated surfaces and a needle-like tip. This blade is not factory bright, but is still very presentable, easily grading in a Excellent Plus, Plus to a Near Mint state. The etch is the standard fouled anchor type, still having most of the gray backgrounds intact. The reverse ricasso is etched with the double ovals used by this firms. The double ovals contain the firm's name and location, “Paul Weyersberg & Co. / Solingen”. In the center is a downward pointing sword flank by a pair of wheat sheaves. The blade is buffered by a dark colored pebbled leather pad.

A nice Weyersberg piece here that is rarely seen in the collecting marking, and a great piece for those collecting Naval types.

Excellent. $1,295.00

NAVAL #35209 Early 1st Model Naval Dagger – WKC

This 1st Model Naval Dagger is one of the examples that were produced during the 1920's. It is pretty dirty, and deeply patinated throughout, but, if anything, I think that it gives the dagger lots of character. If you are the type of person that likes something beautiful and shiny, it would probably be best if you were to go on to the next description.

This 1st Model Dagger is very similar to the example I show on page 202 of my Navy Book. The piece pictured in the book has the same narrow crossguard, and a similar pommel. These parts are of brass base, and they have long ago lost any gilding that they may have had. In fact, the pommel and crossguard are a deep plum color, which is almost black. The pommel has good detail to the cattails and reeds, as well as the cresting waves that run around the lower perimeter. There are just hints of gold around the upper button, and a little bit around the waves here and there. The crossguard, being the narrow type, has good fouled anchor depictions on the center blocks. The acanthus leaves that decorate the crossguard arms are fairly worn, but there is still detail to them. The nipple-centered end buttons are still in good condition, with clear accent lines.

The grip is a carved wood base, being coated with celluloid. The celluloid, although still in perfect condition, is also quite dirty and speaks to the life this dagger has lived. This grip is tightly wrapped with twisted brass wire, which has also darkened to the same tone as the rest of the mounts.

The early WKC scabbard is a lightning bolt example. It has a couple of small dings to the lower end, but they are not serious enough to warrant removal. There is minor amounts of gilding remaining on the obverse scabbard, but the reverse has blackened to match the hilt mounts. The detail to the stamping is still pretty good, having palmettes over and under the carrying bands, and at the bottom there are the usual lightning bolts, ermine feet, and acanthus leaves. This early scabbard has the points on the acanthus leaves, a detail that was eliminated when the Third Reich came in (using more rounded tips) with the exception of one firm: Alcoso. Alcoso continued to use pointed acanthus leaves. The bands on this piece are the thinner type. They feature overlapping oak leaves with acorns, and are fairly “high-off-the-surface”. The eyelets have the engraved oak leaves, which is a WKC trait, on they continued into the Third Reich period. We see the engraved eyelets lots of times on hammered scabbards. The throat of this example is retained by two dome-head brass screws, one in each side.

For such an early dagger I would have expected to the sailing ship motif blade, but this one is the fouled anchor style. WKC offered both types up until about 1938, when they just went with the fouled anchor exclusively. This blade is still mostly bright throughout, and retains a needle-like tip. There are some age spots that are spread around the etched area, but they look more like stains than they do pitting, The gray backgrounds are mostly gone from this blade, but you can still see the etch quite clearly. This blade grades at Excellent. The obverse is stamped with the knight head trademark, and the knight head is the type that does have the detail in the comb, so this piece probably goes back to about 1932 or '33. Beneath the knight head the firm's initials can be seen, “WKC”. The original off-red blade buffer is still in place.

I think that this is really a neat piece. It is obviously not something for the collector looking for Near Mint to Mint items, but it does have a place in a collection where they collector is looking for reality and a testament to history. An interesting early 1st Model Naval Dirk here.

Excellent. $1495.00

NAVAL #35320C Imperial Model 1902 Naval Dirk – WKC

This fine Imperial Model 1902 Naval Dirk is of all brass construction. The pommel cap is the extra cost option, of a larger size which has the open finials at the top. This cap is a real beauty, having fine detail to the finials as well as to the orb and cross piece at the upper area. As is normally the case the cross has been squared to prevent damage to the uniform during wear. The area below the finials at the top of the pommel, is nicely checkered. The dome shaped eight sections which run around the perimeter of the pommel feature alternating crosses and Prussian eagles. Each panel has a border of beads. The crossguard is a fine imperial type having raised fouled anchors in the center blocks. The area around the anchors has been random pebbled. The quillon arms come outward from the center block being four-sided, and they end in stylized capstans. The crossguard shows only nominal wear throughout.

The grip of this example is an outstanding genuine ivory. This ivory is quite beautiful, having a dark golden tone on the reverse and being a lighter off-white on the obverse. The grip has fine grains throughout and there is some nice looking cracking that runs down the edges of both sides. There are no chips, however. This beautiful grip is wrapped with twisted silver wire. Setting off the looks of this fine dagger is what appears to be the original Imperial silver bullion knot. This knot has long since patinated to an appealing gold color. The knot has flecks of red and black that decorate its surfaces. The slide and stem are made up of matching silver toned bullion weave and the lower ball is of bullion. There is some old paint or something which still is clinging to the recesses of this knot but of anything it gives the dagger character. The lower stuffing consists of black and red thread. This is an exceptional hilt here!

The scabbard is also a real dandy, being a hand chased extra cost variety. This scabbard is decorated with rich floral leaves on both sides of the carrying bands. It also has matching floral engravings toward the chape area. In addition to the florals there are lightning bolts which come upward on both sides. The lower chape button also has engraved floral designs. The areas in between have been left plain and really compliment the beautiful designs. The carrying bands are also quite different from what we normally see. These bands have raised out leaves which appear to be similar to tobacco leaves. The eyelets have been hand engraved with oak leaf designs and the carrying rings have rope designs which run throughout their circumference. A beautiful scabbard here which shows some modest carrying time but no denting. On the reverse of the scabbard the monogram of the original owner is professionally engraved. It has quite a bit of wear across the engraving but it appears to be possibly, “IK”. The throat of this example is retained by flush mount screws which seem to have been finished to almost disappear from the scabbard.

The blade of this example is a fine hand forged Damascus. It is in the “maiden hair” style. The blade shows some general age and wear but there is no pitting or rust. This beautiful blade has an outstanding maiden hair pattern. The blade is constructed with double fullers still having good needlelike tip. The upper spine of the ricasso is stamped with the distributor, “A. Luneburg, Kiel”. The ricasso is stamped with the small knighthead trademark used around the turn of the century. There is a fine off-red felt buffer.

This is a fine opportunity to acquire a rapidly disappearing type of Imperial Naval Dirk, and one with ivory grip and Damascus blade!

Excellent Plus, Plus. $4,495.00

NAVAL #35352 2nd Model Naval Dagger with Orange Grip and Hammered Scabbard – WKC

This orange-gripped 2nd Model Naval example is the highly sought after type; however this example shows some wear of the period but still has all of the outstanding characteristics desired by collectors. The pommel and crossguard are the same as I show in my Navy Book on page 270 and 271. These mounts are of highest quality brass showing modest wear to the high spots throughout. The eagle pommel still has good detail to his eye, breast feathering and wing feathering as well as to the talons and swastika within a wreath. The crossguard features the fouled anchor on both sides of the center block with acanthus leaves decorating the quillon obverse and reverse. The crossguard ends in buttons with small nipples at the tip. The grip of this example is a fine tangerine orange color. It is quite beautiful with its tones. The years have trapped a lot of residue between the twisted wrapped brass wire and the lower rib areas. There is a small crack at the reverse lower rib but it hardly shows peeking out just a little bit from a choice toned nylon portepee.

This nylon portepee has long ago turned a desirable gold color. The knot is in the naval double reef tie and there is no fraying to the cord. The stem and slide show a little bit of usage having the “V” designs woven into the motif. The lower ball has turned a fine color and it has the “cat’s anus” style stuffing which we see a lot on knots that were designated for naval daggers.

The scabbard is straight throughout. This scabbard is a hammered style showing a little bit of commensurate wear to the surfaces. The hammer marks though are still nice and crisp and deep. The scabbard chape button is also hammered. The bands are the high off the surface type being overlapping oak leaves with acorns. The eyelets have the engraved oak leaves that we frequently see on WKC scabbards. The throat is retained by two dome head brass screws. This scabbard is the same as page 271 of my Navy Book.

The blade is nice and bright throughout having quality nickel-plated surfaces. The fouled anchor scenes are etched into the surfaces and the frosting in the backgrounds highlights the details of the relief. This blade is in near full mint condition. The obverse ricasso is stamped with the knighthead trademark having the firm’s initials below, “WKC”. There is an off-red felt buffer in place.

This is a very desirable example with the beautiful orange grip and pebbled scabbard. The nylon knot also nicely sets off this dirk.

Excellent Plus. $1,995.00

NAVAL #35249 2nd Model Naval Dagger with Hammered Scabbard – WKC

This 2nd Model Naval Dagger is a classic WKC piece, having all mounts and scabbard that conform to what I show in my Navy Book on pages 269 through 271. The nicely toned brass mounts are highest quality throughout. The pommel still has all of its detail to the bird’s eye, breast feathering and half open wings. The talons are also nicely detailed as is the wreath with enclosed swastika. The crossguard features the fouled anchors on both sides of the center block. The quillon arms are decorated with raised acanthus leaves on both sides, ending with a lined button and nipples at the tip. The grip is a fine carved wood covered with celluloid. The celluloid has turned a pleasing off-white color and it remains in perfect condition. This grip is tightly wrapped with twisted brass wire trapping some of the old residue at the bottoms between the ribs.

The hilt is decorated with the original silver bullion portepee. This portepee is set in the double reef naval tie and shows a little bit of fraying on the upper loop area, the reef knot top area and also where the cord comes out of the tie. It does not look bad though and is commensurate with the history of the dagger. The stem and slide have the “V” decorations woven into the motif. The lower ball has turned a fine gold color and features the “cat’s anus” style stuffing. A nice hilt here.

The hammered scabbard is straight throughout. The hammering is still nice and deep featuring a lower chape button also with hammered finish. The bands are the high off the surface overlapping oak leaves featuring acorns in between. The eyelets have the oak leaves engraved into the surfaces, typical of this producer. The throat is retained by two dome head brass screws.

The blade of this example is in fine, mint condition, featuring bright nickel-plated surfaces with 100% frosting in the backgrounds of the raised fouled anchor etch. A very nice blade here which is maker marked with the knight head trademark positioned over the firm’s initials, “WKC”. The off-red felt buffer is in place showing some mild wear to one of the edges.

A good, solid, hammered scabbard example here, which appears uncleaned and literally “speaks” of the period.

Excellent Plus. $1,595.00

NAVAL #35272 2nd Model Naval Dagger – Paul Weyersberg

This 2nd Model Naval Dagger is a later wartime produced example. We can tell this as the hilt mounts appear to be the pot metal based type rather than brass. The way to tell this is that the gilded finish is just not as bright as it would normally be over brass. The good part though is that all of the finish is still there with no wear spots. The pommel and crossguard are identical to the examples I show on page 291 and 292 of my Navy Book. The pommel has excellent detail to the bird’s head, breast feathering, half open wing feathering, talons, wreath and mobile enclosed swastika. The crossguard features fouled anchor depictions in the center blocks. The center blocks are slightly bigger than most that we see and can easily be mistaken for Eickhorn until you put the pieces next to each other. The acanthus leaves have good detail on the quillon surfaces of both sides and the quillon ends are in excellent shape with their button formation and nippled tips. The carved wood grip is coated with celluloid. The celluloid is in perfect condition throughout and is tightly wrapped with twisted brass wire. A good wartime hilt here!

The scabbard is an interesting example which appears to be the same as the piece that I show on page 292 of my Navy Book. It is a lightning bolt variety being straight throughout. This scabbard is made of all brass. The engravings throughout the scabbard are excellent to include the palmettes which appear over and under the carrying bands, as well as the lightning bolts, ermine feet and acanthus leaves which are stamped below. The carrying bands have excellent detail to the overlapping oak leaves and the eyelets are the triple serrated type and have the small sleeves in each of the openings similar to the Alcoso look. The throat is retained by two brass dome head screws.

The double etched blade features the fouled anchor scenes and it is still bright throughout with needlelike tip. This blade shows just the slightest bit of age in the surfaces but it is not bad still rating in near mint condition. There are a couple of scratches on the reverse ricasso near the blade release lock but otherwise the blade is nice and clean. The obverse ricasso is etched with the dual ovals used by this firm. The ovals enclose the firm’s name and location, “Paul Weyersberg Solingen”. Inside is a downward pointing sword placed between two wheat shafts. The original off-red felt buffer shows some mild wear around the edges only.

A fairly rare maker and also a fine example for those out there collecting “types” as we rarely see wartime produced Weyersberg pieces.

Excellent. $1,195.00

NAVAL #35262 2nd Model Naval Dagger – F.W. Höller

This Höller 2nd Model Naval Dagger has classic Höller hilt mounts identical to the examples I show in my Navy Book on page 378 and 379. The Höller pommel is slightly smaller and more delicate than most of them that we see. This gives a good look to the eagle which has full details to his head, breast feathering, wing feathering, talons, wreath and mobile swastika. The crossguard features the standard fouled anchors on both sides of the center blocks. The quillon arms have good detailing to the acanthus leaves on both sides. The button ends have good accent lines and fairly large nipples at the tip, the same as page 279.

The grip is a carved wood base having a celluloid covering. The celluloid has nicely age toned and has a small crack in the obverse upper rib. There is no material missing and the crack is quite nominal and would mostly cover should there be an additional portepee put onto this piece. This grip is tightly wrapped with a copper springy wire typical of this firm. The scabbard is straight throughout. This scabbard has a hammered finish and is the style that is equipped with the very large eyelets. These scabbards, in my opinion, were a generic variety and we see them used on other producers such as Hörster and Weyersberg. This scabbard has a plain chape button at the bottom. The carrying bands have good overlapping oak leaves and acorns showing some modest surface wear. The triple serrations to the eyelets also show some wear but the serrations are all there. The throat is retained by two dome head brass side screws.

As is always the case with Höller daggers the blade etch features the sailing ship motif. This blade shows some mild smudging in places and is just the slightest bit gray. The edges are still good though and it is easy to see the sailing ships on both sides with their fully rigged sails and flying ensigns. This blade rates at about Excellent Plus. The reverse ricasso is matching etched with the double ovals used by this firm. The ovals contain the firm’s name and location, “F.W. Höller Solingen”. Inside is the classic thermometer logo, having too many digits to count. The original brown leather blade washer is in place.

A good dagger here, showing wear of the time, but still being in excellent, collectible condition.

Excellent Plus. $1,195.00

NAVAL #35228 2nd Model Naval Dagger – Carl Eickhorn

This handsome Eickhorn 2nd Model Naval Dagger is about as nice as you will see them condition wise. The hilt mounts are identical to the examples I show in my navy book on page 263 and 266. These outstanding brass mounts have nearly 100% of the original gilded finish throughout their surfaces. The pommel is a real beauty having new-like detail to the bird’s head, breast feathering, half open wing feathering, talons, wreath and mobile swastika enclosed within. The crossguard features the fouled anchors on both sides of the center blocks and has fine detail to the acanthus leaves raised out of the quillon arms. The button ends just show the slightest wear to the gilt just being from a few times of carrying wear. The button ends have the Eickhorn style nipples at the tips. The grip of this example is a carved wood having outstanding off-white celluloid covering. The celluloid is in perfect condition throughout and is tightly wrapped with twisted brass wire.

There is an original to the piece aluminum portepee. This portepee is the style with the thicker cord and it is perfectly set in place with the naval double reef knot. There is no fray on this knot only age toning. The knot is slightly different from those we normally see as it has gold weave in a “V” shape throughout the surfaces. This gold weave contrasts nicely with the aluminum. The lower ball has the yarn-like aluminum bullion covering and the insert is a smooth bullion type. A very fine hilt here!

The scabbard is an outstanding lightning bolt stamped variety. This scabbard has nearly 100% of the original gilded finish, and almost looks like it just came out of the box! It has beautiful detail to the palmettes which are stamped above and under the carrying bands. On the lower portion of this scabbard is the lightning bolt motif with ermine feet and acanthus leaves below. This scabbard format is identical to page 266. The eyelets have the triple serrated surfaces and they are still crisp. The rings still have about 25% to 30% of the original gilding on their surfaces. The throat is retained by two dome head brass screws. You will not see a better scabbard that was actually worn during the period.

The impressive double etched blade has quality nickel-plated surfaces with needlelike tip. The frosted backgrounds perfectly highlight the fouled anchor etch. This blade is easily in full mint condition. The reverse ricasso is stamped with the 1935-41 trademark. It depicts a seated squirrel holding a downward pointing sword. Above the animal is the quality word, “original” and below is the factories name and location, “Eickhorn Solingen”. The original tan felt blade buffer is in place.

A very beautiful, top conditioned 2nd Model Naval Dagger here!

Mint Minus. $1,795.00

NAVAL #35306C 2nd Model Naval Dagger – Adolf Braun (Alcoso)

This Adolf Braun marked 2nd Model Naval Dagger was produced by Alcoso and sold to Braun, who was a distributor in Berlin. This dagger is identical to the example I show in my my Navy Book on page 301. Since the dagger was produced by the Alcoso firm it is made of all classic Alcoso mounts. The pommel and crossguard are identical to the examples I show in my navy book on page 295 and also on page 301. The mounts are all in a patinated brass having a dull look throughout. The pommel shows good detail to the bird’s head, breast feathering, half open wings, talons, wreath and mobile swastika. The crossguard is the type that has the square quillon ends the same as I show on page 297. On the Alcoso crossguards the fouled anchor motif in the center block is only shown on the obverse. On the reverse Alcoso portrayed a diamond in the center having floral decoration around the diamond. This is a carry over from the old Imperial times.

The grip is a carved wood base having celluloid covering. Unfortunately there is a couple of cracks at the top rib of the grip but they are not bad and there is no material missing. The rest of the grip is in fine condition and is tightly wrapped with a brass springy style wire. There is an original to the piece nylon portepee still in place about the hilt tied in the naval wreath knot. This portepee shows a little bit of fray on the top of the knot but the rest of it is still in good condition. The knot has turned a pleasing gold color. The slide and stem have the “V” style decorations in the motif. The lower ball also has turned a fine gold color and the “cat’s anus” style stuffing contrasts slightly as it is a lighter color than the nylon thread of the ball. Not a bad looking hilt here.

The scabbard is a typical Alcoso type. It is a lightning bolt variety having good stamping to the palmettes above and below the carrying bands as well as to the lightning bolts, ermine feet and acanthus leaves at the bottom. The acanthus leaves on Alcoso scabbards have pointed tips which is also a carryover from the imperial period. You can see this scabbard type on page 301. The bands are in good condition throughout featuring overlapping oak leaves and acorns. The eyelets are the triple serrated type which still have good detail and they feature the sleeves on each of the openings, typical of Alcoso and the same as is pictured on page 299. this fine straight scabbard has a throat that is retained by two brass side screws. The blade is a plain type having dual fuller construction. I believe that all of the other Braun stamped pieces I’ve seen in the past also were plain. The blade is in fine bright condition having needle-like tip. On the reverse it is stamped horizontally, “Adolf Braun / Berlin”. The original off-red felt blade buffer is in place, showing some minor wear to the edges.

A rarely seen dagger here and a “must” for those out there that are collecting “type” Naval dirks.

Excellent Plus. $1,395.00

NAVAL #35079 2nd Model Naval Dagger – WKC

This 2nd Model Naval Dagger is in nice condition throughout, still having most of its gilded surfaces and having lots of appeal. The hilt mounts are the same as I show in my Navy Book on page 273 through 274. The pommel has outstanding detail to the half open-winged eagle featuring fine condition to the bird’s head, breast feathering, half open wings, talons, wreath and mobile swastika. The crossguard shows little wear having fine detail to the fouled anchors on both sides of the center block and also to the acanthus leaves raised out of the quillon arms. The quillon ends are still crisp with nipples at the tip. The guard is the same as page 274.

The grip is a wood carved base having perfect celluloid coating. This celluloid has turned an off-white color and is tightly wrapped with twisted brass wire. The scabbard is a straight lightning bolt type. The stampings to the palmettes above and below the carrying bands is deep as is the case with the lightning bolts, ermine feet and acanthus leaves below. This scabbard is the same as the example shown on page 274. The bands are the high-off-the-surface variety featuring fine detail to the overlapping oak leaves and acorns. The eyelets feature the triple serrated surfaces still being very crisp. The throat is retained by two brass dome head side screws.

The blade is a very fine example, featuring an excellent nickel-plated surface which is still bright throughout. The frosting is at 100% behind the fouled anchor etch, highlighting these raised points. This blade is easily in near full mint condition. The obverse ricasso is stamped with the knighthead trademark and below are the firm’s initials, “WKC”. The original off-red felt blade buffer is in place showing only age but little wear. A very fine WKC piece here.

Excellent Plus, Plus. $1,350.00

NAVAL #35054C Imperial Damascus Presentation Dirk - J. Robrecht, Berlin

This Imperial Naval Dirk is a most beautiful, high quality example, presented from a father to his son. The son went on to become an Imperial U-boat commander, and of course, there could be much research that could be performed on this dirk. The dirk is a delicately proportioned example throughout. The pommel is the style with open finial. The finials have the serrated edges, and they curl upward to hold an orb and a cross. The cross is the square type that we see on these dirks. The upper portion below the finials of the pommel is nicely hand checkered with dots in the diamond areas. The pommel itself has eight sections, which are all decorated with a dot pattern that runs around the border. These dome shaped panels alternate depictions of a cross, and also a Prussian eagle. It is interesting to note that the lower portion around the domes is also hand decorated with a laurel leaf like pattern. The crossguard is the conventional type with center block fouled anchors. These anchors are highly raised out, and have pebbled backgrounds. The four sided quillon arms are smooth where they go outward from the center block, and at the point where they flare outward to a capstan, they also have been decorated with leaves similar to the pommel. The area above the center block, which captures the grip, also has been custom leaf decorated. This is a nice touch that is not seen on standard examples.

The grip is a most beautiful ivory, having ribs that run downward from right to left. The ivory has toned nicely to a light, golden color, and the color hues vary slightly from obverse to reverse. There are no chips or cracks in this superb ivory grip. This grip is tightly wrapped with twisted brass wire, and it has a total of seven sections. There is also some old age residue that is trapped around the grip wire, giving a small sense of the dagger's history.

The scabbard has matching gilt finish, which is almost all there. This beautiful scabbard has been hand engraved with oak leaves mixed with laurel leaves around the figure eight bands, as well as at the lower section of the scabbard, running toward the chape. The chape button has also been hand engraved with leaves. This decoration is extremely tasteful, and really looks great. The decoration is similar to the color example I show in my navy book on page 67, right. The bands, as indicated above, are the figure eight type, and the rope knots appear on both sides of the scabbard. The eyelets, as well as the hanging rings, have been finished to simulate rope-like material. Despite this scabbard's age and delicate looks, it is completely dent free, showing only the most modest signs of carrying. The throat is the style which cantilevers over on all sides and it is retained by two dome head screws.

The blade is a double fuller example, being produced of hand forged Damascus. The Damascus pattern is a fine "maidenhair" style and is extremely prominent. This Damascus remains in full mint condition, and could not be any more impressive. The obverse blade has a raised and gilded dedication which is within the fullers. The dedication reads, "DR. ERSNT WILLICH s/l JOHN CURT WILLICH". On the reverse, a similar dedication conveys the date of this daggers presentation, "28 SEPTEMBER 1908". Dr. Willich was the father of John Curt Willich. Curt Willich is listed in the naval rank list as joining the navy in April of 1905. Apparently, the 1908 date was when Willich obtained his officer status. During the War, Willich was initially signed to the "Grozzer Kurfurst", but later in 1916 joined the U-boat service aboard "U3". In August of 1916, he became commander of "UC24". Unfortunately, on 24.5.17, Willich was killed aboard UC24 when the U-boat was sunk near Cattaro. Cattaro is a coastal town in Montenegro. Obviously, there is a lot that could be researched regarding this U-boat commander. The gilt that is inlaid into the raised dedication of this blade is all there. It is interesting to note that the distributor, "J. Robrecht", has his name etched out of one side of the ricasso spine. On the other side is the location of "Berlin", and also the abbreviation "Hofl'" meaning that Robrecht was a supplier to the royal family.

The original buffer is an off-white felt, and is still in good condition, showing some usage. The overall quality and condition of this dagger, compared with the fact that its original owner led a very exciting, historical career, makes it an extremely desirable piece that could easily highlight a naval collection. One of the finest Imperial dirks that I have had the pleasure to carry.

Near Mint. $9,995.00

NAVAL #35075 Imperial Naval Dirk with Ivory Grip

This Imperial Naval Dirk is in about as good of a condition as I can remember seeing. Considering its age, it is remarkable how these beautiful, brass mounts throughout, have retained most of the original, gilded finish. This example is equipped with the Third Reich style pommel, which was replaced probably during the 1938 period. The pommel is the same as the replacement types I show on page 229 of my Navy Book. It is also interesting to note that the lower portion of the pedestal has been trimmed, so that the pommel faces directly outward. This trimming would have been done during the 1938 period. This treatment of the pommel can be seen on page 237 of my naval book. In fact, the dagger that I show on this page is very similar to this superb piece. The pommel of this dagger has outstanding details throughout the bird's head, breast feathering, half open wings, talons, wreath, and raised out swastika. The gilded finish appears to be all there on this pommel.

The crossguard below is also an exceptional example. The center block features a raised out anchor, having a random, pebbled pattern background. The anchor is extremely well done, having outstanding detail, and very high relief. The four sided quillons extend outward and convert to capstan ends. This crossguard shows very little wear and still has almost 100% of its original, gilded finish. The area above the crossguard which accepts the grip has also been hand rendered with some sort of leaf design. The grip is a most beautiful, genuine ivory example. This grip has one minor crack on the left lower edge, and there is some nice looking cracking along the right edge, which is more at the bottom than at the top. This grip has no chips, and features a nice, golden, toning on the reverse, with a somewhat whiter look on the obverse. There are grains visible though, on both sides. This grip is tightly wrapped with a copper, springy wire. This wire also has lots of period residue trapped between the ribs. A stunning hilt here.

The scabbard is just as nice as the hilt. This beautiful scabbard is straight as an arrow, having fine, peened surfaces which extend to the lower cap. This scabbard finish still appears to have all of its original gilt. Another interesting point about this scabbard are the carrying bands. These bands are beautifully formed leaves and acorns, all of which have hand enhancing. The leaves are also higher off the surface than most, having delicate, hand enhanced edges. The eyelets also have leaves engraved into the surfaces, and the rings are hammered to match the scabbard. Very beautiful, indeed! This scabbard has the look of a work of art! The thin throat is retained by two dome head, brass screws.

The blade is as nice as you will see, it is an unmarked, double etched type, having a rich, nickel plating. It is etched with the sailing ship motif, having 100% frosting in the backgrounds. This blade easily rates in mint condition. The details of the obverse feature the fouled anchor over a sailing ship. The etch has floral designs below the ship, and above the ship. On the reverse, there is no anchor, having merely floral motifs, with only one sailing ship. The detail is magnificent throughout this design. It is also interesting to note that there is no Imperial crown over the anchor. It is possible that this blade was redone after the War, or perhaps this small maker, whoever it was, did not put the crown in their design. The blade lock is also quite interesting, in that it is not countersunk into the ricasso of the blade. This is another reason perhaps, to think that this blade could have been added at another time. There is also no butt plate below the crossguard, which would have impeded to the working of the blade lock.

An interesting variation here, but with naval daggers, we are used to seeing many types of variations, all involving updating of periods. An extremely beautiful naval dirk here, and an outstanding candidate for a highlighted piece within an advanced collection.

Mint Minus. $3,495.00

NAVAL #35076 2nd Model Naval Dagger - WKC

This second model naval dagger is in "as found" condition, appearing to have never been cleaned since the War. If you are the type of individual that gets a real "feel" for things like this, it is a great dagger for you. This dagger is a textbook W.K.C. example, being the same as I show in my Navy Book on page 270. The all-brass fittings have a deep patination throughout. They are slightly dull, but it appears to me that if they were cleaned, they would come up much brighter, as there still appears to be quite a bit of gilt beneath the dirt.

The pommel is in excellent shape, having fine detail to the bird's head, breast feathering, wing feathering, talons, wreath, and mobile swastika. The crossguard is an excellent example, showing some minor usage, but still good detail to the fouled anchors, acanthus leaves, on both sides of the quillon arms, and to the buttons with their engravings around the circumference. The grip is a carved wood base, having good celluloid covering. This celluloid has turned to a slightly darker tone, still being in perfect condition. It is tightly wrapped with twisted, brass wire. The wire has trapped lots of original residue between the ribs.

There is also an original-to-the-piece aluminum portepee. This portepee is set in the original double reef knot. There is some fraying to the knot on the back of the loop, as well as the back of the lower loop. The knot also frayed where it comes out of the cord. There is some wire twisted around the bottom section of the cord, between the slide and stem. This wire was put in place to keep the ball from breaking off of the cord. It looks to me as though this wire repair job was done during the period. The lower stem and ball are in good shape, with an insert of flat style bullion. An interesting, original, untouched hilt here.

The scabbard is is the lightning bolt style. It is straight throughout, and it is the same as I show on page 271. This scabbard has good stampings to the palmettes around the bands, the lightning bolts, the ermine feet, and also to the acanthus leaves below. The scabbard is straight throughout, and has good, high-off-the-surface bands. These bands have good, overlapping, leaves and acorn mix. The eyelets are the triple serrated type, showing some wear to the surfaces. The blade is a double etched example, having outstanding, nickel plated finish. The backgrounds behind the etch are 100%, and this blade grades in mint condition, still having its needle-like tip. The obverse ricasso is deeply stamped with the knighthead trademark. The firm's initials are stamped below, "W.K.C.". The blade is protected by the in-place, original, off-red, felt buffer. A good dagger here, for those of you out there that prefer the untouched, uncleaned look.

Excellent Plus. $1,295.00

NAVAL #33343 2nd Naval Dagger with Orange Grip and Hammered Scabbard - WKC

This very desirable WKC 2nd Model Naval Dagger has textbook WKC mounts. The pommel and cross guard being identical to the example on page 366 of my Navy Book. These mounts have maybe 30-40% of the original gilt in the recesses. They do not look to have been cleaned since the War, so they have pleasing patination throughout their surfaces. The WKC pommel has the great looking eagle’s head with beak and good detail to the breast feathering below. The bird grasps a wreathed mobile swastika in its talons. The cross guard has the standard fouled anchor depiction on both sides of the center block, and both cross guard arms have the acanthus leaves on both sides. The end buttons show nominal wear with good enhanced engravings and nipples at the center.

The grip of this example is a fine dark pumpkin color, showing a little bit of lighter tones at the upper and lower where a portepee had once graced the piece. Also, the reverse grip is just the slightest bit lighter in color tone. This beautiful grip is in perfect condition, except for just the slightest hair-liner on the right reverse lower edge. It is nothing however, and would easily be covered with a portepee. This beautiful grip is tightly wrapped with twisted brass wire.

The scabbard is identical to the book piece on page 366. It is a peened variety and is straight throughout. This scabbard has a little less gilt than is shown on the book piece but still has some remaining gold in the lower recesses and also in the areas protected by the bands. The bands are the style with the overlapping oak leaves and acorn mix. These bands still have outstanding detail. The eyelets are the traditional WKC type when seen with hammered scabbard – they have oak leaves engraved into their surfaces. The throat is retained by two dome head brass side screws.

The blade of this example is as nice as you will see. It is a very high quality nickel plated type, still having its needle-like tip. The double etches are the fouled anchor variety. The gray backgrounds remain at 100% and really set off the beautiful crisp etch. The anchors are extremely well done, as are the decorative sea plants, which are spaced around the beginning and end etch areas. This mint blade is stamped on the obverse ricasso with the knight head trademark. Beneath the logo is the firm’s initials “WKC”. The original brown leather blade washer is in place.

If you are looking for an affordable orange gripped pebbled scabbard naval, this one should suit your purposes. It is a very fine dagger, and if cleaned would really turn some heads.

Excellent Plus. $2,195.00

NAVAL #34989 2nd Model Naval Administrative Dirk with Hangers

Over the years I have looked at many Naval daggers where the owners thought that they were the administrative type. Every one that I looked at was a case where the dagger was made late and had steel fittings. The original gilt had just come off of the steel scabbard mounts as well as the cast iron pommel and crossguard giving the look of an old silver finish. This dagger though is an exception to what I have seen in the past. This dagger is an all brass based example and it has a light silver plating throughout which shows wear in all of the correct places. Where there is wear there are slight glints of the brass base below. This dagger “talks to me” and I do believe that it is an original administrative piece. This is a very rare dagger seeing as I have seen many hundreds of naval daggers in the past and this is really the first one that I actually like. The blade is unmarked on this piece but the mounts are all WKC. The pommel and crossguard are the same as I show in my Navy Book on page 272 and 274. These mounts are in excellent shape with the silvering still being about 90 to 95% across the surfaces. The push button release has some silvering left to it but most of the outside surfaces are down to the brass. Obviously the button would have been the first to wear. The detail throughout the pommel is excellent showing a fine half open-winged eagle clutching a wreath with mobile swastika. The crossguard has the usual fouled anchor center blocks with quillons that go outward having acanthus leaves ending with button ends having nice line enhancing and nipples at the tip. The grip is a fine off-white example which is still in perfect condition and is tightly wrapped with toned twisted brass wire.

Setting the hilt off is a fine silver bullion knot. This naval portepee is in choice condition throughout having some age toning evenly spread over its surfaces and still being in the original tie. There is no fraying on this cord. The slide and stem are the bullion weave type surfaces having the “V” design throughout. The lower ball is a silver bullion example having the “cat’s anus” style stuffing. A nice hilt here especially looking at the silvered features. The scabbard is a lightning bolt type. The silvering is maybe 85-90% intact. The silvering shows some wear around the bands and also to the palmette area on the reverse. There is also wear to the area between the lower palmettes and the chape which appears to be normal hand wear. The same is true of the triple serrated eyelets.

The scabbard is dent free except for a couple of extremely minor carrying signs. It is interesting to note that in the lower area of the small carrying hit at the middle of the lower scabbard there are still silver traces which would be indicative of a ding which has been there a long time. This throat is retained by two brass dome head screws which also look to have had a silvering at one time. Attached to the two hanging rings is a choice set of brass base administrative hangers which have old silver plated mounts. The silvering to the snap clips on both ends is starting to wear however it is still mostly there and the same is true of the chain and regain hook. The two lion head masks still retain all of their silvering and are nice and crisp. The black lined moiré fabric is still in good shape on the obverse of these straps and on the reverse they have good black high pile velvet showing only nominal wear. The blade of this example is a plain type having excellent plated finish with needlelike tip and dual fuller construction.

This blade is in mint condition. As indicated above it is not hallmarked. The original off-red felt buffer is in place. This is a neat dagger to add to a full collection or it is just a great piece to have as an oddity. I believe this to be a legitimate administrative piece here and once you see it I’m sure that you’ll agree with me. A rare opportunity!

Excellent Plus. $2,395.00

NAVAL #31687 2nd Model Naval Dagger – WKC

This fine example has some very interesting aspects about it and is of highest quality production. The hilt parts are of all brass construction having excellent gilded finish. In fact, the finish is still 80-85% throughout. The pommel is one of the 1938 “change over” types and is identical to the example I show in my Navy Book page 229, right. This pommel is a real beauty having highly vaulted wreath with gilded swastika in the center and a very nice deep curl to the half open eagle’s wings. This pommel shows little wear and would have been a replacement for the early round ball pommel that existed on this dagger when it was first produced. The crossguard is a typical WKC example looking about the same as the one shown on page 274, center. The detail to the crossguard is still outstanding showing little to no wear. The center block anchors are nicely displayed as are the raised acanthus leaves on both sides of the crossguards. The end buttons are also still relatively crisp.

The grip of this example is an appealing off-white color. It is in perfect condition throughout being a celluloid coating over a wood base. This grip is tightly wrapped with twisted brass wire. The aluminum portepee is nicely set in place and appears to have been on the dagger a long time. This portepee is in excellent condition showing only age but no fraying.

The scabbard is also a fine desirable example. This scabbard is of solid brass construction having fine hammered surfaces. It too is an earlier form but is basically the same as the types made during the later 1930s the exception being the bands are slightly more narrow than the later types. These bands though are high off the surface depicting fine overlapping oak leaves and acorns. There is some mild wear to the bands but not bad. It is also interesting to note that the eyelets have had hand engraving to replicate oak leaves in their surfaces. This was a trait that is commonly seen on hammered scabbards by WKC. This scabbard looks nearly identical to the example shown on page 215 of my Navy Book. The scabbard is straight throughout with the exception of just the tiniest carrying hit at the bottom just above the button end. It is nothing however. The rings on this example are plain and the throat is retained by fine brass screws which are located fairly low down.

The blade is a double etched sailing ship variety still being nice and bright throughout. The sailing ship etch is all there but it is starting to thin a little and is a bit difficult to see as the frosting is mostly gone from the backgrounds. Remember, this is an old blade that probably was wiped off many times by its original carrier as well as others who have owned the dagger after the war. The blade though still grades easily at excellent plus condition. It has a fine needlelike tip and the obverse ricasso is stamped with the knighthead logo. The logo is positioned over the firm’s initials, “WKC”. The original off-red felt buffer is in place.

This is a very nice early WKC dagger which was probably originally produced about 1933 to 1935. It was worn by its owner with its original ball top pommel until that was replaced in 1938 with the eagle and swastika. This dagger shows a lot of nautical history here and is in very fine collectible condition. A great dagger here for those who know naval pieces and enjoy studying all their attributes.

Excellent Plus. $2,295.00

NAVAL #31717 2nd Model Naval Dagger – Carl Eickhorn

This Eickhorn 2nd Model Naval Dagger is in excellent condition, showing signs of wear during the period but still being in very collectible condition. The pommel and cross guard are textbook Eickhorn types, being identical to the examples I show on pages 263 and 266 of my Navy Book. The brass based mounts have fairly good gilding throughout. The pommel has approximately 50% - 60% of the gilt and the cross guard has slightly more gilt. The pommel has excellent detail to the eagle’s head, breast feathering, wing feathering, talons, wreath and swastika. The cross guard has the usual fouled anchor center blocks with good acanthus leaves throughout the quillon arms. The end buttons are well done.

The grip is an off-white celluloid over wood base. It is in perfect condition throughout and it is tightly wrapped with twisted brass wire. The scabbard that is with this example appears to be possibly a Hörster. It is identical to the example that I show on page 285. This dagger was purchased from a Vet family so that the dagger has always been this way since it came back from the war.

This scabbard is an all brass example having fine hammering to the surfaces. The scabbard is nice and straight and the lower chape button has been left plain. The bands are the higher off-the-surface type and they show some wear to the oak leaves and acorn mix but the detail is still there. The eyelets are the smooth type, exactly like the piece shown on page 285. The throat is the thicker type having a fairly good cantilever over all sides. This throat is retained by two brass dome head screws. The scabbard still has about 20% - 25% of the original gilt. It is still clinging in the areas protected by the bands and the throat and there are also smatterings of gilt here and there on the surfaces. A fine scabbard here.

The blade is a choice double-etched example having good, bright nickel plating. There are some very small age spots in some of the frosting but they are only in the form of minor discoloration, not pits. The fouled anchor etches are still bright and very prominent on the blade. The blade easily rates at excellent plus to near mint. The reverse ricasso is stamped with the over-the-shoulder trademark. The blade is protected by the original tan felt washer. This washer shows some breakdown on one side and the other side shows minor age but it is still basically all there.

A nice hammered scabbard with double etch blade here for a reasonable price. If you are looking for one that has seen wartime experience but still will look nice in your collection, this one should fit the bill.

Excellent Plus. $1,595.00

NAVAL #35004C Early 2nd Model Naval Dagger – Alcoso

This early Alcoso produced example has a scabbard that is fitted with the reef knot bands being identical to the example I show in my Navy Book on page 296. The hilt mounts of this example are in excellent condition having some of the original gilt still remaining in the recesses but mostly they are down to the brass. These mounts appear to be the generic type that was used by Weyersberg, Clemen & Jung, Klaas and others. These mounts are identical to the examples I show on page 293. The eagle is of excellent design having good detail to the features and also to the wreath with mobile swastika. The crossguard has the typical fouled anchors with good detail to the acanthus leaves and button ends. The nipples at the end are the same as is shown on page 293. It is also interesting to note that the blade release button used on this piece is the “drilled” type not the usual “notched” type. The grip is a fine off-white example still being in perfect condition and having tightly twisted brass wire. There is lots of old dirt and residue trapped by the wire in between the ribs.

Setting off the hilt of this dirk is the original aluminum portepee. This portepee is the style with wide cord and it remains in the naval tie. Unfortunately there is some fraying where the cords come out of the naval tie but it is still strong and not apt to break. The slide and stem below are the typical “V” decorated type with a bullion ball at the bottom and the “cat’s anus” style insert. This dagger does not appear to have ever been apart.

The scabbard as noted above is the style with reef knot bands on the obverse and regular rope design on the reverse as well as the eyelets. The scabbard motif is the lightning bolt variety. There is some gold remaining here and there in the recesses which exactly matches the gilt finish to the hilt, crossguard and butt plate. The palmettes are deeply stamped as are the lightning bolts, ermine feet and the pointed acanthus leaves at the bottom. This is all typical Alcoso workmanship here. The throat is retained by two dome head brass screws.

The double etched blade is a choice sailing ship variety. The details to the blade etch are excellent with all of the frosting behind it. The blade features an anchor in the center of the obverse with a sailing ship below making its way over some sea plants. At the upper portion are floral designs. The reverse blade is similar except that there is no anchor and the sailing ship is larger. The details are outstanding and you can even see all of the mast lines as well as the ensigns flying. This blade has its original needlelike tip and is in mint condition. The reverse ricasso is stamped with the Alcoso trademark used from 1937 through 1939. It features the scales having the firm’s initials “ACS” interspersed and above the scales in an arch shape is the firm’s block lettered name, “Alcoso” and below the location city of “Solingen”. The original red felt blade buffer is in place. This is an outstanding untouched naval dirk here by a fairly rare maker and has never been apart. A fine acquisition for a serious naval collector.

Excellent Plus, Plus. $1,995.00

NAVAL #34975 2nd Model Naval Dagger – Carl Eickhorn

This Carl Eickhorn Naval Dagger is equipped with all textbook mounts throughout with pommel, crossguard and scabbard being identical to the pictures I show in my Navy Book on page 263 and 266. Unfortunately someone has epoxied the hilt pieces altogether so that it is impossible to take the grip off of this piece. I discovered this fault when we wanted to change the wire on the grip to the correct wire as what’s on it is not period. Apparently the last person that owned the dagger made this wire installation and then decided to epoxy the dagger together possibly to keep the wire in place. For whatever reason though it definitely hurts the dagger’s value. The pommel and crossguard still have quite a bit of the original gilt across their surfaces being about 85%. The grip itself is in good condition with no breaks. It also has a nice off-white tone to it.

There is also a portepee which is original to this piece. The portepee is a silver bullion type that has turned gold over the years. This portepee shows some fray around the upper loop as well as to the top sections of the naval tie. Where it comes out of the knot it is also frayed and also has fraying where the cord enters the stem. The slide has gone to time. The stem itself also shows fraying to the gold weave work at the top. The lower ball is all silver bullion with a “cat’s anus” style stuffing.

The scabbard is the lightning bolt type having a few modest carrying signs but no real dings. The stamping to the palmettes, lightning bolts, ermine feet and acanthus leaves is still quite good. The overlapping oak leaf bands do show some wear to their surfaces but not too bad. This is also true to the serrated edges of the eyelets. The throat is retained by two dome head brass screws.

The blade of this example is a double etched variety. It is still bright and has its needlelike tip but there is some age which is spread over the surfaces here and there. Most of the frosting is still in the backgrounds of the etch and it is still a pleasure to examine the nautical scenes. This blade only grades at excellent. The reverse ricasso is stamped with the Eickhorn trademark used from 1935-1941. The original brown felt buffer is in place. Because of the epoxy this dagger is priced accordingly. It is a good entry level piece or an excellent piece for someone on a budget. It’s all real and it’s all original.

Excellent. $695.00

NAVAL #33378 Imperial Naval Dirk with 1938 Upgrade Pommel

This Imperial Naval Dirk is a most interesting example because it is named to a Leutnants zur See. The name is “Stader” and we will get to more of this importance later on in the description. It is interesting to note that Wilheim Stader was born September of 1898 and joined the Imperial Navy in April of 1916. This all makes sense as this dagger is an iron base type, still having about 95% of its original gilt. As seasoned collectors know, after WWI began, brass was at a premium for the war effort so naval daggers were made of iron in order to conserve materials. This all jives nicely with the record of Wilheim Stader. The pommel that is installed on this dagger is the 1938 replacement type which featured the eagle with the swastika. I show a number of Imperial daggers that are equipped with this replacement pommel in my Navy Book. You can see a piece on page 232 that has the exact pommel installed. There are other examples on page 234, 235 as well as page 237. I also show a great close up of this pommel on page 229 left.

The pommel, of course, is of brass and it is highly patinated but still looks to have quite a bit of the original gilt in the backgrounds. Looking at Stader's record, I see that he stayed with the navy after WWI and obviously, this would account for the upgrading of his dagger as he continued to wear this Imperial dagger as opposed to buying a new example. The cross guard is a fine iron base example featuring the center block fouled anchors on both sides. The quillion cross guard arms go outward being four-sided. They are peened on all surfaces. At the quillion ends they are flared to the capstan shape and are fluted around the circular inner area. The upper part of the cross guard which contains the acceptance neck for the grip also has fluted engravings. The gilt on this cross guard is about 95%, showing only wear on the very high edges.

The grip of this example is a very beautiful genuine ivory. The grip has a striking golden area on the surface mixed with lots of prominent grain. The reverse has still stayed mostly white, but the graining is still quite prevalent. The edges of both sides also have beautiful graining, which at first looks like minute cracking, but I believe it is not. Either way, this ivory grip is simply gorgeous! There are no chips or problems anywhere in the grip. The grip is wrapped with a fairly large twisted brass wire. The wire wrap is just slightly loose which is an indication that the ivory has shrunk just a little bit over the last century. It is also interesting to note that years of dirt and residue have left their signs in the lower areas between the grip ribs. A great look here for those who appreciate the history that remains on an untouched dagger.

The scabbard is a steel or iron base and it is as straight as an arrow. This scabbard reflects heavy peening decoration and really looks great. The gilt is all there, except for the very high spots. The bands are also most interesting being an overlapping oak leaf and acorn mix, but they are narrower than the later types and also are higher off the scabbard. The eyelets are quite striking also being engraved with oak leaves throughout the surfaces. The rings have also been peened to match the scabbard. The lower chape is also peened. The scabbard throat is retained by two dome-head brass screws which are highly age-toned and are unturned. A really fine matching scabbard here.

The unmarked blade is also a very interesting example. It has the double fuller design and it is slightly wider than we normally see in these blades. Additionally, the blade is double etched with a pattern design that I have never seen. Both etches have the same decoration at the end which appears to be a flower-like device, but could be a sea plant. In the panel throughout, there are frosted backgrounds and at the bottom area there are raised floral decorations on which rests a fouled anchor with a long dangling chain. Above the anchor is an Imperial crown with cross on the top. The detail to this etch is really fantastic. The reverse etch presents a large fully rigged sailing ship on a sea which is further placed on top of a series of sea plants. The ship has many, many ropes throughout the sail rigging and also lots of detail to the super structure. This is a great looking etch!

The original owner's name is neatly engraved into the obverse ricasso “Stader”. Stader served as a Fähnrich on the ship “Freya” and “Helgoland”. This was from May 1916 to August 1916. After that, he was transferred to the “Nassau” in March of 1917. During April 1917 to April 1918, he was transferred to the naval school for torpedo boats. When the war ended, the records indicate that he remained with the navy after March 1919. It would be a good research project to see where he went from there. Because we have the changeover 1938 pommel, we know for sure that Stader continued to serve with the German Navy. A great research project here! The original off-red felt buffer remains with the dagger showing some wear around the edges, but is still almost 100%.

I believe this is a great dagger here and should have some good research possibilities for the right person. An excellent example to highlight a fine Imperial and Third Reich collection.

Excellent Plus. $2,995

NAVAL #34894 2nd Model Naval Dagger – Carl Eickhorn

This 2nd Model Naval Dagger shows some wear from the period but overall it is still in good collectible condition. The hilt mounts are textbook Eickhorn being identical to the examples I show in my Navy Book on pages 263 and 266. The pommel and crossguard have about 50-60% of the original gilt, mostly in the recesses. The pommel has excellent detail to the bird’s head which is positioned to the viewer’s left. Beneath are excellent breast feathering, talons, wreath and raised swastika within the wreath. The crossguard is the standard type with fouled anchors in the center blocks. The acanthus leaves on the quillon arms are nicely detailed as are the button ends.

The grip is a carved wood base which is coated with off-white celluloid. The celluloid remains in perfect condition and is wrapped with twisted brass wire. The original-to-the-piece nylon portepee is stillinI place in the naval tie. The portepee shows some age and has toned to a golden color. There is only just the slightest start of fray at the cord position under the crossguard but it is nothing. The slide and stem have the “V” designs woven into their surfaces. The lower ball has the yarn-like nylon covering and the insert is the “cat’s anus” type. An extremely nice hilt here!

The lightning bolt scabbard nicely matches with the same amount of gilt remaining as the hilt mounts. This lightning bolt scabbard shows some carrying time and there are just slight indentations in the lower portion of the scabbard but they are really not dense. The lightning bolt pattern is deeply struck featuring palmettes over and under the carrying bands and at the lower portion lightning bolts, ermine feet and acanthus leaves. The scabbard is the same as page 266 in my navy book. The bands are still crisp featuring overlapping oak leaves and acorns. The eyelets have the triple serrated surfaces showing only nominal wear. The throat is retained by two brass dome head side screws.

The blade is a really nice double etched type having needlelike tip. The nautical scenes are beautifully done with full 100% o the gray backgrounds remaining. A great looking blade here which is in mint condition. The reverse ricasso is stamped with the post 41 Eickhorn squirrel. This squirrel is the “over-the-shoulder” type and is the same as page 266. Beneath the squirrel are the three words, “Original / Eickhorn / Solingen”. The original brown felt blade buffer is in place. A nice dagger here which gives a feeling of the period with its wear but still retains great collectability with its condition.

Excellent Plus, Plus. $1,395.00

NAVAL #34826 2nd Model Naval Dagger – Paul Weyersberg

The Weyersberg 2nd Model Naval Dagger is not seen very often. This example shows usage through the period and is identical to the piece that I show on page 293 of my Navy Book. The pommel does not have much gild if any remaining on its surfaces. It does however have excellent detail to the bird’s head, breast feathering, half open wings, talons, wreath and raised mobile swastika. The crossguard has a little more gilt left on the surfaces being maybe about 10-15%. It features anchors in the center block which are the type we sometimes see on Weyersberg, Klaas, and even Clemen & Jung. This crossguard can be identified by the little dot which appears in the center of the two anchor shafts. The crossguards are decorated with acanthus leaves having good button ends with fairly long nipples. The grip shows some age and moisture residue where at one time it must have had a knot on it as it seems to have sealed in the area from which it covered. There is also some green smudge trapped at the neck of the crossguard upper portion. The grip though remains in good condition throughout with no breaks or cracks and it has a good off-white color. This grip is tightly wrapped with twisted brass wire. The crossguard reverse has the “drilled” type button that we see used with this particular maker. The scabbard is straight throughout being a lightning bolt type. There is no gild left on this scabbard and the recesses of the engraved areas have quite a bit of greenish material trapped within.

Excellent. $1,195.00

NAVAL #34725C Imperial Model 1890 Naval Long Dirk Converted to Model 1921

This Imperial Naval Dirk is basically the same as the example I show on page 51 of my Navy Book. There is one main difference though, and that is the fact that the finials have been removed from the pommel. The reason for this is so that the dagger could somewhat conform to the 1919 model, that was produced after the abdication of the Kaiser and the losing of WWI. In other words, the original owner of this dagger served in the Imperial Navy, and once the war was lost, and there no longer was a Kaiser, rather than purchase a new dagger, this officer had the pommel finials removed, making it no longer an Imperial crown type. The job of removal was quite well done, having the area completely checkered and pebbled. In fact, if you did not know that this pommel used to have finials on the top, you would probably not realize it.

The original eight separate panels still are there, however, and they depict the Prussian eagle, and alternating eagle on each one. This pommel has a screw which keeps it tight against the blade tang. Nothing was done to the crossguard, and this guard is still its original Imperial type. It features fouled anchors in the center blocks of both sides. The backgrounds of the anchors have been heavily random pebbled. The quillon arms are four sided and they extend outward to capstan ends.

The grip is a very fine, genuine ivory. It has a very beautiful color tone, being a gold hue on the obverse, and slightly lighter on the reverse. There are also some attractive grains that run in the surfaces of this ivory. There is one crack in the ivory, which is on the reverse, extending from the center part, down to the bottom of the grip. Cracks like this are expected on ivory, and are by no means, a detract. The grip is wrapped with heavy, twisted, silver wire. It is also interesting to note that apparently the blade button release which on these daggers was a two part example, became separated, and the upper section was lost to time. This did not bother the original owner, as he merely substituted a screw, which does the same job.

The scabbard is the long type, having a lightning bolt pattern. This scabbard shows quite a bit of usage over the years, having a number of mild dings in the surfaces, and a few hits to the lower edge. There are palmettes above and below the band, and further down are the upward pointing lightning bolts, ermine feet, and acanthus leaves. The bands are the Guilloche style, meaning that they simulate ropes wrapped around pilings. The detail to the rope-like design is still fairly crisp. The eyelets are plain. The reverse of the scabbard throat area also has the name engraved of the original owner. Unfortunately, the wear to the engraving has left some of the letters indiscernable, so that I am not able to tell you what the name is. Perhaps someone with a real good eye and a loupe could figure this one out. The throat is retained by two small dome head side screws.

The long style blade is the Imperial type with the center ridge, and double edged feature. In order to conform with the "No Imperial" theme, the original wearer also had the etch buffed off this blade. Since the etch had the Imperial crown, it was also offensive at the time. There are very slight traces of the original etch still there if you look close, but at first glance the blade has the appearance of being plain. The condition of the blade is still fairly good, having a needle-like tip. The blade has its original off-red buffer, of which a portion is missing from the right side.

Overall a most interesting dagger here, for those of you who understand some of the transitions that went along with Naval service. Obviously, times were tough, and officers were not about to discard or throw away a good dagger, just because the new example was not like the old example. We see over and over, many instances where daggers have been altered to suit the new fashion. This is the first example of this type that I have seen, and I must say, it is extremely interesting and fascinating to me. I hope someone else out there will also admire this piece of history, which reflects the period from 1890-1921.

Excellent. $2,195.00

NAVAL #34380 2nd Model Naval Dagger - Carl Eickhorn

This 2nd Model Naval Dagger is in choice condition, there is at least 95-98% of the original gilt on the hilt mounts, as well as the scabbard. A nice dagger here! The pommel and crossguard are textbook Eickhorn examples, being the same as I show on pages 263 and 266 of my Navy Book. The pommel is a beauty, having excellent detail to the bird's head, feathering, talons, wreath, and swastika in the center. The gilding is only worn a little bit on the ends of the half-folded wings. The crossguard also has almost all of the gilt, with only a little bit of brass showing through on the left quillon end. The rest of the guard is in choice gilded condition, to include the fouled anchor center blocks, the acanthus leaves on the quillon arms, and the button ends.

The grip is a fine, carved wood, having an off-white, celluloid covering. The celluloid is in perfect condition, and has toned to a pleasing hue. This perfect conditioned grip is tightly wrapped with twisted brass wire. The scabbard is a lightning bolt type, that appears to have nearly all of its gilt. There is one spot at the lower portion of the obverse, where the gilt has either worn off, or perhaps came off from some liquid or other material that sat on the space. It is not bad though, and if anything, gives the dagger charachter. You will always be able to identify your dagger by this particular spot! The rest of the scabbard is a beauty, having great stamping to the palmettes around the carrying bands, and also to the lightning bolts, ermine feet, and acanthus leaves. The bands are the overlapping oak leaves and acorns, showing little to no wear. The eyelets have good, crisp, triple serrations. There is still quite a bit of the original gilding left on the hanging rings. The throat is retained by two dome head brass screws.

As we would hope, the blade is still in nice condition. This blade has a good, bright finish throughout, being nickel plated. The obverse tip is in nice condition, and the reverse tip shows just a little bit of scuffing, where apparently there was a small pit or something removed, but it is hardly noticeable. Other than this, the blade is in choice, mint condition, having fine, fouled anchor etch, with all of the gray in the backgrounds. This fine blade is stamped with the 1935-41 squirrel. The tan felt blade buffer is in place.

A very nice navy dagger here, which should fit into most collections without a problem.

Mint Minus. $1,395.00

NAVAL #34417 2nd Model Naval Dagger - WKC

This 2nd Model Naval example shows some wear and usage of the period. It is a textbook WKC example, having the same pommel crossguard and scabbard as I show in my Navy Book on page 269-271. The pommel and crossguard do not have any gild remaining on the surfaces, having a rich, patinated brass finish. The details though, are still fairly good, to include a fine eagle head pommel, with good breast feathering, wreath, and swastika. The crossguard still has good detail to the fouled anchor center blocks, with good acanthus leaves on the crossguard and button ends.

The grip is a carved wood base, having celluloid covering. The covering is in excellent condition, except for a small spot at the upper reverse rib, where there is a hairline crack. It does not appear to be threatening, and I doubt that it will proceed further. Other than this, the grip is in perfect condition, being slightly darker on the reverse. This grip is tightly wrapped with twisted brass wire. The scabbard is straight throughout, being the lightning bolt type. It also is down to the brass, with no visible gilt.

The scabbard has the "high-off-the-surface" style carrying bands. These bands are still quite crisp, featuring overlapping oak leaves and acorns. The eyelets are triple serrated. The scabbard has good detail to the palmettes around the bands, and at the lower portion to the lightning bolts, the ermine feet, and the acanthus leaves at the lower. The throat is retained by two dome head brass screws.

The blade of this example is a fouled anchor type. Although it is still in nice condition with a very fine, fouled anchor etch, the surfaces have just started to turn slightly gray from age. Other than this though, the blade is in fine condition, easily rating at excellent plus. The obverse ricasso is stamped with the knight head logo with the firm's initials below, "WKC". The original off-red, felt buffer is still in place.

A good, strong, basic naval dagger here, and a great example for someone just getting started, or for someone on a budget.

Excellent. $995.00

NAVAL #34621 2nd Model Naval Dagger - Carl Eickhorn

This Carl Eickhorn produced 2nd Model Naval Dagger is textbook throughout. The pommel and crossguard are the same as I show on page 263 through 267 of my Navy Book. These mounts still have some of the original gild on their finish, and I would say, they are approximately 50%. The pommel shows a little bit of wear to the eagle's head, the breast feathering is still good, as is the wreath containing the mobile swastika. The crossguard is a fine example, having fouled anchor center blocks. The center blocks extend onto quillon arms, which depict fine acanthus leaves, with slotted button ends. A good, strong, hilt here.

The celluloid grip has a carved wood base, and is in perfect condition. This grip has a pleasing ivory color. The grip is tightly wrapped with twisted brass wire, which has trapped plenty of age within the last seventy years within the ribs.

The lightning bolt scabbard is still straight throughout. It has good, solid stampings to the palmettes around the bands, as well as to the lightning bolts, ermine feet, and acanthus leaves at the lower. The bands have excellent detail, depicting overlapping oak leaves with acorns, and the eyelets are the triple-serrated type. The throat is retained by two dome head, brass side screws.

The blade is a double etched example, featuring the fouled anchor pattern. The area containing the etch is still quite good throughout, having nearly all of the gray background. There is a small amount of smudge that appears on the tip area of the blade, as well as on the ricasso area of both sides. Perhaps some of this could be worked out by the next owner. As is sits though, the blade grades at about excellent to excellent plus. The reverse ricasso is stamped with the "over-the-shoulder" style squirrel. The original felt blade buffer shows some usage and some wear, but it is still in place.

A good, solid example here, that is not mint, but is still in good condition and reflective of the last seventy years of decent care.

Excellent. $995.00

NAVAL #34571 2nd Model Naval Dagger - WKC

This 2nd Model Naval Dagger shows quite a bit of wear time, having most of the brass mounts and scabbard down to the base metal. I don't see any gilt remaining on the hilt mounts, but there is some gilt still on the scabbard here and there. This scabbard gilding is maybe 20-25%. The hilt mounts are textbook WKC, being identical to the examples that I show in my Navy Book on page 269-271. The pommel has good detail to the bird's head and breast feathering, as well as to the wreath and mobile swastika. The crossguard is the style with fouled anchor center blocks, and the crossguards are complete with acanthus leaf decoration. The crossguard quillon ends are the button type, with accents cut around the circumference.

The grip is a carved wood base, covered with celluloid. This celluloid has turned a very fine, ivory color, and has a great look to it. The grip is in perfect condition throughout, and it is tightly wrapped with twisted brass wire. The wire has trapped years of dirt residue in between the ribs.

The scabbard shell is basically straight throughout, showing a little bit of wearing time, but no real dings. It is the lightning bolt type, and it is identical to the example shown on page 271. The detail is excellent throughout the palmettos, around the carrying bands, and also to the lightning bolts, ermine feet, and acanthus leaves at the lower portion of the scabbard. The bands are the "high-off-the-surface" type, that we see with this maker. These bands are the same as shown on page 270. The oak leaf and acorn mixture is still fairly crisp, as are the triple serrated eyelets. The throat is retained by two dome head brass side screws.

The double edged blade is the fouled anchor type. It is a nice example, having bright, nickel plated surfaces. There is just the slightest of age noticeable in the tip area, but not much. The ricasso area also has just a little bit of smudge, but overall, this blade is still in nice condition, and grades in near mint. The frosted backgrounds of the etch are still 100%. The obverse ricasso is stamped with the knight head, having the firm's initials below, "WKC". The original, off-red felt buffer is in place.

A good naval dagger here, showing the rigors of wartime wear, but no abuse.

Excellent. $1,195.00

NAVAL #34272 2nd Model Naval Dagger - Carl Eickhorn

This 2nd Model Naval Dagger has signs of age throughout, but no abuse anywhere. The gilt is mostly worn off the hilt parts, but there are some areas where there is lots of gilt remaining in the recesses. The hilt is a textbook Eickhorn example, being identical to the pommel I show in my Navy Book on page 263. The details are still outstanding to the pommel's head, breast feathering, and curved wings. The talons retain a vaulted wreath with a mobile swastika inside. The crossguard is identical to the example I show on page 266. It features a good, crisp, fouled anchor in both of the center blocks, and good acanthus leaves on the front and reverse of both crossguards. The end buttons show little wear with good accent lines running around. The nipples show slight wear to the edges. The grip is a fine, off white example being a carved base with celluloid covering. The celluloid is in perfect condition, and it is tightly wrapped with twisted brass wire.

The scabbard is straight throughout, and like the hilt has some age to the surfaces. About 30% of the gilt remains, and in the area where the gilt has worn off, the brass mounts have turned to a pleasing "plum" color. I like this type of patination, and I am sure if you do, you will like this scabbard. The throat fitting as well as the butt fitting below the crossguard have also turned plum. The scabbard is deeply stamped, having palmets around the bands, and the lower section has the lightning bolts with ermine feet, and acanthus leaves, the same as page 266. The bands have the overlapping oak leaves and acorns, showing little wear. The eyelets are finished with triple serrated edges. The throat is retained by two dome head brass side screws.

The blade is a real pleasure to gaze upon, as it comes out of this patinated scabbard. This blade remains in full mint condition, having high quality nickel finish. The needle like tip is still there, and 100% of the frosting remains around the raised, fouled anchor etch. This mint blade is stamped on the reverse ricasso with the 1935-41 squirrel trademark. The tan felt blade buffer is in place.

A fine example here for someone who is looking for a dagger that has signs of being carried through the war, but no abuse.

Excellent. $1,195.00

NAVAL #34053 2nd Model Naval Dagger – Carl Eickhorn

This Eickhorn 2nd Model Naval Dagger is completely textbook throughout. The pommel has a mild amount of patina on the sections where the gilt has worn to the brass. The detail though is still all there to the bird’s head, breast feathering, talons, wreath and mobile swastika. The gilt on the pommel is maybe 40-50%. The crossguard has much more gilded finish being at about 90%. This crossguard has excellent detail to the center block fouled anchors, the acanthus leaves on the crossguard arms and to the button ends having good deep accent grooves around the circumference. The grip is an off-white example being a carved wood base with celluloid covering. The grip is tightly wrapped with twisted brass wire. This grip has no cracks or any problems.

The scabbard shell is the lightning bolt type. It is completely straight throughout and has excellent remaining gilding. The gilt is slightly worn on the left edge and also in the reverse areas between the bands. The rest of the gilding is still intact being nearly 100% on the obverse. This scabbard has fine carrying bands consisting of overlapping oak leaves with acorn mix. There is little wear to these bands. The eyelets are also in excellent condition. The throat of this example is retained by two dome head brass side screws.

The blade of this piece is about as nice as you will see. It has high quality nickel-plated surfaces which still have an outstanding mirror finish. The double etched blade features the fouled anchor motif. The anchors are in the center area with a floral design above. Below the anchor is an additional anchor which features two serpents twisted around the shaft. The background of the etch remains at 100%. This blade is in mint condition. The reverse ricasso is stamped with the 1935-41 squirrel trademark. This trademark features a sword carrying a downward pointing sword. Above the animal is the word “original” and below is the name of the firm and the location, “Eickhorn Solingen”. The original brown felt buffer is in place.

A nice solid dagger here.

Excellent Plus. $1,395.00

NAVAL #33691 2nd Model Naval Dagger – Carl Eickhorn

This Naval Dagger is a complete textbook Eickhorn recently purchased from the family of a veteran. This dagger has never been in a collection. The dagger is in very fine condition throughout. There is a slight amount of age that has set upon the lower portion of the pommel but this should be not a problem to the next purchaser if he wanted to clean this residue. The pommel appears to still have about 60-70% of the original gilt. It is the same as the examples I show in my Navy Book on page 263 through page 266. The pommel has good detail to the bird’s head, breast feathering, wing feathering, talons, wreath and raised swastika. The classic crossguard features the fouled anchor center block on each side and also has quillon arms which have raised acanthus leaf decoration. The button ends have good engraving throughout their surfaces with nipples at the tips.

The grip is an off-white color and is in perfect condition throughout. This grip is a celluloid over carved wood base. It is tightly wrapped with twisted brass wire. There is some age residue noticeable around the wire wrap which gives a nice feeling of the period to the piece. The dagger also has its original aluminum portepee. This portepee is completely set in place and is in good condition throughout with just a slight amount of wear showing at the top loop area. The original carrier apparently did not look at the instructions when it came time to properly tie his portepee. This portepee is not correct but studying the set-in-place condition, I am sure that it has not been moved since the period. The slide and stem have the usual “V” weave and the lower ball is produced of a yarn-like style bullion. The insert is the “cat’s anus” type typical of portepees designated for the Navy.

The scabbard is a classic lightning bolt type. It is the same as I show on page 266 of my Navy Book. This scabbard has easily about 85-90% of the original gilt showing only a little bit of hand wear on the reverse area between the two bands. The scabbard motif has the palmettes around both carrying bands and at the lower side there are lightning bolts, ermine feet and acanthus leaves. This scabbard is straight as an arrow. The carrying bands are nicely detailed overlapping oak leaves with acorns. There is little to no wear to these bands. The eyelets have the usual triple serrated surfaces showing only modest wear. The throat is contained by two dome head brass side screws.

The double etched blade is about as fine as you will see. The nickel plating is completely bright with a fine raised double etch. This blade is easily in mint condition. The etch panels have 100% of the gray backgrounds and the etch features a fouled anchor in the center on both sides as well as sea plants at the upper portion, and at the lower portion the sea plant resembling a raised sun followed by a fouled anchor having two serpents wrapped around its shaft. The reverse ricasso has the post 1941 trademark consisting of the “Over-the-Shoulder” squirrel. Beneath the animal are the three words, “original / Eickhorn / Solingen”. The original tan felt blade washer is in place showing only a little age but no wear.

A very nice, untouched naval dagger here directly from the veteran family.

Excellent Plus, Plus. $1,495.00