Wittmann Alder Wittmann Militaria 1st & 2nd Model Naval (Kriegsmarine) Dagger Section
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The German Navy or Kriegsmarine officially carried daggers as early as the 1840's and continued to wear edged weapons throughout the Third Reich Period. Most collectors are concerned with 3rd Reich Naval Dirks which are referred to as 1st and 2nd Model Naval Patterns.

Naval dirks were normally produced of gilded brass fittings and scabbard, with white grip and bright blade often having nautical theme etchings. The scabbard was produced with a engraved lighting bolt pattern or had a hammered finish. The so-called 1st Model, actually a Model 1929, was equipped with a round pommel top. After 1938, Naval Dirks received a pommel change which depicted a closed-winged eagle which clutched a wreathed swastika. These dirks are often found with a portepee, i.e. a decorative tassel wrapped about the grip.



NVL12 #38394 2nd Model Naval Dagger with Hammered Scabbard & Mustard Grip – WKC

This 2nd Model Naval Dagger is a real looker and very desirable. The dagger is equipped with textbook WKC hilt mounts, being the same as those I show on pages 269 and 270 of my Navy Book.

The pommel is an outstanding example, showing little to no wear whatsoever. It has very fine detailing throughout the eagle. This pommel also retains most of the original gilding.

The crossguard also retains much of the original gilding. It features two fouled anchor center blocks and has quillons that depict raised acanthus leaves. The button ends are in good condition, with fine handwork and crisp nipples.

This dagger is equipped with a mustard colored grip constructed from solid celluloid. This color is rarely seen on Naval daggers and is very desirable. The grip is in perfect condition throughout, and is tightly wrapped with twisted brass wires.

I had an extra nylon portepee which I added to this dagger. This nylon knit is still in choice condition and is properly tied in a double reef knot.

The scabbard of this dagger is a real beauty. It is the hammered type and retains all of the original gilded finish. There is a tiny slope dent on the obverse bottom but beyond this it is prefect. The bands are high off the surface and show no wear, being finely decorated with oak leaves and acorns. This scabbard looks exactly look the piece I show on page 271 of my book. This example has plain eyelets are opposed to the engraved style; we see this sometimes on WKC pieces. The carrying rings also retain traces of their original gilding. The throat is retained by a pair of dome head screws which are unturned.

The double etched blade of this dagger is as nice as you could hope to see. It has a fine nickel-plated finish with 100% of the frosting in the backgrounds of the foul anchor etch. This blade retains a needle-like tip and is easily in mint condition. The obverse ricasso of the blade is deeply stamped with the Knight Head trademark of the WKC firm, and the original red felt blade buffer is in place.

A really fine 2nd Model Naval Dagger here.

Mint Minus. $2,195.00

NVL12 #38436C 2nd Model Naval Dagger – E. & F. Hörster

This 2nd Model Naval Dagger is a classic E. & F. Hörster piece. The hilt mounts are of high quality brass and retain about 60% of the original gilding. The pommel and crossguard are the same as the example I show on pages 282 and 283 of my Navy Book.

The pommel has excellent detail through the head and breast feathering of the eagle. There is lots of gilding left in the recesses of the half-open wings of the bird. The wreath is nicely vaulted and also retains some gilding.

The crossguard is the type with large nipples on the quillon ends. The acanthus leaves are expertly engraved and the center blocks have the traditional fouled anchor motif.

The grip of this dagger is an off-white example. It is a beauty, in perfect condition and tightly wrapped with twisted brass wire.

Adorning the hilt is an outstanding silver bullion Naval portepee. This portepee remains in absolutely perfect condition and is set in the the proper Naval tie. The note is nicely toned throughout and really adds much to the look of this piece. The slide and stem have the silver “V” braiding, and the lower ball has the “cat's anus” style stuffing.

The scabbard is the style with the very larger eyelets, used by Hörster and a handful of other makers. There is an identical scabbard shown on the piece I show on page 284 of my book. This scabbard is nice and straight but for a few tiny pitches on the lower area. It is the lightning bolt style, with good stampings to the palmettes around the bands, as well as the lightning bolt, ermine feet and acanthus leaves seen at the bottom. The bands are decorated with a pattern of overlapping oak leaves and acorns. The large eyelets are triple serrated with sleeved edges. The throat is retained by a pair of dome head screws.

The blade is a real winner, having mirror-bright nickel plating. The gray backgrounds which surround the fouled anchor etch are 100% intact. This blade retains a needle-like tip and is easily in full mint condition, being etched with the Hörster “H” logo. The original leather blade washer is in place.

An outstanding Naval example in a natural state.

Excellent Plus, Plus. $1,395.00

NVL12 #37953C Imperial Model 1902 Naval Dirk with Shortened Scabbard

We often see with Imperial Naval dirks shortened scabbards, as the original examples from 1890 where made with a standard length long scabbard. Rather than discard a long scabbard they were simply cut down. This identical piece can be seen in my Navy Book on page 103. In the scabbard this piece measures about 14 inches long.

The pommel is the style with high finials that have serrated edges. These finials support an orb and a cross at the top. The six domed shields that surround the pommel are all pebbled, alternating between designs of Prussian eagles and crosses. The pommel shows minor traces of wear. This pommel was pinned to the tang by the manufacturer and as such this dirk cannot betaken down.

The crossguard below features fouled anchor center blocks, and the four-sided quillons have panels filled with fine pebbling. The quillons terminate in stylized capstans.

The grip is a very pretty genuine Elfenbein, still being in perfect condition. There are some very attractive striations on both sides, with tones and gold and graining throughout the entire grip. This grip is wrapped with twisted brass wire.

The scabbard has been shortened to about 10 ¾ inches. It is interesting to note that the scabbard, at one time, was a lightning bolt variety. The bolts, however, have all been peened over. Further, the bands were once the guilloche style but they too have been peened over to match the shell. Even the eyelets and carrying rings have been peened. A very interesting scabbard here; it really speaks to you of the history of this dirk. The throat is retained by two dome head brass screws.

The fine Damascus blade is about 9 ½ inches long. It has a very nice, subtle Maiden Hair pattern that gently flows the length of both sides. The blade has double fullers and a ricasso. I see no age on this blade and it looks to be nearly mint to me. It is buffered by a red felt pad.

A very nice, historical piece here!

Excellent Plus. $4,945.50

NVL12 #37947C “Heavy” Naval Dirk – W. K. & C. / G.B. & S.

This extremely rare Naval Dirk is of immense proportions; it is about 1/3 again the size of a standard Imperial dirk. It measures close to 18 inches in the scabbard. These “heavy” types were available through the W. K. & C. catalog beginning in 1895. The could be purchased by virtually anyone qualified to wear a dagger, provided they had deep enough pockets to afford it! You can see some examples of this type of dirk pictured in my Navy Book on pages 66 through 77.

The pommel of this dirk is very large, having an open finial top. The finial arms are beautifully rendered, with notches running along the upper sections and terminating in a crown-topped royal orb. The area below the pommel cap is hand checkered. The pommel features eight dome-shaped shields running about the perimeter. Each of these shields has a beaded border, and alternately depicts a Prussian eagle and a cross. The pommel has a hole drilled into the collar area which once held a set screw. This screw is no longer present so the pommel easily screws out for a look at the tang; we'll talk about this a bit later.

The crossguard is also huge, featuring very large center blocks on both sides. Each block depicts an outstanding, raised fouled anchor and has a pebbled backgrounds to add a sense of depth. The guard arms are four-sided and end in stylized capstans. These capstans are nicely executed, with fine hand-applied accents.

The grip is of genuine Elfenbein. It remains in perfect condition throughout and is most impressive. It has a fine golden tone and is shot through with beautiful grains that run through the segments. It has no chips or problems, and is wrapped with a thick, twisted silver wire.

There is a fine portepee tied to the hilt. It has rather large proportions; it is most likely a sword portepee. This Imperial knot looks terrific on this piece, being just the right size to complement the large dimensions of the dirk. The cord is of silver bullion with specks of red and black running throughout. The slide and stem are of woven silver material, with a “V” pattern to the weave. The lower silver bullion ball has a stuffing of black, white and red threads.

The scabbard of this dirk shows some traces of use but has no dings or dents. This huge scabbard is constructed of very fine brass, and much of the original gilding clings to the protected areas around the throat and bands. It is in the lightning bolt pattern, with palmettes on either side of the bands. The lower area of the scabbard features stamped lightning bolts, ermine feet, and very large acanthus leaves that have all been hand rendered. The bands are rope-like, with a figure eight knots on the obverse and reverse. The eyelets also have the look of rope, as do the carrying rings. The throat is retained by two brass flat head screws.

The blade is also very large and constructed of very fine, genuine Damascus. The blade is in excellent condition throughout, having no pitting or problems, and being done in a fine, prominent Maiden Hair pattern. It has double fullers and a ricasso, and measures about 11 ¾ inches long. It easily approaches mint condition. The blade lock consists of spring material tapered to catch within the throat once the dagger is placed in the scabbard. The obverse blade is marked with the popular turn of the century distributor “G. B. & S”. Their logo, consisting of a crossed swords, is placed atop the firm's initials.

The tang of the blade is stamped “M+D”. This marking identifies the smith as Max Dinger, the father of the famous Third Reich Damascus smith Paul Dinger. The mounts throughout are also number marked. The original leather blade buffer is in place on this dirk.

A fantastic dirk here for the advanced Naval collector; very few of these heavy examples were produced and I have not seen one for sale for many years. This is an amazing opportunity to acquire a real treasure for your collection.

Excellent Plus. $20,695.50

NVL12 #37944C 1890 Long Cadet Dirk with Extra Features

This beautiful 1890 Cadet Dirk has many extra features and would have been considered a deluxe model. The dirk is quite long, measuring about 19 ½ inches overall, measured in the scabbard. The standard pattern can been seen on page 51 ofmy Navy Book, and you can also see a deluxe model pommel on page 50, similar to the one seen on this example.

The pommel is really impressive, having high, serrated finials that rise off the top. The finials act to support an orb and cross on the upper portion. The area below these finials is all hand checkered. The pommel features six domed panels that run about the circumference, each with a beaded border. The panels alternated between designs of a Prussian eagle and a cross.

The crossguard of this dirk is a standard type, the same as is show on page 53 of my book. This crossguard has the two fouled anchor emblazoned center blocks, set against a randomly pebbled background. The quillon arms are four-sided and end in stylized capstans. These capstans have been nicely hand enhanced.

The grip of this dirk is a very fine genuine Elfenbein. There is a small crack on the upper portion on the reverse under the pommel, but it is very minor. Other than this it is in nearly perfect condition, with a few attractive crack lines near the bottom segment. The grip has taken on a golden tone on the obverse, just slightly lighter in color on the reverse. Many times these 1890 dirks will have hand-cut ribs with no wire. In the case of this example there is a deluxe treatment of a twisted triple strands of brass wire, the center wire being of a thicker gauge for a nice contrast. The age of this dirk is evident in the amount of residue trapped by the skein of grip wire.

The extra-long scabbard also has some nice treatment. It is dent free and is in the lightning bolt pattern. The palmettes have had extra engravings applied to them, giving them an almost floral appearance. The lower portion of the scabbard has well defined lightning bolts, large ermine feet that resemble four leaf clovers and more acanthus leaves. These leaves are also slightly different than we normally see. The carrying bands are the standard guilloche type that gives the impression of rope. The eyelets are the style with a large center rim and are engraved to resemble ropes. The throat is retained by two large brass side screws.

The beautiful blade is 13 ½ inches long, being of genuine Damascus, with dual fullers and a ricasso. The Damascus is quite exciting, being in a band pattern. The blade shows signs of normal with no pits or problems and the patterns remain outstanding. The obverse ricasso has the raised monogram of the original owner. It appears to read, “FC”. The reverse ricasso has a raised ribbon that bears the raised-out words “Aecht Damst”. Normally we don't see the “A” attached to the word “echt”, but in this case it is present. The release lock is the style with a spring that has been shaped to retain the blade when the dirk is in the scabbard. The original red felt washer is in place.

I took a look at the tang of this dirk. It is deeply stamped “Echter Damascener” as well as “2” and “7”. These same numbers are also stamped on to the lower guard. The pommel has an “8” stamped inside it.

A high quality, extra-cost dirk, obviously the property of a well-to-do cadet. Chances are this dirk was also worn after the cadet became an officer. A beautiful item here, and worthy of any advanced Naval collection.

Excellent Plus. $8,095.50

NVL12 #37945C Imperial 1902 Naval Dirk – W. K. & C.

This fine Imperial Naval Dirk is the 1902 Pattern with some custom features. Overall it measures 13 ½ inches long. This identical dirk appears on page 119 of my Navy Book.

The pommel is one of the extra-cost, high finial types. These finials are way up there, with finely serrated edges supporting the orb and cross at the top. The upper portion of the pommel is hand checkered. The six domed shields that surround the pommel are all pebbled, alternating between designs of Prussian eagles and crosses.

The crossguard is the standard Imperial style, having some nice laurel leaves shown in the neck area above the center blocks. The center blocks bear the usual fouled anchors on both sides, set against randomly pebbled backgrounds. The four-sided guard arms end in stylized capstans which also have the same leaf decoration as the upper neck of the guard. It is also interesting to note that the bottom of the pommel has this unique leaf design.

The grip is a very pretty genuine Elfenbein example. There are a couple of surface chips on the upper segment and one on the bottom right segment, all very minor. The grip has an age crack in the center obverse and, on the reverse, has nice gold toning that is slightly darker than the obverse. The grip is tightly wrapped with thick, twisted silver wire.

The scabbard is the type that was offered by the August Lüneberg firm as Model #337. This scabbard has reed and cattail designs which are above and below the carrying bands. The lower portion has reed and cattails that extend into fine sea plants at the very base. Very beautiful engraving here, and something not seen very often. The bands are the style with borders and, in the center, have raised laurel leaves and berries. The leaves extend to the surfaces of the eyelets and the carrying rings are in a rope-like pattern. The throat is retained by two headless screws.

The fine genuine Damascus blade measures just short of 9 inches. It is a beautiful blade, in nearly full mint condition and with an attractive Maiden Hair pattern. The ricasso with slanted edges where it meets the blade. It also has dual fullers and a needle-like tip. The obverse blade is stamped with the turn of the century W. K. & C. Knight Head trademark, and the original tan felt blade buffer is in place.

A very fine piece here, a superior example of the type.

Excellent Plus. $6,295.50

NVL12 #37946C Imperial 1902 Naval Dirk – W. K. & C. / G.B. & S.

This very fine 1902 Imperial Naval Dirk measures just shy of 14 inches overall. It has an array of extra-cost features, the first being the high finial pommel. These finials extend well off the pommel top, having serrated edges and supporting a royal orb and crown. The upper portion of the pommel top is deeply checkered. The six domed shields that ring the pommel present alternating designs of Prussian eagles and crosses. Each of these has a pebbled border.

The crossguard has the usual pair of fouled anchor center blocks. The guard arms are four-sided, each having a panel with a hammered finish. This hammered finish was an optional, extra-cost upgrade.

The grip of this dirk is a fine genuine Elfenbein, with a golden tone that grows deeper on the reverse. The grip has a most attractive series of striations which run down the edges of both sides. There are no chips or problems with this grip, and it is tightly wrapped with twisted brass wire.

The scabbard is a hammered type, matching the detailing seen on the quillons. It is straight throughout, with just a touch of age on the lower reverse; nothing serious, though. A good deal of the original gilding remains on this scabbard. The bands are wider than normal, embellished with a pattern of raised oak leaf sprigs. The eyelets are the style with a large center area engraved with rope-like patterns. The throat is retained by two dome head screws.

The Damascus blade of this dirk measures nearly 9 inches long. It is in a most beautiful Maiden Hair pattern, still very prominent and in nearly mint condition. There is a ricasso with slanted borders where it meets the blade. The blade, of course, has dual fuller construction. The obverse ricasso is marked with the logo of the distributor, a pair of crossed swords. Beneath these blades we see “G. B. & S.”. On the opposite side is a W. K. & C. Knight Head logo, looking to be of a 1912-13 vintage. The blade is protected by an in place brown leather washer.

A good, clean Model 1902 here.

Excellent Plus. $6,295.50

NVL12 #37621C Model 1872 Kriegsmarine Applicanten Dirk – E. & F. Hörster

This beautiful Kriegsmarine Applicanten Dirk is an outstanding condition that belies its considerable age. The hilt is basically a one piece unit, with the grip and crossguard of a single brass casting. The gilded finish throughout the hilt still appears to be in 100% condition. The pommel portion of the grip is rounded and is positioned to the left side. The combined backstrap and pommel run vertically down to the crossguard. On the left side of the grip there are ribs, built into the casting, which act as a hand grip.

The crossguard has a smooth center block on the reverse, while on the obverse center there is an intricately rendered Imperial crown. The crown has three domed shields at the front, with fine simulated finials rising up to hold an orb topped with a cross. The guard quillons are shaped not unlike a bowling pin, and are rounded at the ends.

Below the center block is a separate piece consisting of a folding clamshell. This clamshell bears a raised-out, detailed fouled anchor with random pebbling scattered around it. This anchor has very realistic ropes around the anchor shaft and flukes. I also note that the number “01” is stamped on the reverse of the clamshell fitting.

The scabbard is of leather which has been decorated with twin lines that run down the edges of both sides. The reverse has sewn-up seam. The leather throughout is still extremely supple and shows little age. The scabbard mounts are plain, the upper example having a long lug for the attachment of a frog. The lower mount has twin lines decorating the obverse. Both have scalloped edges where they meet the leather shell, and are retained by numbered staples.

The 13 inch blade is really a pleasure to gaze upon. It is in nearly complete Mint condition, being a slab-sided type with a ricasso. It is double etched. The etch is in new-like condition, with 100% of the original frosted backgrounds. The lower etch depicts a fully-rigged sailing ship, ensigns flying and bearing down on the viewer. Above this, in the center, is an Imperial crown set atop a fouled anchor. The etch ends with floral designs as well as a cannon, drum, and standartes.

The reverse etch also has the sailing ship, this time off the ricasso. This ship has visible portholes and even a smoke stack sticking up through the masts, which is the type of hybrid ship in use during this period of German naval history. In the center is an Imperial crown over a fouled anchor. The etch ends on the upper area with a cannon, standartes, and a trident. A very beautiful blade here, and quite historic with the striking etches of the time.

The ricasso is stamped with the producer of this examples in tow lines, “E. & F. Hörster / Solingen”. The original brown leather washer is in choice condition, in place and still protecting the blade after all these years.

Applicanten Dirks are extremely difficult to find; they were worn by candidates circa 1872 and onward. Around the turn of the century, paymasters also adopted these Applicanten style dirks, however they usually has much more elaborate mounts than this plain and simple type. If you are working on an Imperial Naval collection, this example will make an outstanding addition. You are not likely to find an better conditioned dirk.

Near Mint. $3,145.50

NVL12 #37620C 1st Model 1929 Naval Dagger – Alcoso

This is an extremely rare dagger which is also in extremely rare condition. Alcoso did not produce many Naval Daggers and it is quite a privilege to be able to offer this example.

The hilt mounts still have 100% of the gilded surface over the fine brass base. The pommel Is the round style which has been peened over the top so the dagger does not take down. The pommel features the cattail and reed motif which are positioned over a set of cresting waves at the bottom. It has been hand-enhanced throughout the design.

The crossguard is the narrow style that we see on these early daggers. The obverse depicts a fouled anchor which has fine pebbling surrounding it. The reverse center block has a diamond with rays emanating from it, a hallmark of Alcoso that we also see on their Third Reich daggers. The quillon arms have beautiful, highly accented acanthus leaves on those sides and end in fine lined buttons with nipple tips.

The grip of this dagger appears to be of carved wood covered in a fine celluloid. This celluloid has toned to a beautiful, ivory-like color, and remains in perfect condition. This grip is tightly wrapped twist gilded brass wire.

The scabbard is just terrific. It is completely dent-free and also has the original gilded finish. It is in the lightning bolt motif, with palmettes around the bands. Further down are the lightning bolts and a pair of ermine feet. At the bottom are the highly detailed acanthus leaves; another hallmark of Alcoso construction appears is evident in the points on these leaves. The bands are extremely appealing, with rope knots on both sides. The rope has been hand-enhanced for further realism. This enhancement extends to the eyelets, and the carrying rings are plain. The throat is retained by two flat head brass screws.

The blade of this dagger is most desirable. It is in Mint condition and is double etched, featuring the sailing ship motif. It retains a needle-like tip and has 100% of the frosting behind the etched pattern. The obverse depicts a fully rigged sailing ship, flying ensigns and sailing on a bed of sea plants. This ship is highly detailed and a pleasure to study. Above the ship is a fouled anchor, and the etch finishes with floral designs.

On the opposite side the sailing ship motif is repeated but it positioned higher on the blade, eliminating the fouled anchor. On the obverse ricasso is the early Alcoso scales trademark. The scales have the initials “ACS” interspersed. This style of trademark preceded the design used during the Third Reich. There is a fine reddish blade buffer in place.

If you have been looking to complete your Naval collection, or perhaps just add a very choice piece and encompass two periods in history, this dirk is highly recommended. Apparently the original owner of this piece retired prior to the Nazi era, and, because of this, saved a real treasure for future collectors.

Near Mint. $2,605.50

NVL12 #37628C Transitional Imperial Naval Dirk with Elfenbein Grip, Damascus Blade and Period Photograph – Carl Eickhorn

This naval dirk is extremely historical, especially with the original documentation. These documents show the original owner, an admiral, surrendering the dagger to a US Army Major. In the photograph the dagger is without question the piece I am offering here; the capstan guard and the fray on the portepee are easily visible and a dead giveaway as to the identity of the piece. The admiral looks extremely tired in the picture, which is understandable, but his bearing is resolute. Perhaps one of your research-minded types could identify him. The US Major is a member of the Signal Corps, as evidenced by this marking in the corner of the photo. Further, he wears the helmet of a Major and stands with a holstered 45 as he accepts the dirk. This is truly a wonderful photograph!

The dirk is an Imperial example that has been upgraded to Third Reich specifications. Obviously the surrendering admiral purchased this dagger prior to World War I. The dagger is equipped with the 1937 changeover pommel. If you are not familiar with this type of pommel you can see an example on page 229 of my Navy Book which is identical. These changeover pommels have a much deeper recess at the opening of the wings. Additionally the head of the bird is extremely detailed, with a beautiful eye, beak, and protruding brow. Because of the deep recesses in the wings, the wreath which surrounds the swastika is also highly vaulted. When the '37 pommel was introduced, Naval officers owning daggers from other eras where not required to change it out, although most opted to install the new variant. The pommel still has some of the original gilding in the recess.

The crossguard is the original Imperial type. It features fouled anchors on both sides of the center block, nicely raised with fine randomly pebbled backgrounds. The guards have four-sided quillon arms which end in a simulated capstans at the tip. A capstan, of course, is a device used on ships to apply tension to ropes and cables. It is a species of windlass, only with a vertical instead of a horizontal axle. It resembles the hub of a wheel with (usually) four spokes, each of which would be pushed by a sailor.

There is an outstanding Elfenbein grip on this dagger. This beautiful grip has toned to a golden color and appears to be completely intact with no chips or cracks. It is tightly wrapped with a skein of twisted brass wire.

It is also interesting to not that, internally, the lower guard is marked “4”. Looking at the grip we see four notches at the top, which ties in nicely. The tang itself is stamped “579”. On the opposite side of the tang we see the traditional Eickhorn markings that we also see on Third Reich Damascus pieces, “DAMAST”.

Wrapped about the hilt of this dirk is the original silver bullion Naval portepee. This portepee has some fraying at the top loop on both sides and where the cord exits the loops of the reef knot. This is good as it matches the example shown in the accompanying picture, making for easy identification. The slide and stem have the tradition woven “V” design and the silver bullion ball below has the “cat's anus” style stuffing. Overall a really great hilt here, one that speaks to you of three distinct periods of German naval history.

The scabbard shell is the pebbled type and it is completely dent free. The scabbard bands are a narrow, overlapping oak leaf type, and have interspersed acorns. The oak leaves have lots of hand-enhancement, as do the eyelets which bear the same pattern. A very nice touch here. It is also interesting to note that the upper eyelet is nearly worn through from the weight of carrying this dagger for all of those years. A great thing to see here, as this dagger is indeed quite heavy and one can only imagine the stress placed on the eyelet and carrying ring while the dagger was swinging about year after year. The rings are also hammered to match the scabbard. The throat is retained by two brass dome head screws which appear unturned.

The blade is an outstanding “Damaststahl” in the Maiden Hair pattern. It is a beautiful blade which remains in Mint condition. It has double fullers and a ricasso, the reverse of which is stamped with the Eickhorn Imperial marking of back to back squirrels with the initials “CE” beneath. The original reddish felt blade buffer is still in place, showing some wear to the edges but still looking great.

To me this is a dirk that that serious Naval collector has just got to have; it is a wonderful piece that spans three periods of German naval history. Looking at this amazing dagger simultaneously in-hand and in the photograph of the moment of the surrender one can't help but think, “It just doesn't get better than this!".

Excellent Plus. $6,295.50

NVL12 #37624C Hamburg Harbor Naval Dirk with Straps

This Naval Dirk is extremely rare, being carried by Naval officials who were in charge of guarding Hamburg Harbor. There was a need for this, especially during the war, as a great many important naval assets and vital supply ships were berthed there. It is very similar to the example I show in my Navy Book on pages 152 and 153, except that this one is of a later vintage than the book piece and appears to be virtually unissued.

The dagger has no maker mark, probably because it was ordered by the navy for this specific purpose and would have been an issued piece of gear. Looking closely at the hilt parts and scabbard, it appears to have been the work of the WKC firm.

The hilt and scabbard have a base of outstanding brass, and they literally have 100% of the original gilded finish throughout the surfaces; if you want to see a good looking Naval dagger with highest interest stampings, this piece is really something and read on.

The pommel has outstanding detail to the eagle, to include the details to the head and breast feathering. The swastika is raised out of wreath clutched by the bird, and the wings are nicely folded outward.

The crossguard is the standard type used by WKC, having the fouled anchors on both sides of the center blocks and acanthus leaves decorating the crossguard arms. The button ends are nicely enhanced, with fine nipple tips.

The grip of this dagger is constructed with a base of carved wood which has been covered with celluloid. This celluloid has toned nicely with age and it remains in perfect condition. It is tightly wrapped with twisted wire of gilded brass.

The dagger is equipped with a beautifully patinated silver bullion Naval portepee. This portepee is in perfect condition, matching that of the dagger. The Naval reef knot is set in place and could not look any better. The stem and slide have the usual “V” pattern to the thread. The lower ball is of silver bullion thread with a “cat's anus” style stuffing.

The scabbard that accompanies this dagger is as straight as an arrow and is in perfect condition, with a 100% intact gilded finish. It features the lightning bolt pattern, having palmettes on either side of both of the carrying bands. At the lower end we see a pattern of lightning bolts and highly detailed ermine feet, with equally detailed acanthus leaves below. The bands feature a pattern of overlapping oak leaves and acorns and are in pristine condition. The eyelets are the triple serrated type and are also free of any sort of wear. There is also quite a bit of gilding left on the carrying rings, an indication that this dagger was only used sparingly, if ever.

The blade of this piece is a plain type, having the typical dual fuller construction seen on Naval pieces. Since this dagger would have most likely been an NCO version and ordered by the Navy, an etched blade would have been forgone to keep costs low. The original reddish felt buffer is in place.

The most interesting part about this dagger, though, are the stampings. The stampings that appear on the reverse blade ricasso as well as the reverse scabbard are, at the top, “Hamburg” stamped in a downward arch. Below this is an open-winged Naval eagle clutching a mobile swastika. Looking to the lower left we see a Naval proofing property stamp which consists of a Wiemar-style eagle over the letter “M”. To the right is the number “27”, which was assigned to this particular piece. It is interesting to note that the Weimar eagle atop an “M” along with a Nazi naval stamping is proof that this Weimar eagle was used well into the Nazi period.

Accompanying this dagger is a set of full Mint Kriegsmarine hangers. These hangers have the lined satin moire straps and are covered in a black velvet on the reverse. The strapping throughout is totally perfect. The buckles are the dual Lion Mask type, and the snaps are matching gilded aluminum. The snaps appear to show that this dagger may have been worn once or twice but that is about it.

This is an opportunity to acquire an ultra-rare dagger in tip-top condition, one not to be missed by the advanced Naval collector.

Mint. $4,495.50(#062716)

NVL12 #37638C Model 1921 Naval Officer's Dirk – WKC

This Model 1921 Naval Officer's Dirk was the first so-called officer's dagger to be produced after the first World War. The 1919 model was worn in a bayonet style steel scabbard. When the the 1921 pattern was introduced many officer's decided to simply purchase a brass scabbard and do away with the old steel one.

This particular piece, however, appears to have been purchased as an entire unit. This dirk is identical to the example I show on page 194 of my Navy Book. The hilt has mounts of fine brass. The pommel is in the shape of a ball which depicts reeds and cattails mounted over cresting waves. This pommel is peened into place and therefore this dagger cannot be taken down.

The crossguard is the new style developed after WW1, with button quillon ends that have nippled centers. Although this piece has an original portepee covering most of the obverse crossguard there is a center block which features a fouled anchor. As a carryover from the Imperial days the reverse guard features a floral design.; this would change with the Model 1921. This crossguard has a drilled blade release button which is centered in guard. The quillon arms have acanthus leaves on both sides and, as stated above, the ends are button-like with extended nipples in the middle.

The grip of this piece is black and appears to be made of horn. It is beautifully shaped and remains in perfect condition, with ribs that run downward from right to left. The grip is tightly wrapped in springy gilded wire.

As stated above there is an original-to-the-piece silver bullion portepee attached to this dirk. This portepee has long since toned to a golden hue from age. It is completely set in the Naval reef tie, and is the variety with a larger cord. Much of the cord covers the crossguard area because of the large size. This knot shows a little wear on the reverse upper loop and lower loops. There is also mild wear to one side of the reef knot and some fray where the cord comes out of the tie. This all sounds bad but actually the knot looks great on this dagger. The slide is still there although the bullion cord is worn on this part, and the stem is in good condition with the “V style bullion weave. The ball below is the silver bullion type with a “cat's anus” stuffing.

The accompanying scabbard is a real beauty, having a choice hammered finish. This scabbard is totally straight throughout and appears to have much of the original gilded finish. The carrying bands are shaped in a simulated knot on both sides, and the bands are also cut to resemble ropes. The rope-like design continues through the eyelets, and the two carrying rings are also in this design. The throat is retained by a single dome head brass screw on the right side.

The blade is a very fine example, being plain as we normally see on dirks of this vintage. It has an outstanding nickel-plated finish and is easily in full Mint condition, with double fullers and a needle-like tip. The obverse is stamped with the Knight Head trademark of WKC, but does not have the firm's initials beneath; this would indicate it is the 1920's version trademark. The original brown leather washer is in place.

A key dirk here if you are collecting Naval types. This 1921 Models are very difficult to come by, especially in this kind of superior condition.

Near Mint. $2,605.50

NVL12 #37630C 2nd Model Naval Dagger with Elfenbein Grip, Hand Chased Scabbard, Portepee and Damascus Blade

This 2nd Model Naval Dagger is one of the most beautiful examples you will ever see. It is in nearly full Mint condition throughout and has all of the extra upgrades that were available at the time.

The hilt mounts are exceptional, being constructed of high quality brass with nearly 100% of their original gilded finish. These mounts appear to be the variety that was produced by Carl Eickhorn, but in the case of a special order dagger such as this one the mounts may have been purchased by the Damascus smith.

The pommel is a beauty, with all detailing to the bird's head and breast feathering and good, raised wreath with a mobile swastika inside. The crossguard features the traditional fouled anchors on both sides and the arms are decorated on both sides with acanthus leaves. The crossguard ends have good, accented buttons with nipples in the center.

The genuine Elfenbein grip is in outstanding condition. This grip has no cracks or chips anywhere. The obverse has a light golden color with some attractive grain evenly spread through the surfaces. The reverse of the grip is slightly lighter in color and has an interesting faint line that runs down the center, perhaps caused by the presence the portepee.

The portepee is a most impressive silver bullion example tied in the Naval reef knot. It is in perfect condition, exactly matching the fine condition of the rest of the dirk. The slide and stem have the distinctive “V” pattern, and the lower ball is of yarn-like bullion thread with a “cat's anus” insert.

The scabbard is similarly remarkable. It is completely hand chased with a pattern that I can't recall ever having seen in the past. It consists of a series of floral designs set in panels with curved, raised border around them. These floral embellishments seem to be laurel with large size berries. The center area between the two bands has a pebbled oval design. The lower portion of the scabbard has more of the laurel-like floral designs, and a smaller oval mimicking the larger one seen above. A good portion of the original gilding remains on the surfaces of this scabbard; it is very beautiful indeed!

The scabbard bands feature an “X” shaped design, as well as more laurel leaves that jut outward from this marking. There are exaggerated berries in the upper and lower portions of this “X”. The eyelet is also hand engraved to flow with the rest of the scabbard designs. The rings have small, hand-engraved laurel leaves with nice accents to the veins. The throat is retained by two dome head brass side screws.

The blade of this dagger is a hand-forged Damascus example in a Maiden Hair pattern. There are a few swirls in the design at the ricasso areas as well as the inner areas of the double ridges. This blade is in perfect condition, and the pattern-welded designs immediately attract the eye of the viewer. The tip on this blade remains needle-like.

The reverse ricasso of the blade has the blade lock but is otherwise unmarked. The tang of the blade is stamped with the producer, Dinger; his initials are stamped into the metal, “P+D”. The original blade washer is a red felt example, with some wear to the lower edge but basically still intact.

A splendid Naval Dagger here, which would easily be a highlight in an advanced Naval collection.

Near Mint. $10,795.50

NVL12 #37669C Half Size Mess Dress Naval Dirk with Third Reich Pommel

The Half Size WKC Dirk has always been a very popular item with serious Naval collectors. WKC made these pieces beginning in the Imperial period continuing unabated through the Wiemar Republic. They only made a few during the Nazi period, this example being one of them, and is considered ultra-rare. I know of only a couple of these examples that survived. This piece is more or less identical to the piece that I show on page 508 of my Navy Book. The dirk was most likely intended to be a desk ornament, but the craftsmanship, balance, and attention to detail is so perfect that it would not be impossible for one of these dirks to have been worn to a gala accompanying a dress uniform.

The dirk measures just about 11 inches in length. The pommel is an incredible example, with full detailing to the eagle. The bird has the half-opened wings with excellent simulated feathering. The head has a highly detailed eye, and the beak which points to the viewer's left. The breast of the bird has been hand-enhanced and checkered. The talons are also hand-enhanced, grasping a wreath with a raised mobile swastika. Some amazing work here, which is just as incredible on the reverse of the pommel. An extremely rare sight here, which few of us will ever get to see.

The crossguard is the Imperial capstan type, as the WKC firm never revised this design. The only changes they made to these small dirks was to the pommel, which evolved as the regimes rose and fell. This guard has a beautiful gilded finish and features fouled anchor center blocks. The quillon arms are the four sided type which flare outward into capstan ends.

The grip is most beautiful, being a very, very dark orange. It remains in perfect condition and is tightly wrapped with twisted gilded brass wire.

The scabbard is a lightning bolt variety, with bands in the more Imperial style. This scabbard is the same as the piece I show on page 508 of my Navy Book. The scabbard is stamped palmette designs over and under the carrying bands. The bands are the raised variety, having fluted surfaces running vertically and with a border. Raised out of the bands is a design of oak leaves and acorns. The lower portion of the scabbard bears the traditional lightning bolts, ermine feet, and pointed, highly detailed acanthus leaves.

The blade is a full Mint plain type, having double fullers and a needle-like tip. It has a high quality nickel-plated surface and is quite beautiful. These blades were also offered in a etched design, as was the case with the example I show on page 508 of my book. The obverse ricasso has the deeply stamped Knight Head trademark of the WKC firm.

This is a golden opportunity to acquire one of the rarest of all Third Reich produced edged weapons; one not to be missed, wallet permitting!

Near Mint. $7,195.50

NVL12 #37673C Imperial Half Size Mess Dress Naval Dirk – W. K. & C.

This diminutive Mess Dress Naval Dirk is extremely beautiful and delicate. It measures only about 9¾ inches, yet it complete with all of the details seen on its larger counterpart. It was most likely meant to be worn as part of evening or dining dress when a full sized dirk would have proved too cumbersome. This dirk amazing detail throughout, and the gilded surfaces are 100% intact. A picture of a similar dirk can be seen in the Johnson/Wittmann Imperial book on pages 67 and 68.

The pommel cap is an absolute stunner; it has very high serrated finials which act to support a cross-topped orb. The upper portion of the pommel below the finials is diamond checkered with dots punched into the center of each figure. The eight domed shields which ring the pommel are also of extreme detail, having raised pebbled patterns around each border as well as alternating designs of crosses and Prussian eagles. The workmanship is absolutely fabulous.

The crossguard is the capstan type, also displaying superior workmanship. The center blocks both have detailed fouled anchors with random background pebbling. The four sided quillon arms stretch outward to end in bell-shaped capstans which are also hand-enhanced.

Completing the outrageous spectacle of the hilt is a genuine Elfenbein grip. This grip has six sections and spirals downward and to the left. It is in superb condition with no flaws anywhere, and is tightly wrapped with twisted silver wire.

The scabbard is an exact miniature of the Imperial Naval lightning bolt design. It has stamped palmette designs over and under the carrying bands. The lower portion of the scabbard bears the traditional lightning bolts, ermine feet, and pointed, highly detailed acanthus leaves. Even the edges above the acanthus leaves also have ermine feet stamped into them. The bands are high off the surface of the scabbard and in the guilloche style, simulating the look of looped rope. The eyelets are plain surfaced and are equipped with miniature carrying rings.

The magnificent blade is nearly 5 inches long. It has high quality, nickel-plated surfaces with a needle-like tip. The blade has a center ridge formation rather than the double fullers we see on the full size version. The ricasso is fairly long, and is stamped with the early W. K. & C. Knight Head trademark. This early stamping dates this dirk to somewhere around the turn of the last century. The original, new-like brown leather washer is in place.

If you are looking for something gorgeous and jewel-like to add to your desk or perhaps display with other Imperial Naval artifacts, this little dirk is a real head turner. I believe that these W. K. & C. Mess Dress pieces are the the most delicate and beautiful of the dirks made during the period. A real treasure here!

Mint. $5,035.50

NVL12 #37645C 1848 Prussian Naval Dirk

The 1848 Prussian Naval Dirk was the first official pattern introduced for wear. The next 100 years of naval dagger designs are based on this 1948 pattern. If you are not familiar with these daggers I suggest you read the chapter in my Imperial book that details them; there are several pieces shown there that are similar to this dagger. In particular the piece shown on page 12 is nearly identical except for the shape of the grips.

This dirk has a ball pommel decorated with very highly detailed cattails and reeds. These reeds have lots of hand-enhanced detail and this pommel is much nicer than those we see used in 1919. The pommel sits atop a series of cresting waves that are in very high relief, also better than those seen from 1919 onward. The pommel is peened over at the top so the dagger cannot be taken down.

The crossguard is the familiar Imperial capstan type, being the first time this design was used. The crossguard consists of a fouled anchor center block on each side. The anchors are highly raised and the rope has been hand-enhanced. Even the shank of the anchor has had hand-enhancement. The backgrounds have random pebbling. The quillon arms are four-sided and flare out at the ends with capstans. These capstans are very crisp and sharp, moreso than the later Imperial style.

The grip is a beautiful genuine Elfenbein which is most probably hand carved. This grip is baluster shaped; it is thicker at the top and thins towards the bottom. There are six ribs cut into this grip. It has toned to a beautiful golden hue on both sides and is slightly lighter on the edges where there are cracks on both sides, giving fine character to the Elfenbein.

The scabbard is also unique to this Prussian dirk. It is nice and straight throughout, having only a couple of the most minor traces of wear. The basic pattern is that of lightning bolts. It has the same sort of palmettes above and below the carrying bands that we see on later dirks, albeit slightly smaller. The same is true at the lower portion of the scabbard where there are rising lightning bolts, with ermine feet below and acanthus leaves at the very bottom. It is interesting to note that the ermine feet go all the way around the scabbard, as do the bolts and the leaves. This is not the case on later issues. The bands are in the guilloche style, again slightly smaller than we normally see. The guilloche style simulated ropes lashed to a pier. The eyelets are small and plain, as are the carrying rings.

The one totally unique aspect of these '48 pieces is the fact that the lower chape is shaped somewhat like an ear. The borders are nice and thick and well defined. If you aren't familiar with this aurifom design you can see a couple of specimens on page 11 of my Navy Book.

The blade of this example is typical of the '48 pattern. It measures 9¼ inches in length and is the style with a center fuller, double edges and a short ricasso. The plain blade is a polished type. It does have some minor age pitting in the few places but overall is it still mostly bright and given the age grades at about Excellent Plus. The release lock was not the type we see later on, but is actually a small piece of steel fashioned into an S-frame that binds against the scabbard throat. One end of the lock is contained within the hilt. The blade has a nice red felt buffer.

These '48 Dirks were worn until the 1860's until there were too many instances of their being used in bar room brawls, et cetera, and they were banned. After the 1902 Pattern Dirk was approved by the Kaiser many of the older officers elected to get their old 1848 Pattern out their sea trunk and wear it again. If you are a naval history buff and a serious collector of Naval Dirk, in my estimation a collection that does not contain one of these pieces is missing one the start of it all! A good investment here, and a very sound, collectible example.

Near Mint. $7,195.50

NVL12 #37636C 1902 Naval Officer's Dirk with Elfenbein Grip, Damascus Blade and Chased Scabbard

The simple act of holding this 1902 Naval Officer's Dirk is stimulating; one cannot help appreciate the beauty of this piece. It is a short style dirk, measuring about 14½ inches overall. It is in outstanding condition throughout, with literally no flaws.

The dirk is constructed of finest quality brass. The pommel is the extra-cost type, with the raised, serrated edge finials. These finials gather at the top, supporting an orb which is in turn topped with a simulated cross. The open area beneath these finials is hand checkered and has little dots in each square. The eight panels that run around the pommel are all beautifully rendered, having raised, pebbled borders that contain alternating crosses and Prussian eagles.

The crossguard is also a matching beauty, having fouled anchors on the center blocks of both sides. The anchors are raised and nicely detailed, with hand applied pebbling in the backgrounds. The quillon arms are the four sided types that end in stylized, bell-shaped capstans at the end.

The grip is a tremendous Elfenbein example. This grip has toned to a golden color and is in nearly perfect condition throughout. There are a few small hairliners that run down the edges of both sides giving the grip the kind of character we like to see.

The scabbard is completely dent-free and shows little evidence of usage, if any. This scabbard has a hand chased design which features a bow motif above the upper band. Below the upper band and on both sides of the lower band are hand engraved oak leaves which are positioned side by side and run around the entire scabbard. These oak leaves have also received hand enhancement on their veins. At the bottom of the scabbard the oak leaf motif is continued with the addition of three beautifully rendered acorns with hand checkered caps. The lower chape has an additional oak leaf. Even the button below has the oak leaf bottom extended to it. Some terrific work here! The scabbard bands have fluted surfaces which run north to south with a raised border on both edges. In the center are raised, overlapping oak leaves which run throughout the band. The eyelets also have hand carved oak leaves, as do the carrying rings.

Drawing the blade is a real pleasure. This blade is a very fine Damascus example, with double fuller construction and a ricasso in the shape of a “V”. The Damascus is in the Maiden Hair pattern and is quite beautiful, being slightly different than we normally see. The blade is completely free of age and remains in Mint condition. The original red felt buffer is in place below the crossguard.

I haven't taken this dagger apart as it is very tight and it would be a shame to loosen the mounts. There is no point in looking inside as this dagger; is what it is.

Near Mint. $5,845.50

NVL12 #37637C Naval Assault Dirk with Nazi Pommel – Puma

This original Naval Assault Dirk is extremely rare and only the second or third example I've ever had the privilege to offer over the years. These remarkable daggers were considered for adoption by the Puma company in their 1939-40 catalog and they were described as “Model #8”. The Puma firm made a few of these daggers but apparently sales were slow and with the war breaking out the apparently decided to discontinue the piece. As a result there are probably no more than a dozen or so of these daggers in existence. This example has a Nazi pommel on the top in the 1938 changeover pattern. Apparently the original owner of this dagger did not like the original ball top and replaced it with the standard example that all of his fellow officers were wearing.

The hilt of this dirk is essentially the same as I show in my Navy Book on page 362. The scabbard bands are identical to the examples I show on page 361.

If you are not familiar with the 1938 changeover pommels you can see two examples on page 230 of my Navy book which are identical to this example. This example also exactly matches the gilded finish and level of wear of all of the remaining pieces of the dirk. This outstanding pommel in in the form of an eagle who looks to the left, with full detailing to the bird's eye, beak, neck, talons, recessed wings and wreath area. The swastika is in the center of the wreath, nicely rendered in relief. The majority of the original gilding is intact on this pommel, being at least 90 to 95% intact.

The unique crossguard on this crossguard is identical to the example I show on page 362 of my book. It features an obverse center block with a one-of-a-kind eagle with half-open wings that have a squared off look to them. The bird clutches a mobile swastika. On the opposite side of the guard the center block has the traditional fouled anchor which is randomly pebbled in the background.

The blade release button is the style which has been drilled, rather than the notched type. The button works well and is complete.

The quillon arms are quite special as they are large at the center and taper to teardrop ends. These arms are further decorated with a floral pattern which is bordered throughout the design. The original fire gilding is still present in the backgrounds of the floral designs, giving a muted contrast to the brighter gilding on the surfaces of the rest of the hilt. Overall a really beautiful design here.

I took a look inside of the of the hilt and, of course, the pommel is not numbered as we believe it would have been added by the original wearer at a later date. The lower portion of the guard as well as the butt plate are stamped “20” with the very small numbers used by the Puma firm. The blade tang is also stamped with the same small “20”.

The grip of this dirk is also in perfect condition. It is constructed with a carved wooden base with a celluloid covering. The celluloid has toned to a nice ivory color, and is tightly wrapped with twisted brass wire. It is interesting to not that these Puma grips the tang clearance hole at the top is square rather than round, a good tip for those of you out there if you're even looking at a Puma Assault Dirk.

The scabbard is a real beauty, have a deep, hammered finish. The scabbard is in full Mint condition, having nearly 100% of the original gilded surfaces. It is further enhanced by the unique bands that are sometimes used on these Assault Dirks; we also sometimes see them with roped knot type bands. These special bands are the same as those shown in my Navy Book on page 361. They resemble Army style carrying bands, having overlapping oak leaves with acorns. The gilding is also all there on these bands. The carrying rings are plain and also have some of the original gilded finish remaining. The throat is held in place by two flat head side screws which appear to be steel with an old gilded finish.

The Puma Assault Dirks I have dealt with in the past have always had plain blades, and the same is true here. The blade is still bright and shows only the most minor traces of age. It is fashioned with double fullers and a ricasso. The tip is still needle-like.

The reverse ricasso is stamped with the familiar diamond shaped logo of the Puma firm, complete with the usual cat head. The location city, “Solingen”, can be seen below the diamond. The original reddish felt washer is in place.

This is an opportunity rarely offered for those out there that are assembling an advanced Naval collection. Original Naval Assault Dirks rarely come up for sale and as such are the very definition of a good investment. This piece has all of the condition you could want coupled with the fact that it is 100% original. This is your chance to acquire a dagger that almost no one else has!

Near Mint. $17,995.50

NVL12 #37674C 2nd Model Naval Dagger with Elfenbein Grip & Damascus Blade

This beautiful 2nd Model Naval dagger is equipped with Eickhorn mounts. These mounts are textbook throughout and were most likely purchased by the producer of the blade, Paul Dinger, in order to show off this fine treasure.

The pommel is a beauty, having the typical Eickhorn look and appearing to have 100% of the original gilding. The details to the bird are excellent throughout the head, beak, breast feathering, half-opened wings, talons, wreath and brighter mobile swastika within.

The crossguard is also a fine matching example, featuring fouled anchors in the two center blocks. The quillon arms have raised acanthus leaves which are nicely detailed, and end in enhanced buttons with nipples in the center.

The grip is an outstanding genuine Elfenbein. It is very beautiful, with subtle grain running throughout the surfaces of both sides. The grip has toned to a beautiful color and is in totally perfect condition. This stunning grip is tightly wrapped with twisted brass wire.

Accenting the hilt is what appears to be the original-to-the-piece silver bullion portepee. The bullion has toned to a fine golden color and remains in completely perfect condition, still in the reef knot tie. The slide and stem have the characteristic “V” weave and the lower silver bullion ball has a “cat's anus” insert.

The scabbard is in completely perfect condition, also having 100% of the original gilded surface. It is stamped with a pattern of palmettes over and under the two carrying bands, and the lower portion is decorated with lightning bolts, ermine feet, and finely detailed acanthus leaves. The eyes have crisp triple serrated surfaces, and the rings still have traces of gilding on them, an indication that this dagger was seldom worn. Overall a very fine scabbard here.

The best thing about the dagger, though, is the hand forged Damascus blade. This blade is in the Small Roses pattern, which was extremely difficult to make as well as being extremely expensive. It is very rare to see the Small Roses pattern. When it does show up it is mostly on Imperial era sword blades. This blade is in perfect condition with outstanding details throughout the rare and intricate pattern. It has dual fuller construction and, at the reverse, has a built0in locking mechanism. I took a look at the tang of this blade and it has the stampings “P+D” as well as the remaining letters “ECH” and “DAM”. The “Echter Damaszener” stampings were made prior to the fitting as well as the cutting of the channel for the blade lock, so only these letters remain. These stampings were mostly used to identify blades as being Damascus and many times all of the stampings were obliterated during the fitting process. The original brown leather washer is in place on this dagger.

I would think that this dagger was probably produced by Dinger as a private order. These Damascus smiths worked for themselves as well as subcontracting for Solingen blade companies. A dagger like this represents one of the finest and highest quality examples that was made during the period. If you appreciate the beautiful workmanship of these Third Reich Damascus smiths coupled with the fine condition and looks of Eickhorn mounts, this is a dagger that you will enjoy for many, many years.

Mint. $16,195.50

NVL12 #38329C 2nd Model Naval Dagger with Distributor Marked Blade – Carl Eickhorn

This 2nd Model Naval Dagger was probably purchased by a high ranking officer early in the period as the pommel is a 1938 changeover type. This pommel is a real looker, being identical to the example I show on page 229 of my Navy Book. It has very deeply inset wings and an impressive vault wreath. The details to this bird are also choice, with a striking eye, beak and breast.

The crossguard is a standard Eickhorn type, the same as that shown on page 266 of my book.

The grip, unfortunately, has some cracking. These cracks are rather serious, running from the top rib down to the fourth rib and also running around the grip on the reverse. The good news is that the grip wire is extremely tight; everything is held firmly in place with little chance of pieces breaking off. The brass wire is in excellent condition and has trapped a lot of reside around it, imparting a fine look.

This damage has always been an issue with Naval grips. We have the same issue with Shooting Cutlasses; the collecting community has accepted that this type of flaw is almost a given. The problem here, of course, is the fact that the base of the grip is of carved wood. The celluloid was dipped over this base, which is all well and good provided the wood doesn't shrink. Unfortunately time takes its toll and once the inevitable shrinkage begins the celluloid coating is unsupported and as fragile as an egg shell. I make it a policy not to ship Naval daggers in the cold winter months as often they go out to the customer in perfect condition, but after a time in a sub-zero warehouse or cargo hold end up becoming cracked.

Wrapped about the hilt is the original-to-the-piece silver bullion portepee. This portepee is a beauty, tied in a double reef knot. There is a tiny bit of flaw where the cord exits the knot but it isn't bad. The slide and stem have the usual braided “V design and the bullion ball is constructed of silver yarn-like material. The insert has the “cat's anus” style stuffing.

The lightning bolt scabbard is straight and shows a little hand wear, but that is to be expected as this dagger was worn throughout the period. The scabbard is stamped with well-defined palmettes around the bands and lightning bolts, ermine feet and acanthus leaves down to the chape. The bands feature overlapping oak leaves and acorns. The rings are the triple serrated type and also show some wear. The throat is retained by two dome head screws.

The blade is an extremely nice example, with a high quality nickel-plated finish and an excellent fouled anchor etch. The etch is beautiful, retaining 100% of the frosted backgrounds. The reverse ricasso is stamped with the 1935-41 Eickhorn Squirrel trademark, and the original tan felt blade buffer is in place.

It is interesting to note that the blade edge at the ricasso is the marking a famous retailer located in Kiel; it reads, “Aug. Lüneberg Kiel”. I have seen this marking on many, many Imperial blades but this is the first time I've encountered it on a Third Reich piece. This lets me know for sure that August Lüneberg was still in business during the Third Reich. It is strange that this is the first time I should see it, given that they had quite a large operation in a busy location. Perhaps Lüneberg didn't bother having the etchings done later in the period and this marking is a carry over from the Imperial days. Either way it makes for a most interesting dagger. I'm fairly sure that you will not see a blade of this vintage marked this way again!

Excellent. $1,195.00

NVL12 #38199 1872 Naval Applicanten Bayonet – Carl Eickhorn

The Applicanten Bayonet was issued to apprentices of NCO rank who were in training for administrative and technical assignments. This piece is iron with a plating a brass, indicating that it was most likely produced during the WW1, the design being dictated by shortages in material. The brass plating has a fine patina and looks to be intact across the hilt.

This example, within the scabbard, measures just about 19 inches in length. The hilt is basically a one piece unit. The grip and pommel curve slightly off to the left, with the pommel being rounded at the top with a round nut that acts to retain the tang. The grip has ribs cut into it to afford a handhold.

The crossguard has a center block which features a raised Imperial crown. The crown is very nicely detailed. The guard arms are almost in the shape of bowling pins and have rounded ends. Below the guard is a separate clamshell piece equipped with a spring-loaded hinge. This clamshell is decorated with a raised out fouled anchor design.

The scabbard shell is a fine leather example, being decorated with a pair of lines that run the length of the edges. It is sewn up the rear. The leather shows very little evidence of age and is in first-rate condition. The scabbard mounts are steel based with brass plating. They have a fine patina on the obverse that exactly matches the hilt. The reverse has some wear to the brass finish and small amounts of the steel base are peeking through. These mounts have scalloped edges and are retained by staples. There are numbers beneath the staples. The upper mount is fitted with a long, slender lug meant to retain a carrying frog.

This piece completely surprises the viewer when it is drawn from the scabbard. The 13 inch blade is in fully mint condition, somehow having survived the eleven decades without incident. This blade is a slab-sided affair with a ricasso, completely mirror-bright and beautifully nickel-plated. The blade is triple etched; the obverse depicts an Imperial crown set above a fouled anchor with a fully-rigged three masted ship below, cutting across a body of water with ensigns flying. The end of the blade has fine etchings of cannons, drums and standartes. The reverse etching is very similar except the ship is shown form a slightly different angle and the cannon are accompanied by a trident in addition to the standartes. The spine is etched with a pattern of fine laurel leaves. I can't express how great this blade is; it is really something to see a piece this old in this kind of miraculous condition.

The reverse ricasso is stamped with an Eickhorn trademark. This mark is in the form of two squirrels sitting back to back above the initials “C.E.”. This trademark was not used after 1918. The original red felt blade buffer is in place, showing some age but still intact.

A very fine example of an untouched Model 1872 Applicanten. These pieces are not easy to come by; this piece was recently purchased by me directly from a veteran family.

Excellent Plus. $1,895.00

NVL12 #38062 2nd Model Naval Dagger - Adolf Braun (Alcoso)

This is a fine quality Naval example having good brass mounts. The pommel is the 1938 change-over type, being the same as I show in my Naval Book on Page 232. This pommel has outstanding detail throughout the bird and the half-open wings are deeply recessed at the bird's body. The wreath and swastika are nicely vaulted outward. The crossguard has the fouled anchor in both of the center blocks with excellent detail to the acanthus leaves. The button ends are excellent with protruding nipples at the tips.

The wood-based grip is carved and coated with celluloid. The celluloid has turned a pleasing off-white color. This grip is in perfect condition with the exception of two minuscule cracks at the reverse bottom rib; it is very hard to even see these and they are nothing.

The lightning bolt scabbard is the typical Alcoso type. It is straight throughout, being the lightning bolt pattern. The lower scabbard button-end is completely flat on the bottom and appears to have been made this way. The bands show some modest wear on the oak leaves, but not bad. The eyelets are the typical Alcoso type, having the sleeve at both of the carrying ring openings. The throat is retained by two brass dome head side screws.

As we normally see on these Braun-marked daggers, the blade is a plain example; apparently the Navy ordered these dirks from Braun for NCO's. The blade is in mint condition, with fine nickel-plated surfaces and double-fuller construction. The reverse ricasso is stamped horizontally, "Adolf Braun/ Berlin". The off-red felt blade buffer is in place.

A good, solid example of a rarely-seen Naval type.

Excellent. $875.00

NVL12 #38191C 2nd Model Naval Dagger – Carl Eickhorn

This 2nd Model Naval Dagger by Carl Eickhorn is an early piece that was originally produced as a 1st Model with the ball top pommel. The ball top was replaced in 1938 with the changeover pattern.

The pommel is a real beauty, with deep recesses within the wings of the eagle and outstanding detailing throughout. This bird is extremely crisp throughout, with a highly vaulted wreath and much detail to the mobile swastika. This pommel is the same as the examples I show on page 229 of my Navy Book.

The crossguard is a early Eickhorn design, slightly thinner than the later types. It has fouled anchors on both of the center blocks and good acanthus leaves decorating the guard arms. The quillon ends finish with fine nippled buttons.

The grip of this dagger is of carved wood coated with off-white celluloid. There is a small crack at the center segment but there is no material missing. This grip is wrapped with twisted brass wire which shows years of usage and residue between the ribs.

The original portepee is also in place and has been on this dagger since the get-go. The portepee is an aluminum type tied in a Naval tie; it has no fraying or problems whatsoever. The stem, slide and lower ball are in excellent shape, and the stuffing is a flat material style.

The scabbard is the hammered type with no dents or problems. The carrying bands are the style decorated with a pattern of overlapping oak leaves. They do show some mild wear to the surfaces of both sides. This dagger was probably carried for many years. The eyelets are triple serrated and also have small sleeves in the holes that retain the rings. Eickhorn used these sleeves early on but discontinued this design element in the 30's. The throat is retained by a pair of dome head brass screws.

The blade of this dagger is a fine double edged example. It is still bright but does have a couple of age spots, but nothing that really detracts from the look. The frosted backgrounds are still all there, giving a good look to the raised fouled anchor etching. The tip is remains needle-like.

The reverse ricasso is deeply stamped with the early 1933 through 1935 Eickhorn trademark; two ovals which contain the firm's name and location, “Carl Eickhorn Solingen”. Inside we see a seated squirrel with a serrated tail. Naval daggers bearing this early trademark are very difficult to come by. The original brown felt blade buffer is in place, although it shows wear to the edges.

An interesting dagger here, one which has surely seen an awful lot of German history and come through it all in very nice condition.

Excellent. $1,795.00

NVL12 #38136C Imperial Naval Dirk – Carl Eickhorn

This Naval Dirk is a Model 1902 and is in spectacular condition. This dirk is identical to the example I show in my Navy Book on page 132. This piece was apparently made during wartime as the mounts are the iron type. They have been heavily gilded and none of the base metal is showing. This is very rare to see and extremely desirable.

The pommel is the style with very high finials. These finials are beautifully serrated and rise up to support a royal orb and simulated cross. The crown has eight domed sections around the circumference, each alternating between images of crosses and Prussian eagles. Each section is surrounded by fine pebbling.

The crossguard is also a real beauty, with fouled anchor center blocks on both sides. Each anchor is nicely raised out against a background of random pebbling. The four-sided guards flare outward into capstan ends. The upper portion of the crossguard has a built-in neck which accepts the grip.

The grip is of extremely fine Elfenbein in totally perfect condition. Both sides of the grip have taken on a golden tone and have very visible graining. The grip is tightly wrapped with thick brass wire. This wrap has strapped a century of residue around the rib areas; I like to see this as it really speaks to the age and history of the dirk. This grip is simply spectacular, and in a condition that you almost never see.

The hammered scabbard is also exceptional, completely dent-free and retaining 100% of the original gilded finish. The bands are some of the best you will see, being identical to those pictured on page 132 of my book. They have been decorated with a pattern of overlapping oak leaves and acorns. The detailing throughout is amazing. The eyelets and carrying rings have been hammered to match. The throat is retained by two dome head brass screws.

The blade of this dirk is a Sailing Ship type. Eickhorn sis not make this type of blade during the Nazi period so it is quite a pleasure to see one. The blade is still bright throughout and retains good frosted backgrounds. The obverse area just past the ricasso depicts a fully rigged three masted sailing ship, ensigns fluttering and floating on a bed of sea plants. The etching beyond this is very unusual for a Naval dirk, as it depicts a cannon and standartes surrounded by floral designs. The reverse facing has another sailing ship, this time finishing with a drum, cannon and standartes. This blade is in nearly mint condition, with just a couple of extremely minor nicks on both edges. The reverse ricasso has the imperial ear Eickhorn logo consisting of two squirrels sitting back to back. The animals sit above the initials of the firm, “C.E.” The remnants of the original red felt blade buffer are still present around the blade shoulders. Most of the buffer has gone to time but there is enough there to see what it looked like originally.

This is a fine opportunity to acquire a very fine dirk. Most of the Imperial pieces we see were made by WKC, who was by far the largest producer at the time; a nice Eickhorn example is a very rare sight indeed.

Near Mint. $2,995.00

#38036 Early 2nd Model Naval Dagger with Orange Grip and Hammered Scabbard – WKC

This choice WKC 2nd Model Naval Dagger has much appeal. The early mounts are in fine condition, being in the classic WKC style. There is about 50 to 60% of the original gilding intact on these hilt mounts.

The pommel has fine detail throughout the bird's head, breast checkering, wings, talons and wreathed swastika. The crossguard is also outstanding, with excellent acanthus leaves decorating both quillon arms and the ends having good buttons with good, failry crisp nipples.

The deep orange grip is in perfect condition. This grip is extremely striking, and is tightly wrapped with twisted brass wire.

There is a fine silver portepee on this dagger, set in the the original double-reef Naval tie. This portepee shows age but is totally free of fraying. The stem and slide are decorated with “V” pattern woven bullion, and the bullion lower ball has the “cat's anus” style stuffing.

The scabbard shell is incredible with an outstanding hammered finish. The hammering extends directly down to the chape button. This scabbard is completely straight and has never had any dents. The carrying bands are high off the surface, and feature a pattern of overlapping oak leaves and acorns. The eyelets have a triple serrated finish that shows only the most mild traces of usage. The throat is retained by two untouched brass screws.

The double etched blade is as nice as you will see. It has a perfect nickel-plated surface which is still mirror-bright and retains a needle-like tip. The fouled anchor etch is beautifully accentuated by the 100% intact frosted backgrounds. This blade is easily in full mint condition. The obverse ricasso is stamped with the Knight Head trademark of the WKC firm, and the original reddish felt blade buffer is in place.

If you are looking an orange gripped, hammered scabbard Naval piece this is one you will be sure to keep for a lifetime.

Near Mint. $2,295.00

NVL12 #38035C Model 1929 Naval Dirk – WKC

This Model 1929 Naval Dirk began its life with the round ball top. In 1938 Naval daggers with this ball top were subject of a changeover to the new pattern pommel. These special pommels were produced and shipped out Naval personnel to facilitate this upgrade.

This pommel is a real beauty, being the same as the example I shown on page 229 of my Navy Book. It has taken on a fine, antique brass look that matches the patina seen on the rest of the dagger. The pommel has the deeply inset half-opened wings with a highly vaulted wreath and a raised swastika. The details throughout the bird are exceptional; these changeover pommels are easily recognizable from the standard types made after this point.

The crossguard is the thin, early type that we seen on WKC pieces. This guard is fitted out with a push button blade release which is the “drilled” type, as opposed to the notch style used later on. This guard is in excellent condition, with fine raised acanthus leaves on both quillon arms as well as good button ends with nipples.

The grip of this dirk remains in perfect condition. It is an off-white celluloid over a wooden base. It is tightly wrapped with twisted brass wire with years of reside visible in the recesses, a testament to the long life of this dirk.

The original silver portepee accompanies this dirk. This portepee is the style with the larger cord. Don't ask me how these things were ever tied; if you've attempted to do it yourself you know the frustration. The narrow cord examples are hard enough, these thicker types will drive you to drink! This bullion knot shows some mild fraying at the top loop as well as where the reef knot is tied on the obverse. It is, however, in good condition overall. The slide is a bit worn but it matches the stem, being in the “V” pattern weave. The lower ball is of bullion with the typical “cat's anus” stuffing.

The scabbard is the early style with lightning bolt stampings and knotted rope bands. These stampings show good detail to the palmettes above and below the bands, as well as to the lightning bolts, ermine feet and pointed acanthus leaves. This scabbard is dent free. The roped, figure 8 bands have the simulated knot on the front only, the reverse having standard simulated double ropes. The eyelets are also simulated rope and show only modest wear. The throat is retained by a pair of dome head screws.

The blade of this dirk is the early sailing ship type. Other than just a little bit of age that appears on both sides of the ricasso the blade is in nearly mint condition. It has outstanding bright nickel plating and a needle-like tip. The sailing ship etch is in outstanding condition with the original frosted backgrounds intact and highlighting the finely raised etch. There is a fouled anchor design on the obverse blade, positioned above a finely detailed, fully rigged sailing ship. On the reverse the anchor is eliminated and an additional sailing ship, fully rigged as well, is added. The original leather blade washer is in place.

A very fine, historic piece here, recently received from a veteran family. The changeover pommel makes adds a great deal of interest and desirability to this already fine piece.

Excellent Plus, Plus. $1,595.00

NVL12 #37826 2nd Model Naval Dagger with Orange Grip & Hammered Scabbard – WKC

This 2nd Model Naval Dagger was produced in the mid-930's, prior to the 1938 changeover pommel. The pommel on this example is the changeover type; it is the same as the example I show on page 229 of my Navy Book.

The pommel has outstanding detail, with the deeply recessed wings typical of the type. The bird's head, breast feathering, talons, wreath and swastika are in outstanding condition. This pommel exactly matches the finish of the crossguard.

The crossguard is the standard WKC type, the same as that shown on page 270 of my book. It is interesting to not that this guard does not have the release button commonly seen on other daggers of this type. The release was actually an option, and the original owner of this dagger must have opted against the extra cost. The release lock has been tapered so the dagger can be easily withdrawn from the scabbard, and easily rests in place when put back in.

The grip is a real beauty, being a very deep orange. Unfortunately it has a small crack that runs down the first segment. This crack is partially hidden by the in-place portepee. The rest of the grip is perfect, however, and is tightly wrapped with twisted brass wire.

The original-to-the-piece portepee is the aluminum type and is the style with wide cords. There is a bit of fraying on the top loop as well as to the area of the portepee where it exits the original tie. Overall, though, it is still in good condition.

The hammered scabbard is just outstanding. It retains about 90% of the original gilded finish and is in perfect condition, as straight as an arrow. This scabbard has the high off the surface overlapping carrying bands. These bands feature a pattern of overlapping oak leaves and acorns. The eyelets have engraved oak leaves, a trait seen on many examples from WKC. The throat is retained by two flat head brass side screws.

The double etched blade of this dagger features the desirable sailing ship design. It shows just the most modest traces of age in a couple of places, but overall is still nearly mint with a good, needle-like tip.

The obverse blade features a fouled anchor positioned over a fully-rigged sailing ship, which comes at the viewer across a bed of sea plants. The reverse etch eliminates the anchor and substitutes an even large ship, again afloat on a bed of sea plants. The obverse ricasso is deeply stamped with the WKC Knight Head trademark, set above the firm's initials, “WKC”. The original brown leather blade washer is in place.

Were it not for the crack in the grip a dagger of this caliber would sell for at least $500 to $600 more than my asking price; if you can live with the minor flaw this dagger is a real bargain. A real looker here!

Excellent Plus, Plus. $1,695.00

NVL12 #37824 2nd Model Naval Dagger – Carl Eickhorn

This Eickhorn 2nd Model Naval Dagger is a textbook example with a highest quality hilt and scabbard. The hilt mounts are identical to those shown in my Navy Book on page 263 and 266.

The pommel shows little wear and has fine detailing throughout. The crossguard has fouled anchor center blocks with good acanthus leaves on the quillon arms. The button ends are accented and have crisp center nipples.

The off-white celluloid over wood grip is in perfect condition throughout. It is tightly wrapped with twisted brass wire. The wire has trapped a lot of residue in the recesses, giving a good look to the piece.

The original-to-the-piece aluminum portepee is still in place. This portepee shows wear to the top loop as well as to the cord where it exits the tie. Nothing serious, however, and it add a bit of character. The lower ball has a “cat's anus” style stuffing.

The lightning bolt scabbard is also in fine condition. There are no dents and the obverse retains about 98% of the original gilding. The reverse shows some wear to the gilding between the carrying bands as well as a small amount to the lower portion of the scabbard. The gilding here is about 70% intact. The carrying bands are decorated with outstanding overlapping oak leaves and acorns. The eyelets have the typical triple serrations that show only modest wear. The lower area of the scabbard, with its ermine feet, acanthus leaves and lightning bolts, is identical to the example I show on page 266 of my Navy Book.

The double etched blade of this dagger is in extremely choice, mint condition. It is completely mirror-bright with a fine, needle-like tip and retains 100% of the frosting behind the etch. The fouled anchor motif really jumps off the blade and is among the best you will ever see. The reverse ricasso of the blade is stamped with the “Over the Shoulder” Eickhorn Squirrel trademark first used in 1941, and the original brown felt blade buffer is in place.

A very fine Eickhorn Naval Dagger here.

Near Mint. $1,495.00

NVL12 #37582C 2nd Model Naval Dagger with Orange Grip & Hammered Scabbard – WKC

This Naval Dagger, with its orange grip and hammered scabbard, is the type that many collectors want to add to their collections a 2nd Model Naval example. It is a textbook WKC, virtually identical to the example I show on page 366 of my Navy Book.

The pommel is a fine WKC example, having excellent detailing to the bird's head and breast feathering, as well as to the half-opened wings, talons, and wreathed mobile swastika.

The crossguard is in excellent condition, with good fouled anchors on the center blocks of both sides. The quillon arms have nicely detailed acanthus leaves, with button ends that have nipples in the center.

The grip of this dagger is a very dark orange color, even throughout. There is a small crack in the third rib from the top, but it is not threatening and if anything adds character to the grip. These orange grips are of solid celluloid so there is no danger of the flaw worsening on its own. This grip is otherwise in nearly perfect condition.

There is a silver bullion portepee accompanying this dagger, in a naval reef tie. This accoutrement is set in place and has no fraying.

The scabbard shell is straight throughout, with an excellent hammered finish. The gilding is about 80% intact, being the same state as that seen on the hilt mounts. The bands are excellent, high off the surface types. They show little to no wear. The eyelets are the triple serrated types; sometimes we see eyelets with engraved oak leaves on WKC daggers, but we also see them in this fashion. The throat is retained by two dome head side screws.

The double etched blade is a real beauty and is as nice as they come. It has a quality nickel-plated finish, mirror-bright and retaining a needle-like tip. 100% of the frosting is in place behind the etched, providing a stimulating feast for the eye. The etch on this blade is the standard fouled anchor type as we seen on most WKC pieces made after 1938. When we see a sailing ship motif, it indicates a blade made prior to 1938. This Mint blade is stamped with the Knight Head trademark of the WKC firm, and the original blade buffer is in place showing only minor age to the edges.

A very nice, desirable 2nd Model Naval Dagger here.

Near Mint. $2,495.00

NVL12 #35550C Wiemar Transitional Naval Dagger with Damascus Blade – WKC

This interesting Transitional Naval Dagger appears to me as though it was originally worn during the 1920's. It is possible the owner remained in the Navy through the Third Reich period, and had the dagger updated to reflect the times. It appears that the scabbard and pommel are both of Third Reich WKC vintage, while the crossguard, grip and blade are most likely from an earlier period. In the German Navy, this upgrading of dirks to reflect the times was quite a commonplace occurrence.

The pommel appears to be the same as the WKC example I shown on page 269 of my Navy Book. It also has a slightly newer look than the crossguard, usually being an indication of a changeover. This pommel has excellent detail to the bird's head, breast feathering, half-open wings, talons, and wreath with swastika. There is also about 80% of the original gilding finish remaining. The crossguard appears to have more wear, and appears to be from the 1920's period. This guard depicts fouled anchors on both center blocks, and has acanthus leaves which decorate the outgoing crossguard arms. The ends have the the traditional lined buttons with nipples in the center.

The grip of this example is a real beauty. it has some pleasing grain running throughout, and some attractive golden tones. This grip is the type that has twin sets of grip wire that we sometimes see, particularly on Imperial era grips. I do not think, however, that this is a vintage Imperial grip, because the blade has a marking that I normally associate with a period after World War I. If you are not familiar with grips with dual wire, you can see one on page 57 (center) of was. There are no cracks or flaws on this fine ivory grip.

The hilt is decorated with what appears to be the original silver bullion knot. This portepee has long ago turned a dark gold color. It is tied in the traditional double reef knot, and although it shows age, there is no fraying to be seen. The slide and stem have the “V” designs, and they have also turned dark. The lower ball is the silver bullion type, matching the darkness of the strap, slide, and stem. The insert is a smooth fabric, having a lined texture. A very fine hilt here.

The scabbard is a traditional Third Reich period WKC example. It has the lightning bolt motif, and still has about 90% of the original gilding on the finish. The stamping of the designs is crisp and deep, featuring palmettes on the bands, with lightning bolts, ermine feet and acanthus leaves visible on the lower portion. The bands are the “high-off-the-surface” style, featuring overlapping oak leaves shot through with acorns. The eyelets are the triple-serrated type, showing some modest wear to the surfaces. The throat is retained by two dome-head screws.

The blade is a fine Damascus pattern that is the standard “Maiden Hair” motif. This blade shows some minor age, but there is no pitting or blemishes. The tip is still needle-like. The obverse ricasso is stamped with the knight head trademark, and beneath are the initials of the firm, “WKC”. As stated above, I feel that this Damascus blade probably comes from the 1920's.

The lock on this blade is rather interesting. There is no release button on the reverse crossguard. The blade was retained by the locking mechanism, but it was necessary for the owner to give a tug in order to pull the blade out. The lock mechanism has been slightly slanted at the catch area to make the removal of the blade relatively easy. This lack of a release button is an anomaly that was done in the 1920's to save money. The catalogs from this period actually show a release button as an option! To illustrate this point, I show a copy of the Carl Eickhorn catalog from November 1933 on page 204 of my Naval Book. In this catalog it illustrates the Blade Release Button as an optional item. The blade is protected by an off-red felt buffer.

This is a nifty transitional dagger, and a fun example to have in a collection, as it clearly illustrates how older Naval Dirks were modified for wear during the Third Reich period. A fine, rarely seen Naval Dirk here.

Excellent. $5,495.00

NVL12 #37465 2nd Model Naval Dirk – Carl Eickhorn

This 2nd Model Naval Dirk is a classic Eickhorn piece and is in choice condition, showing very little usage.

The dagger has the textbook Eickhorn pommel and crossguard, the same as though shown on pages 263 and 266 of my Navy Book. The pommel still has quite a bit of the original gilding across the surfaces, being maybe 85% intact. It has fine detail to the bird's head, breast feathering, wreath and vaulted swastika.

The crossguard is also a fine example, having a matching gilded surface. It features a fouled anchor in the center block of both facings, and acanthus leaves on the quillon arms. The quillons end in nippled buttons.

The grip is a fine example, being of carved wood covered with celluloid. The white celluloid is in excellent condition, with no cracks or problems. It has a nice tone from age, and is tightly wrapped with twisted brass wire. Lots of age can be seen trapped by this wire between the ribs.

The original silver bullion portepee is still on this dagger, being in the Naval tie. The silver bullion has long since toned to a golden color. There is some wear to the knot at the upper loop area as well as to the cord where it emerges from the Naval tie. Overall though this knot is still something we like to see as it imparts a real sense of history to the dirk. The lower portion of the knot has a “V” weave of bullion to the slide and stem, while the bullion lower ball has a “cat's anus” style stuffing.

The scabbard is the typical lightning bolt variety, being the same as I show on page 266 of my Navy Book. It is dent-free and has good, deep stamping to the pattern. It features palmettes over and under the bands, with lightning bolts at the bottom followed by ermine feet and acanthus leaves. The bands are well defined, showing little wear and featuring overlapping oak leaves. The eyelets are the triple serrated style and show little wear. There are still signs of gilding on the hanging rings, which is also a good indication that this dirk saw little use. The scabbard has almost 100% of the gilding on the obverse, while the reverse shows some wear to the center area between the two bands as well as a small amount toward the acanthus leaves. This is all attributable to the actual wearing time of this dirk. The throat is retained by two dome head brass screws.

The blade is a beauty, being a double-etched nautical type. It has pristine, high quality nickel-plated surfaces, with 100% of the gray backgrounds which highlight the etch on both sides. This blade is easily in full Mint condition. The reverse ricasso is stamped with the familiar 1935-41 Eickhorn seated squirrel logo. The brown felt blade buffer is in place and shows little age.

This is a first-rate Naval Dirk, showing little in the way of usage and still retaining great condition with good investment potential.

Near Mint. $1,495.00

NVL12 #37362 2nd Model Naval Dagger – WKC

This 2nd Model Naval Dagger has textbook WKC mounts throughout, the same as those I show in my Navy Book on page 270. The scabbard is identical to the example shown on page 271 of my book.

The WKC pommel is quite good looking, with fine detail to the bird's head, feathering, wreath and vaulted swastika. There is not a lot of gilding left on this dagger, perhaps 35 to 40%, but the amount that there is imparts a period look as well as preserving a nice, collectible condition.

The crossguard features the fouled anchor motif on both sides, and the quillon arms are decorated with a design of acanthus leaves. The crossguards end in buttons with nipple tips.

The grip is a carved wood base with a good celluloid covering. This celluloid has toned from age and remains in perfect condition, and is tightly wrapped with twisted brass wire.

The scabbard is completely straight throughout. It has the usual lightning bolt pattern and is deeply stamped with palmettes above and below the bands, while the lower portion features lightning bolts, ermine feet and acanthus leaves. The bands feature overlapping oak leaves and show almost no wear. The eyelets are the triple serrated type and are still mostly crisp. The throat is retained by two brass dome head screws.

The blade is a very fine example, having a double-etched nautical motif. This blade has a needle-like tip and the high quality nickel-plated surface is bright and easily in Mint condition. This is a beautiful naval blade. The obverse ricasso is stamped with the familiar knight head logo of WKC, as well as the firm's initials. The reddish blade buffer is in place.

A fine Naval Dagger here, showing some period wear and having a great etched blade.

Excellent Plus, Plus. $1,395.00

NVL12 #37481 2nd Model Naval Dagger – Carl Eickhorn

This Carl Eickhorn Naval Dagger is a fine, textbook example. The dagger itself is very nice as is the blade.

The pommel and crossguard are the same as those I show in my Navy Book pages 263 and 266. The pommel has excellent detail throughout, with maybe 50 to 60% of the original gilded surface remaining. The eagle retained excellent detail to his head, breast and wing feathering, talons wreath and vaulted swastika.

The crossguard has about the same about of gilding and features the usual fouled anchor design fore and aft. The quillon are decorated with acanthus leaves and end in nippled buttons.

The grip is of carved wood covered in celluloid. This celluloid has acquired a pleasing age tone and remains in perfect condition. The twisted brass grip wire is nice and tight and does a good job setting off the grip.

The scabbard has some dings along the edges either made by someone hammering something or perhaps from rough wear by the original owner; perhaps he was running up and down the length of a U-boat! It is what it is, however, and this dagger is priced accordingly. It is the lightning bolt type. It has good stampings to the palmettes, lightning bolts, ermine feet and acanthus leaves. It also has about 70% of the original gilding on the obverse and perhaps about 50% still intact on the reverse. The carrying bands are beautiful, having a design of overlapping oak leaves, while the eyelets have good serrated surfaces. The throat is retained by two dome head side screws.

The blade is a very fine double-etched type with a needle-like tip. It features the fouled anchor motif and the nickel-plated surface is of highest quality, easily in Mint condition. The reverse ricasso is stamped with the post-1941 Eickhorn trademark with the “Over the Shoulder” squirrel. The original tan felt blade buffer is in place, showing some wear around the edges but nothing too bad.

A nice Eickhorn Naval Dagger here, priced to reflect to the scabbard dings.

Excellent. $1,095.00

NVL12 #37206 Imperial 1902 Naval Dirk with Damascus Blade - W. K. & C.

This Imperial piece is quite striking with its visual appearance almost speaking of its exciting century of German naval history. The overall length of the dirk is 16 1/2 inches, much shorter than the Cadet types of ten years before, and slightly longer than many of the '02 Models we see. The mounts of this dagger are all best quality brass. Although the brass would have had a luxurious gilded finish when new, the years have taken their toll here, with most of the plated finish has gone to time. It has, however, been replaced with a stirring patina spread evenly throughout the hilt and scabbard.

The pommel is the extra-cost, open finial type. The finial uprights have all been serrated and act to retain the royal orb with a cross at the top. The cross is the normally seen, squared-off variety, as years before, the effects of a sharp cross on the delicate fabrics of the wool uniform were learned through experience. The upper portion of the crown has had a diamond pattern cut in with dots punched into the center of each diamond. The pommel's outside has the eight dome-shaped panels. Each panel alternates centered crosses with Prussian eagles, with each panel having raised dots forming a surrounding border. The cross guard center block features a fouled anchor on each side, with random pebbling in the backgrounds. The reverse block is fitted with a blade release button. The two quillion arms are four-sided and end with capstans; a capstan is a vertical-axled mechanism used on ships to apply force to ropes, cables, and hawsers.

The grip is one of the best I had seen. Time has really done us a good turn here! This bone grip has turned a deep orange color on the obverse, having tantalizing grains running evenly through the deep color shades. The reverse grip has also turned slightly golden, but it is obvious that this dirk has rested "grip-up" in the light for decades to achieve the rich color of the obverse. On both of the edges, there are at least a half dozen surface line cracks that also give appealing life to this grip. The grip is tightly wrapped with a fairly thin twisted brass wire. I don't think you will see a more attractive hilt here; it is a real stunner!

The totally straight scabbard is also an extra-cost example, having hand-engraved single oak leaves on either side of the lower band and also on the bottom of the upper band. The lower portion of the scabbard shell features two sets of vertical oak leaf clusters separated by three acorns, each with checkered caps. Above the upper band is the simulation of a engraved bow. I have seen this "bow" many times on Imperial Naval dirks, but to date, I do not know the significance of it; perhaps it is meant to be a circle-tied rope? The carrying bands have straight bordered edges and in the center, are rows of raised oak leaves separated by two small acorns. There is a serrated design on all of the plain areas of the bands. The eyelets feature engraved oak leaves, a trait WKC continued through the 3rd Reich time on their naval hammered scabbards. The carrying rings are also oak leaf engraved. The scabbard throughout shows some mild wear, but all images are all still there. The throat is retained by two brass flat-head style screws.

The blade is a wonderful sight. It's really difficult to not get excited over a choice damascus blade, and this one is great. It is the traditional Naval style, having the normal double-fuller construction and retaining its needle-like tip. The blade measures just over 10 1/2 inches. The Damascus pattern is the "Maiden Hair" style. All details to the pattern weld are jumping out at the viewer. When I first purchased this dagger from a European collector, the blade patterns had slightly numbed over time. With a simple acid dip it has come back to its original splendor, just gorgeous and in full mint condition. The obverse ricasso is stamped with crossed swords and the initials of the supplier, "G.B. & S". I have seen this supplier's markings many times on fine Imperial blades, but to date, I have not learned their identity. The original purchaser would have ordered this dirk, with all of it special features, through this retail store. On the reverse ricasso is stamped the knight head logo of the well-known producer, W. K. & C. The blade is buffered by an off-red, felt washer.

If you are considering a Damascus Imperial Naval Dagger to highlight a collection, I can't imagine a better example. This dirk really has everything we enjoy in the edged weapon's hobby today - exciting history, excellrnt condition and head-turning looks. It is also a sound investment, as fine Imperial Naval dirks are becoming extremely difficult to acquire.

Excellent Plus, Plus. $5,995.00

NVL12 #37084 ¾ Size Wiemar Naval Dirk with Orange Grip – WKC

These ¾ sized WKC-made Naval Dirks are most beautiful and highly collectible. They are quite rare; this is only the second example I have had to offer in the last couple of years.

This elegant dirk measures, overall, 10¾ inches long. It is almost identical to the color picture I show in my Navy Book on page 171, with the exception of this example has a plain blade while the book piece is etched. We've always wondered if these pieces were made as desk pieces or were actually worn during formal occasions when a larger dirk would have been too cumbersome or obtrusive. They do balance perfectly when held by the upper ring, which is a good sign that they definitely could have been worn.

At any rate, this piece has nearly all of the original gilding throughout the brass surfaces. The round style ball pommel has all of the detailing to the reeds and and cattails, as well as the waves that run around the bottom collar.

The crossguard is the typical Imperial type. WKC never changed the guards or the scabbards on these pieces, as even the Third Reich examples will have Imperial guards. The guard features a fouled anchor design in a center panel on both sides. The detailing is extremely good, having a fine pebbled background. The four-sided arms stretch outward ending in quillons that are shaped to resemble a ships capstan; very elegant indeed!

The grip is the best you will see. It is a deep pumpkin orange color and is in perfect condition. This grip is tightly wrapped with twisted brass wire.

Accenting this dirk is a very interesting portepee, which is very short as it was made specifically for this smaller proportioned piece. The portepee is of silver bullion which has long since turned gold in color. It is so short that it allows for only loop around the bottom of the grip. There is no fraying or any problems with this portepee. The cord has flecks of black and red shot through the thread. The slide and stem and of silver bullion weave, and the small lower ball is of yarn-like silver bullion thread. The insert is in the cat's anus configuration, having red, white and black colors in the yarn. A really great portepee here, the first of which I have seen.

The scabbard has the standard lightning bolt motif commonly used on these Naval pieces. It has palmettes deeply stamped over and under the carrying bands, and, at the bottom, are upward arcing lightning bolts above a pattern of ermine feet and pointy acanthus leaves. The carrying bands are an attractive variety which feature a pattern of oak leaves and acorns in the center area, leaving the edges and border with a plain pattern which has been enhanced with lines. The throat has no visible retainage; I am not not if they were built into the scabbard or not.

The beautiful blade measures 6 inches in length. It is in stone mint condition with a 100% intact high quality nickel finish. The blade is the plain type with double fuller construction.

The reverse ricasso (or possibly obverse with WKC) feautures a knight head logo with no initials beneath it, putting it into the 1920's era. The mint blade is protected by an in-place red felt buffer.

If you are looking for a jewelry-like enhancement to show off with your Naval Daggers it would be hard to resist this beautiful piece.

Near Mint. $4,295.00

NVL12 #37149 2nd Model Naval Dagger – Carl Eickhorn

This 2nd Model Eickhorn Naval Dagger is extremely clean and about as nice as they come on a dagger that was actually worn.

The hilt mounts are the typical Eickhorn variety, being identical to the mounts I show on page 263, 266 and 267 of my Navy Book. The pommel has good detail to the head and breast feathering, half-opened wings, talons, wreath and recessed mobile swastika of the bird. There still appears to be quite a bit of gilding on this pommel.

The matching crossguard has a larger center block, a trait typical of Eickhorn. It features fouled anchors on both sides. The detail to the acanthus leaves that decorate both sides of the quillon arms is also crisp. The guard ends in the engraved buttons which have nipples on the center tips.

The grip is a carved wood base having an outstanding off-white celluloid covering. It is in totally perfect condition, sporting tightly twisted brass wire.

The scabbard is the standard lightning-bolt type, the same as shown on page 266 of my Navy Book. It has the palmette designs on either side of the bands, and ends with a spray of lightning bolts and ermine feet set atop detailed acanthus leaves. This straight scabbard has eyelets that have triple serrations; they show little to no wear. The throat is retained by two brass dome head screws.

The blade is as nice as you will see. It has a mirror bright nickel-plated finish. This blade is in mint condition and retains a needle-like tip. The etch backgrounds to the fouled anchor motif are still at 100%, allowing the viewer to easily see the fouled anchor patterns with their floral leaves as well as the anchor with its attendant coiled serpent below. I'll bet you guys never realized that there was an additional anchor on these pieces, did you!

The reverse ricasso is stamped with the 1935-41 Eickhorn trademark, depicting a squirrel which looks to the left and who holds a downward pointing sword. Above the rodent is the word “Original” and below is the name and location of the firm, “Eickhorn Solingen”. There is a leather washer on this piece which must have been a period replacement; Eickhorn normally used a brown felt buffer. No big deal, though, and this can be changed at the request of the next owner.

A very fine Naval Dagger here.

Near Mint. $1,495.00

NVL12 #37103 2nd Model Naval Dagger – Carl Eickhorn

This textbook example is identical to the pieces that I show in my Navy Book on pages 266, 267, and 293.

The pommel is the standard type, still having some gilding left in the recesses. It feautures good detail to the head and breast feathering, half-opened wings, talons, wreath and recessed mobile swastika of the bird.

The crossguard also has quite a bit of gilding remaining, and feautures fouled anchor designs in the center blocks of both facings. The quillon arms have good detail to their decoration of acanthus leaves, and the button ends are accented with center nipples.

The off-white grip is in perfect condition, being constructed out of carved wood with a celluloid covering. The grip is tightly wrapped with twisted brass wire.

The scabbard shows some usage but it is straight throughout. It also has gilding in the surfaces commensurate to that seen on the pommel and guard. It has a design of palmettes above and around the bands, while the lower portion is decorated with lightning-bolts, ermine feet and acanthus leaves. This scabbard is identical to the example show on 266 (lower) of my book. The carrying bands have full detail to their overlapping oak leaves and acorns, while the eyelets have the still crisp triple serrated edges. The throat is retained by two dome head side screws.

The blade of this dagger is a real beauty, still in mint condition and retaining a needle-like tip. It has a highest quality nickel-plated finish as well as 100% of the gray backgrounds that serve to highlight the fouled anchor etch; this etch really jumps with this much of a contrasting background!

The reverse ricasso is stamped with the trademark used by Eickhorn after 1941, which we call the “Over-the-Shoulder” variety. This trademark can been seen in the center picture on page 266 of my book. The single-line squirrel looks backward over his shoulder. Beneath the rodent are the three words “Original / Eickhorn / Solingen”. The original brown felt buffer is in place.

A very nice example here, showing some time in-wear but still exuding outstanding original condition.

Excellent Plus, Plus. $1,395.00

NVL12 #36697C 2nd Model Naval Dagger – F.W. Höller

This F.W. Höller example is in fine condition throughout, having a complete set of textbook Höller mounts.

The pommel and crossguard have quite a bit of the original gilding intact. These hilt mounts are slightly brighter than the scabbard; this would indicate a possible difference in the composition of either the brass or gilded finish. Interestingly the brass release button in the crossguard exactly matches the scabbard.

The pommel is identical to the example I show in my Navy Book on page 278. The bird has outstanding detail throughout the head, beak, breast and wing feathering, as well as the talons and wreathed mobile swastika. The wings of the Höller eagles are nicely turn outward.

The crossguard is also a textbook example. It has the fouled anchor center blocks on both sides, and the crossguard arms are decorated with raised acanthus leaves. The button ends of the guards have the long nipples typical of a Höller pedigree, identical to those shown on page 79 of my Navy Book.

The grip of this dagger is a nice, off-white color, and remains in perfect condition. This grip is wrapped with the springy style wire normally seen the Höller product.

The fine scabbard is as straight as an arrow. It is engraved with palmettes over and under the carrying bands, while the lower regions are richly decorated with designs of lightning bolts, ermine feet, and acanthus leaves. This Höller scabbard is the same as the example I show on page 279 of my Navy Book. The carrying bands are the style with straight edges, another design hallmark of the Höller firm. Both eyelets have a serrated finish, while the throat is retained by two flathead side screws.

The double-etched blade of this dagger is a beauty, with a high quality nickel finish and a needle-like tip. All of the frosting remains in the backgrounds behind the nautical scenes. Höller blades were only made in the sailing ship style. The obverse depicts a fouled anchor in the center, with a fully-rigged sailing ship tacking towards the viewer across a bed of sea plants. The revere blade has essentially the same vessel, although it has been moved upward slightly eliminating the fouled anchor design. The reverse ricasso is etched with a dual oval trademark. The oval contains the name and location of the firm, “F.W. Höller / Solingen”, and the classic thermometer logo, with too many digits to ever count... Although it's actually 17 one each side, for a total of 34. The original brown leather blade buffer is in place.

A very nice, textbook Höller Naval Dagger here.

Excellent Plus, Plus. $1,295.00

NVL12 #36494 2nd Model Naval Dagger – F.W. Höller

This Höller piece shows period use, but overall is in very fine, collectible condition. The dagger is a complete, textbook Höller, and is identical to the examples I show in my Navy Book on pages 278 and 279.

The pommel still has good detail to the head, breast and wing feathering, talons, wreath and mobile swastika. It has some old residue in the recesses, probably the remains of old polish used long ago. This polish is also in lower recessed throughout the crossguard and scabbard.

The crossguard is a classic example, featuring fouled anchors on the center mounts, and good acanthus leaves on the quillon arms. The button ends are nicely lined, with nipples that stick out fairly far.

The grip is an off white celluloid which is in nice condition throughout, and deeply toned. It does have a small hairliner between the third and fourth rib going upward, but just on the edge and it hardly shows. The grip is tightly wrapped with springy copper wire. The wire has nicely trapped lots of old dirt and residue, and speaks to the dagger's history.

The scabbard is straight throughout, being the lightning bolt type. This scabbard has good detail to the palmettes around the bands, and to the lower lightning bolts, ermine feet, and acanthus leaves. This scabbard is identical to the example I show on page 279 of my Navy Book. The carrying bands show a little minor wear to the surfaces but the detail to the overlapping oak leaves and acorns is still there. The eyelets have triple serrations, also showing some minor wear. The throat is retained by two headless brass side-screws.

The blade is a double-etched sailing ship type, as Höller products always are; Höller did not make the fouled anchor etch. This blade is still bright throughout, showing only the most minor of age. The needle-like tip is still there, and other than a couple of minor areas with some small smudges, the blade is easily in Near Mint condition. The sailing ship etch is bold and bright against the 100% gray backgrounds. The obverse features a fouled anchor in the center, above a fully rigged sailing ship that approaches the viewer over an ocean of water plants. On the reverse the fouled anchor is eliminated; there is only the ship and lots of floral decoration. The ricasso is etched with the double oval Höller logo, in the center of which is the thermometer trademark, with too many digits to ever count... Although it's actually 17 one each side, for a total of 34. The washer shows some minor wear but is intact and in place.

An excellent period Höller dagger here, giving the viewer a feeling of the time and history it has lived through.

Excellent Plus. $1,295.00

NVL12 #35602 U-9 2nd Model Naval Dagger – Unmarked Robert Klass

This 2nd Model Naval Dagger shows some usage from the period, and about 40% of the gilding remains to be seen, mostly in the recesses of the mounts. The mounts of this basically are the same I show in my Navy Book on page 355. Although this blade is unmarked it is most like the work of the Klass firm, as they were the only known producer of the U-9 motif.

The pommel and crossguard are both in excellent condition, having fine detail throughout. The pommel bears an eagle, looking to the viewer's left, with fine detail evident to the eye, beak, and half-opened wings. The bird clutches a wreath with a raised mobile swastika in his talons.

The crossguard features the fouled anchor on both sides of the center block, and has acanthus leaves that decorate the crossguards. The guards have button-style ends, with nipples at the extremities. The detail is good throughout the guard. The grip is a carved wood base, with an off-white celluloid covering. The celluloid is is a excellent condition throughout, with no cracks or breaks, and is tightly wrapped with twisted brass wire.

There is a fine, Naval-style aluminum portepee tied about the hilt in a double reef knot. This knot shows no fraying and is in perfect condition throughout. The slide and stem have the “V” woven decoration, and the lower ball has the characteristic “cat's anus” style thread stuffing. A fine hilt here.

The scabbard is the standard lightning bolt style, and is nice and straight throughout. The shell has good, strong motif stampings, featuring palmettes around the carrying bands, and crisp lightning bolts, ermine feet, and acanthus leaves adorning the lower areas. The bands are the “high-off-the-surface” variety, featuring a mix of acorns and overlapping oak leaves. The eyelets are the triple serrated type. The upper eyelet shows a little more wear than the lower eyelet, but the serrations are still all there. The throat of this example is retained by two flush-mount headless screws, one in each side.

The main attraction of this dagger is of course the blade. The blade obverse is identical to the Klass examples I show on page 365 and 357 of my Navy Book, however the etched motif is opposite the of example shown in the book. The reverse blade depicts, in a lower panel, a battleship heading dead ahead, almost directly at the viewer. The details are quite clear to the bow and superstructure of the ship, as well as to the two ensigns which are flying from the bow and the mast. The battleship is cutting through the water, throwing up a fine bow wake. Above this depiction is the fouled anchor motif, and finishing the blade off are a series of floral decorations. The obverse blade has a larger panel which depicts the U-9 submarine. The details to this submarine are extremely clear, having the designation “U-9” on the conning tower. The antenna rigging of the submarine is extremely clear, and the periscope is also visible jutting out of the conning tower. The submarine is running on the surface, cutting through the sea, with three seagulls following above and astern. The etch is extremely clear and in perfect condition. Above this panel a floral decoration that mirrors that seen on the obverse. This blade is in perfect, Mint condition and is a real beauty, having a fine, needle-like tip. The blade is protected by an in-place brown leather washer.

If you have been looking for a U-9 Dagger, this is your chance to acquire a fine, authentic example.

Excellent Plus, Plus. $5,595.00

NVL12 #36215C 2nd Model Naval Dagger – F.W. Höller

This Höller example is a fine textbook piece produced in highest quality brass construction. The pommel and crossguard are identical to the examples that I show on page 278 and 279 of my Navy Book. The Höller pommel is particularly good looking as it does have more depth to the inner wing fold than most of the other maker’s product. The detail is exceptional to the bird’s head, breast feathering, wings, talons, wreath and raised swastika. The crossguard features the fouled anchor center blocks with acanthus leaves on both sides of the quillon arms. The button ends have good engraving and the nipples at the tips stick out quite far identical to page 279. There is about 50 or 60% of the original gilding which remains on these mounts. It gives them a very nice period glow. The grip is most attractive having turned a very deep ivory-like color. This grip is of carved wood base having a celluloid covering. The celluloid is in perfect condition throughout. It is tightly wrapped with twisted brass wire. The old residue of time and dirt is still noticeable trapped by the grip wire. The scabbard is one of the seldom seen period hammered type. The gilding finish exactly matches that of the hilt parts.

The scabbard is nice and straight throughout, having good hits to the peening. The lower chape button is not hammered but remains in a smooth state. The carrying bands are the type which have straight borders typical of this firm. The bands feature overlapping oak leaves and acorns. The eyelets are the triple serrated type showing some modest wear to the surfaces. The throat is retained by two headless side screws. This scabbard is the same as the one I show in my navy book on page 281, right.

The fine blade is a double etched variety, and it is still bright throughout. It shows only the most nominal signs of age and is easily still in near full mint condition. The blade is etched with the sailing ship motif which was the only type done by the Höller firm. It features a fouled anchor in the center area of the obverse with a fully rigged sailing ship below floating on sea plants toward the viewer. The upper portion is finish with floral motif. All of the frosting remains in the backs of the etch. The reverse blade eliminates the anchor and depicts a larger sailing ship again on floral plants coming up to about the halfway point of the blade. The rest of the blade finishes with floral motif. The original tip is still needlelike. The reverse ricasso is etched with the double ovals. These ovals contain the firm’s name and location, “F.W. Höller Solingen”. Inside is the thermometer trademark having too many digits to ever count... Or seventeen on each side, if you are curious. The washer is an off-red felt type showing only nominal age.

A very nice textbook Höller Naval Dirk here.

Near Mint. $1,595.00

NVL12 #36272 2nd Model Naval Dagger – Paul Weyersberg

We don’t see many Paul Weyersberg Naval Daggers so it is a pleasure to get one in once in awhile. This examlpe is identical to the example I show on page 292 and 293 in my Navy Book. There is not much gilding left on the mounts of this dagger, only small amounts in the recesses. The pommel is the same as I show on page 293. It has good detail to the bird’s head, breast feathering, wings, talons, wreath and swastika. The pommel features the larger center block area that we usually see with this producer. Again, look at page 292 and 293, and you will see this larger center block. Both sides of the crossguards are decorated with raised acanthus leaves and the end buttons have deep accent engravings with nipples that stick out fairly far. The grip is a carved wood base having a covering of celluloid. The celluloid has turned an ivory-like color and is in perfect condition. This grip is wrapped with a thin twisted brass wire.

The scabbard is a lightning bolt variety. It is straight throughout. This scabbard is very deeply stamped featuring palmettes on either side of the carrying bands, and at the lower part are the lightning bolts, ermine feet and acanthus leaves. The scabbard is identical to the example that I show on page 292. The bands are fairly high off the surface and they feature overlapping oak leaves and acorns. The eyelets have triple serrated surfaces showing only modest wear. The throat is retained by two flatter head screws, one in each side. This scabbard has the same patina as the hilt mounts having not a lot of gilding remaining but the dull brass looks quite nice also.

The blade is a triple etched variety. It is nice and bright throughout having quality nickel-plated finish still with needlelike tip. The etch pattern is the fouled anchor variety and it has all of the frosted backgrounds. This blade appears to be in near full mint condition. The fouled anchor etch is nicely raised and is presented well with the darker frosted backgrounds. The reverse ricasso is etched with the double ovals used by this firm. The firm’s name is contained within the ovals as well as the location, “Paul Weyersberg and Co. Solingen”. In the center are is a downward pointing sword positioned between two wheat shafts. The blade buffer is a dark brown leather. A good solid example here showing signs of its carrying time but no abuse. If you are collecting naval types this is a good textbook piece to add to your assemblage.

Excellent. $1,295.00

NVL12 #35976AC 2nd Model Naval Dagger – F.W. Höller

This Höller 2nd Model Naval Dagger is a textbook piece. We don’t see many period Höller pieces anymore and I am pleased to offer this fine example. The pommel and crossguard are of high quality brass and are identical to the pictures I show in my Navy Book on pages 278 and 279. The Höller pommel is a beauty as it has deeper recesses to the inward wings than most other pommels. It also has an exceptional look to the proud bird’s head at the top complete with well detailed eye, beak and breast feathering. The half open wings are deeper recessed than normal examples giving the pommel a quality look. Because of the recessed wings the wreath which is clutched by the eagle is more vaulted outward than most others. It has a good mobile swastika in the center. The crossguards have the typical fouled anchor center block with good acanthus leaves on all four surfaces. The button ends are well hand enhanced and the nipples stick out quite far the same as page 279. The grip is a fine off-white color having a deeper toning than most. It is in perfect condition and is wrapped with the springy wire notably used by the Holler firm.

There is an aluminum portepee on this example which may or may not be original to the piece. This knot is in good unfrayed condition and tied in the double reef. The lower insert is a standard form and not the “cat’s anus” type. The scabbard is a very fine Höller hammered type. It is completely straight throughout and exactly matches the brass tones of the hilt mounts. This scabbard has the classic Höller bands which you can tell immediately as the edges are straight across at the oak leaves. These oak leaves and acorns are well detailed. The eyelets are the triple serrated style and is also a usual with Höller scabbards, the carrying rings are slightly bigger than those we see on other producers. The throat is retained by two headless brass side screws.

The blade is the “sailing ship” type and this was the only etch that we normally see on Höller naval daggers. This blade is still bright throughout and has a good needlelike tip. The etching is still nice and crisp but there is not a lot of contrast between the backgrounds and the relief points. The etch is still quite visible showing on the obverse the fouled anchor positioned over a fully rigged sailing ship. The ship is making its way toward the viewer over a bed of sea plants. On the reverse, the anchor is eliminated with the sailing ship being more centered. This blade grades at about excellent plus, plus. The reverse ricasso is etched with the double ovals containing the firm’s name and location, “F.W. Höller Solingen”. Inside is the thermometer logo having 17 individual digits on either side, for a total of 34. The brown leather blade buffer is in place.

A nice quality Höller dagger here showing some wearing signs of the period, but also having a sense of history about it.

Excellent Plus, Plus. $1,595.00

NVL12 #35968 Late 2nd Model Naval Dagger – E&F Hörster

This Hörster dagger was made late in the period reflected by the fact that the scabbard is a steel base as is the crossguard. As the war ground on there was no brass to be used for dress daggers so we begin to see the use of steel as well as a pot metal base. This example still has a brass pommel attached at the top. The pommel is a classic Hörster and is the same as I show on page 282 of my Navy Book. This pommel has excellent detail to the bird’s head, breast feathering, talons and wreathed swastika. The pommel is toned with little gilding remaining. The crossguard is a pot-metal type and it looks to me like it is possibly a generic variety as the center block eagles are bigger than the normal Hörster type. At the time this dagger was produced chances are Hörster was buying pieces from other firms just to be able to complete their orders. This crossguard has some wear to the brass plated finish revealing the gray look of the pot metal on the high spots. The detail is excellent to the fouled anchors and also to the acanthus leaves. The button ends are fine as are the nipples in the center. The release button on this example is a brass type being slightly unusual looking but definitely original. The grip is a carved wood base having an off-white celluloid covering. The celluloid is in perfect condition having good age toning. This grip is tightly wrapped with twisted brass wire.

The scabbard, as mentioned above, is a steel base. It has a brass plated finish which is about 98%. There are a couple of areas where the telltale steel can be seen through the plating but it is not bad. This scabbard is definitely a Hörster type produced from their dies. It is interesting if you look at the picture of the Hörster scabbard shown on page 283, the oak leaf bands run downward instead of upward, the case with most naval producers. This dagger also has the downward running scabbard bands. The scabbard has the lightning bolt design with good stampings to the palmettes around the bands and to the lightning bolts below along with the acanthus leaves and ermine feet. The throat is retained by two dome head screws.

Despite the lateness of this dagger’s outside, the double etched blade is a high quality beauty. This blade is completely bright throughout having choice nickel plating and retaining its needlelike tip. The fouled anchor etch is in perfect condition with fine raised portions and having all of the gray backgrounds. This blade is in mint condition. The reverse ricasso is etched with the double ovals which contain the firm’s name and location, “E&F Hörster Solingen”. In the center is a large “H” letter having two smaller letters being a “H” and “S” in the center. A downward pointing sword pierces the two smaller letters. The original brown leather buffer is in place.

A nice 2nd Model Naval Dagger here for those out there that are collecting different “types”.

Excellent Plus. $995.00

NVL12 #35793C 2nd Model Naval Dagger with Hammered Scabbard – E. & F. Hörster

This Hörster naval dagger is a very fine example showing some period wear but overall really great preservation. This piece is equipped with textbook fine brass mounts. The hilt mounts are the same as I show on page 283 and 282 of my Navy Book. The pommel does not have any gilding left to its surfaces but still retains very crisp detail to the bird’s head with great preservation to the bird’s eye, beak and breast feathers. The bird grasps a wreath in his well detailed talons which portrays a mobile swastika within. The crossguard has more gilding remaining to its surfaces being about 85-90%. This crossguard is identical to page 283. It features excellent fouled anchors on the two center blocks with well detailed acanthus leaves on the surfaces of both sides of the two quillon arms. The button ends have good cut in lines with long nipples that stuck out exactly as the book piece. The grip is a beautiful off-white celluloid over a carved wood base. This celluloid has turned about as dark as they do and therefore has a great classic look to it. The grip is in perfect condition and is tightly wrapped with twisted brass wire. It is easy to see the years of service time trapped within the ribs by the grip wire. I always like to see this on a Naval Dagger.

There is an aluminum portepee attached to this dagger which appears original-to-the-piece. This portepee is in excellent condition having a minor amount of fray just where it comes out of the naval double reef tie. Other than this the knot is in good condition. The slide and stem have the usual “V” woven designs with yarn-like bullion covering the ball with a smooth style bullion insert. A very nice hilt here.

The scabbard is also an impressive example being straight throughout and also having maybe 80-85% of the gilding. This scabbard has the extra cost peened surface. The scabbard bands are high off the surface type having excellent detail to the overlapping oak leaves and acorns. The eyelets on this piece are the larger size that we frequently see used on Hörster daggers. These eyelets are the same as the examples I show on page 284 top left. The eyelets have a sleeve on both of the edges of the opening and have good triple serrated surfaces. The throat is a neat looking example cantilevering on both sides matching the same width of the butt plate. This throat is retained by two brass dome head screws which are unturned. Attached to the ringlets are the remnants of the original hangers. The two aluminum Kriegsmarine gilded snaps are still attached but have been separated from the hardware which mounted them to the snaps. Probably this was done by the liberating veteran so that he wouldn’t have to carry home the bulk of these two straps.

The blade of this example is a real beauty being a fouled anchor style double etched motif. This blade retains its needlelike tip and has 100% of its original plated surfaces. The bright surfaces contrast nicely with the 100% gray backgrounds of the etch. These backgrounds show off the etch very nicely on this blade. This blade is in mint condition. The obverse ricasso is etched with the double oval trademark. The ovals contain the firm’s name and location, “E&F Hörster Solingen”. In the center is the large “H” letter which has a smaller “H” over an “S” in the middle being pierced by a sword. The brown leather blade buffer is in position. A very fine Hörster Naval Dagger here.

Excellent Plus, Plus. $1,595.00

NVL12 #35756 2nd Model Naval Dagger – Paul Weyersberg

Weyersberg produced Naval Daggers are quite scarce and this particular example is in excellent condition being a textbook model. The pommel and crossguard are identical to the examples that I show on page 293 of my Navy Book. Best not to look at the pommel shown on page 291, as this is not a Weyersberg pommel but rather is an Eickhorn. It was a mistake on my part and if I reprint the book you can be sure that I will replace this pommel with the correct Weyersberg type. At any rate, the pommel and crossguard are produced of fine cast mounts. This pommel has a slightly longer eagle head than most and has excellent detail to the bird’s eye, beak and breast feathering. The half open wing feathering, talons, wreath and raised mobile swastika are also excellent. The crossguard depicts the fouled anchors on both of the center blocks with good acanthus leaves. The button ends have excellent cut in lines with fairly long nipples that stick out in the center. The grip of this piece is a carved wood covered with white celluloid. The celluloid has toned nicely and it is in perfect condition throughout. This grip is tightly wrapped with twisted brass wire.

The scabbard of this example is a lightning bolt type. This scabbard is dent free and has excellent stampings to the palmettes and also to the lower lightning bolts, ermine feet and acanthus leaves. This scabbard is the same as I show on page 292, lower. The bands are identical to what is shown in the center picture on page 292. These bands depict highly detailed overlapping oak leaves and acorns. The eyelets have triple serrated surfaces showing a little bit of modest wear. There is also wear in the clearance hole caused by the carrying ring with its weight up against the inner eyelet. This kind of thing really talks to you. This dagger was obviously worn and saw service during World War II. The throat is retained by two brass headless side screws this is also identical to page 292.

The double etched blade is a nice example. This blade has quality nickel-plated surfaces with needlelike tip. The gray backgrounds are 100% showing off the fine fouled anchor etch. This blade remains in mint condition and is a beauty. The obverse ricasso is etched with the double ovals used by this firm. The ovals contain the firm’s name and location, “Paul Weyersberg & Co. Solingen”. Inside is a downward pointing sword placed between two wheat shafts. The original brown leather blade buffer is in place. A rarely seen Weyersberg naval dirk and an excellent collectible example if you are collecting naval maker “types”.

Excellent Plus, Plus. $1,495.00

NVL12 #35646 Imperial Transitional Naval Dirk with Artificial Damascus Blade

This Imperial Naval Dirk shows two periods of history, as the original owner (an Imperial Naval veteran) elected to retain his dagger through the Third Reich period. This dirk is equipped with an Imperial crossguard and the original Imperial pommel cap has been replaced with the “changeover” pommel that was introduced in 1938. This pommel has outstanding hand rendered detail to the feathering of the eagle on both sides. It also has the very deep crevices in the wings where the begin to flare outward. The pommel has a lot of patination that has built up over the years, but to me this speaks to the history the dagger. This pommel is very similar, if not identical, to the outstanding example shown in my Naval Book on page 231. The eagle of course grasps a wreath that bears a mobile swastika in the center. The claws of the eagle also have been hand enhanced. A great depiction here.

The crossguard, a mentioned above, is the original Imperial example. It has center blocks which feature fine, raised fouled anchors on both sides. The backgrounds of the center blocks have been nicely hand pebbled. The crossguards run outward, being four sided, and then end in a capstan design.

The grip is a very choice example. This grip is a real beauty, having a deeply gold-toned obverse with beautiful grains, and a lighter colored reverse, this of course indicating that this dagger has been stored upright over the years. The edges of both sides have outstanding cracks which run down the all of the ribs, giving great beauty and excitement to this grip. The grip has been wrapped with a heavier than normal twisted silver wire. There are gaps between the wire and the grip surface, as over the years the grip has shrunk, which is a completely normal happening.

Decorating the hilt if a fine Naval aluminum portepee. This portepee shows just the beginnings of a little fray at the upper loop, but the double reef tie still is in completely sound condition. The cord is the thicker type, so that there is little left of the portepee were it comes out of the tie; in fact, the slide and stem are nearly right up against the last loop of the knot. I don't know how this knot was ever tied! It is extremely difficult to tie a Naval double reef knot with an aluminum portepee with this thicker style cord, as most of you Naval collectors are doubtlessly already aware. The lower ball is also in lower condition, and also has the so-called “cat's anus” stuffing. A great looking hilt here, that really talks to you.

The scabbard is the Imperial variety, with the characteristic lightning bolt design. The stampings are still nice and crisp, featuring palmettes around the bands, with the lower portions richly appointed with lightning bolts, ermine feet and acanthus leaves. The acanthus leaves on Imperial scabbards are normally pointed, and this example is no exception. The scabbard show a little bit of carrying time here and there, but there are basically no dents. The bands are are the guilloche style. This scabbard is the same I show, in color, on page 134 (right) of my Naval Book. The throat is retained by two dome-head brass screws. A very fine scabbard here, still having a good amount of gilding finish.

As nice as the outside is on this dagger, the blade is even better! This impressive blade is in the traditional Naval geometry, with double fuller construction and a good, needle-like tip. The blade has been artificially etched with a “Small Roses” Damascus pattern. The blade shows only normal age and is still in nearly perfect condition, with no pits or problems to be seen. The obverse center area bears a raised out Imperial crown over a fouled anchor. This depiction is gilded, and does show some wear, mostly on the outer edges. The inner edges where the depiction is protected by the raised center section of the double fullers still retains most of the gilded finish. The reverse of the blade is plain, except for the etched turn-of-the-century marking of the W.K. & C. firm, being a King's head next to a knight's head, both positioned over the firm's initials. The etched blade art was also used during the Imperial period, although it is quite rare to see. This blade easily grades in Excellent Plus, Plus to Near Mint condition. It is protected by an in-place off-red leather buffer. This blade is very similar to the two artificial Damascus blades I show, in color, on pages 398 and 399 of my Navy Book.

A great example here, which is extremely rare and seldom seen today. For those out there collecting Naval variants, this example is a must. A very exciting and beautiful dagger.

Excellent Plus. $6,495.00

NVL12 #35571 2nd Model Naval Dagger – Paul Weyersberg

We do not see many Paul Weyersberg pieces, and this one is a classic example. It is identical to the piece that I show in my Naval Book on page 292.

The fine pommel is identical to the example show on page 293 of my Navy Book. These mounts are basically down to the brass, with not much gilding left, with only just a little remaining in the recesses. The pommel has a fine eagle head which looks to the viewer's left. There is full detail throughout the eye, beak, breast and wing feathering, talons, wreath and raised mobile swastika of this bird.

The crossguard also has good detail to the fouled anchor center block. Acanthus leaves decorate the surfaces of both of the crossguard arms, and they end in nipple-centered buttons.

The grip is a fine, carved wood base type, with a celluloid coating. This celluloid has nicely tones over the years, and is still in perfect condition. The grip is tightly wrapped with twisted brass wire, still having some period dirt caught between the wire and the grip ribs.

The original aluminum Naval knot is still in places, found in the original double reef tie. It is interesting to note that the Naval Officer who originally tied this knot used the slide to keep the upper loops in place. I don't remember ever seeing this in the place, but it makes for a nice touch. Other than age, this knot with its aluminum cord is still in excellent condition, with virtually no wear. The stem has the usual “V” decoration in its weave, and the lower ball is in the “cat's anus” style with a thread insert. A nice hilt here.

The scabbard is completely dent-free and exactly matches the brass tones of the hilt. The scabbard features the usual lightning bolt motif, with palmettes over and under the bands, with lightning bolts, ermine feet and acanthus leaves decorating the lower areas. The bands are relatively high off the surface, featuring overlapping oak leaves with a mix of acorns. The eyelets have the triple-serrated surfaces, showing modest, even wear. The throat is retained by two, flat-head style side screws.

The blade is a fine, double etched example, having good nickel-plated surfaces and a needle-like tip. This blade is not factory bright, but is still very presentable, easily grading in a Excellent Plus, Plus to a Near Mint state. The etch is the standard fouled anchor type, still having most of the gray backgrounds intact. The reverse ricasso is etched with the double ovals used by this firms. The double ovals contain the firm's name and location, “Paul Weyersberg & Co. / Solingen”. In the center is a downward pointing sword flank by a pair of wheat sheaves. The blade is buffered by a dark colored pebbled leather pad.

A nice Weyersberg piece here that is rarely seen in the collecting marking, and a great piece for those collecting Naval types.

Excellent. $1,295.00

NVL12 #35209 Early 1st Model Naval Dagger – WKC

This 1st Model Naval Dagger is one of the examples that were produced during the 1920's. It is pretty dirty, and deeply patinated throughout, but, if anything, I think that it gives the dagger lots of character. If you are the type of person that likes something beautiful and shiny, it would probably be best if you were to go on to the next description.

This 1st Model Dagger is very similar to the example I show on page 202 of my Navy Book. The piece pictured in the book has the same narrow crossguard, and a similar pommel. These parts are of brass base, and they have long ago lost any gilding that they may have had. In fact, the pommel and crossguard are a deep plum color, which is almost black. The pommel has good detail to the cattails and reeds, as well as the cresting waves that run around the lower perimeter. There are just hints of gold around the upper button, and a little bit around the waves here and there. The crossguard, being the narrow type, has good fouled anchor depictions on the center blocks. The acanthus leaves that decorate the crossguard arms are fairly worn, but there is still detail to them. The nipple-centered end buttons are still in good condition, with clear accent lines.

The grip is a carved wood base, being coated with celluloid. The celluloid, although still in perfect condition, is also quite dirty and speaks to the life this dagger has lived. This grip is tightly wrapped with twisted brass wire, which has also darkened to the same tone as the rest of the mounts.

The early WKC scabbard is a lightning bolt example. It has a couple of small dings to the lower end, but they are not serious enough to warrant removal. There is minor amounts of gilding remaining on the obverse scabbard, but the reverse has blackened to match the hilt mounts. The detail to the stamping is still pretty good, having palmettes over and under the carrying bands, and at the bottom there are the usual lightning bolts, ermine feet, and acanthus leaves. This early scabbard has the points on the acanthus leaves, a detail that was eliminated when the Third Reich came in (using more rounded tips) with the exception of one firm: Alcoso. Alcoso continued to use pointed acanthus leaves. The bands on this piece are the thinner type. They feature overlapping oak leaves with acorns, and are fairly “high-off-the-surface”. The eyelets have the engraved oak leaves, which is a WKC trait, on they continued into the Third Reich period. We see the engraved eyelets lots of times on hammered scabbards. The throat of this example is retained by two dome-head brass screws, one in each side.

For such an early dagger I would have expected to the sailing ship motif blade, but this one is the fouled anchor style. WKC offered both types up until about 1938, when they just went with the fouled anchor exclusively. This blade is still mostly bright throughout, and retains a needle-like tip. There are some age spots that are spread around the etched area, but they look more like stains than they do pitting, The gray backgrounds are mostly gone from this blade, but you can still see the etch quite clearly. This blade grades at Excellent. The obverse is stamped with the knight head trademark, and the knight head is the type that does have the detail in the comb, so this piece probably goes back to about 1932 or '33. Beneath the knight head the firm's initials can be seen, “WKC”. The original off-red blade buffer is still in place.

I think that this is really a neat piece. It is obviously not something for the collector looking for Near Mint to Mint items, but it does have a place in a collection where they collector is looking for reality and a testament to history. An interesting early 1st Model Naval Dirk here.

Excellent. $1495.00

NVL12 #35320C Imperial Model 1902 Naval Dirk – WKC

This fine Imperial Model 1902 Naval Dirk is of all brass construction. The pommel cap is the extra cost option, of a larger size which has the open finials at the top. This cap is a real beauty, having fine detail to the finials as well as to the orb and cross piece at the upper area. As is normally the case the cross has been squared to prevent damage to the uniform during wear. The area below the finials at the top of the pommel, is nicely checkered. The dome shaped eight sections which run around the perimeter of the pommel feature alternating crosses and Prussian eagles. Each panel has a border of beads. The crossguard is a fine imperial type having raised fouled anchors in the center blocks. The area around the anchors has been random pebbled. The quillon arms come outward from the center block being four-sided, and they end in stylized capstans. The crossguard shows only nominal wear throughout.

The grip of this example is an outstanding example. This grip is quite beautiful, having a dark golden tone on the reverse and being a lighter off-white on the obverse. The grip has fine grains throughout and there is some nice looking cracking that runs down the edges of both sides. There are no chips, however. This beautiful grip is wrapped with twisted silver wire. Setting off the looks of this fine dagger is what appears to be the original Imperial silver bullion knot. This knot has long since patinated to an appealing gold color. The knot has flecks of red and black that decorate its surfaces. The slide and stem are made up of matching silver toned bullion weave and the lower ball is of bullion. There is some old paint or something which still is clinging to the recesses of this knot but of anything it gives the dagger character. The lower stuffing consists of black and red thread. This is an exceptional hilt here!

The scabbard is also a real dandy, being a hand chased extra cost variety. This scabbard is decorated with rich floral leaves on both sides of the carrying bands. It also has matching floral engravings toward the chape area. In addition to the florals there are lightning bolts which come upward on both sides. The lower chape button also has engraved floral designs. The areas in between have been left plain and really compliment the beautiful designs. The carrying bands are also quite different from what we normally see. These bands have raised out leaves which appear to be similar to tobacco leaves. The eyelets have been hand engraved with oak leaf designs and the carrying rings have rope designs which run throughout their circumference. A beautiful scabbard here which shows some modest carrying time but no denting. On the reverse of the scabbard the monogram of the original owner is professionally engraved. It has quite a bit of wear across the engraving but it appears to be possibly, “IK”. The throat of this example is retained by flush mount screws which seem to have been finished to almost disappear from the scabbard.

The blade of this example is a fine hand forged Damascus. It is in the “maiden hair” style. The blade shows some general age and wear but there is no pitting or rust. This beautiful blade has an outstanding maiden hair pattern. The blade is constructed with double fullers still having good needlelike tip. The upper spine of the ricasso is stamped with the distributor, “A. Luneburg, Kiel”. The ricasso is stamped with the small knighthead trademark used around the turn of the century. There is a fine off-red felt buffer.

This is a fine opportunity to acquire a rapidly disappearing type of Imperial Naval Dirk, one with all the extras!

Excellent Plus, Plus. $4,495.00

NVL12 #35272 2nd Model Naval Dagger – Paul Weyersberg

This 2nd Model Naval Dagger is a later wartime produced example. We can tell this as the hilt mounts appear to be the pot metal based type rather than brass. The way to tell this is that the gilded finish is just not as bright as it would normally be over brass. The good part though is that all of the finish is still there with no wear spots. The pommel and crossguard are identical to the examples I show on page 291 and 292 of my Navy Book. The pommel has excellent detail to the bird’s head, breast feathering, half open wing feathering, talons, wreath and mobile enclosed swastika. The crossguard features fouled anchor depictions in the center blocks. The center blocks are slightly bigger than most that we see and can easily be mistaken for Eickhorn until you put the pieces next to each other. The acanthus leaves have good detail on the quillon surfaces of both sides and the quillon ends are in excellent shape with their button formation and nippled tips. The carved wood grip is coated with celluloid. The celluloid is in perfect condition throughout and is tightly wrapped with twisted brass wire. A good wartime hilt here!

The scabbard is an interesting example which appears to be the same as the piece that I show on page 292 of my Navy Book. It is a lightning bolt variety being straight throughout. This scabbard is made of all brass. The engravings throughout the scabbard are excellent to include the palmettes which appear over and under the carrying bands, as well as the lightning bolts, ermine feet and acanthus leaves which are stamped below. The carrying bands have excellent detail to the overlapping oak leaves and the eyelets are the triple serrated type and have the small sleeves in each of the openings similar to the Alcoso look. The throat is retained by two brass dome head screws.

The double etched blade features the fouled anchor scenes and it is still bright throughout with needlelike tip. This blade shows just the slightest bit of age in the surfaces but it is not bad still rating in near mint condition. There are a couple of scratches on the reverse ricasso near the blade release lock but otherwise the blade is nice and clean. The obverse ricasso is etched with the dual ovals used by this firm. The ovals enclose the firm’s name and location, “Paul Weyersberg Solingen”. Inside is a downward pointing sword placed between two wheat shafts. The original off-red felt buffer shows some mild wear around the edges only.

A fairly rare maker and also a fine example for those out there collecting “types” as we rarely see wartime produced Weyersberg pieces.

Excellent. $1,195.00

NVL12 #35262 2nd Model Naval Dagger – F.W. Höller

This Höller 2nd Model Naval Dagger has classic Höller hilt mounts identical to the examples I show in my Navy Book on page 378 and 379. The Höller pommel is slightly smaller and more delicate than most of them that we see. This gives a good look to the eagle which has full details to his head, breast feathering, wing feathering, talons, wreath and mobile swastika. The crossguard features the standard fouled anchors on both sides of the center blocks. The quillon arms have good detailing to the acanthus leaves on both sides. The button ends have good accent lines and fairly large nipples at the tip, the same as page 279.

The grip is a carved wood base having a celluloid covering. The celluloid has nicely age toned and has a small crack in the obverse upper rib. There is no material missing and the crack is quite nominal and would mostly cover should there be an additional portepee put onto this piece. This grip is tightly wrapped with a copper springy wire typical of this firm. The scabbard is straight throughout. This scabbard has a hammered finish and is the style that is equipped with the very large eyelets. These scabbards, in my opinion, were a generic variety and we see them used on other producers such as Hörster and Weyersberg. This scabbard has a plain chape button at the bottom. The carrying bands have good overlapping oak leaves and acorns showing some modest surface wear. The triple serrations to the eyelets also show some wear but the serrations are all there. The throat is retained by two dome head brass side screws.

As is always the case with Höller daggers the blade etch features the sailing ship motif. This blade shows some mild smudging in places and is just the slightest bit gray. The edges are still good though and it is easy to see the sailing ships on both sides with their fully rigged sails and flying ensigns. This blade rates at about Excellent Plus. The reverse ricasso is matching etched with the double ovals used by this firm. The ovals contain the firm’s name and location, “F.W. Höller Solingen”. Inside is the classic thermometer logo, having a total of 34 tiny temperature gradiations. The original brown leather blade washer is in place.

A good dagger here, showing wear of the time, but still being in excellent, collectible condition.

Excellent Plus. $1,195.00

NVL12 #35306C 2nd Model Naval Dagger – Adolf Braun (Alcoso)

This Adolf Braun marked 2nd Model Naval Dagger was produced by Alcoso and sold to Braun, who was a distributor in Berlin. This dagger is identical to the example I show in my my Navy Book on page 301. Since the dagger was produced by the Alcoso firm it is made of all classic Alcoso mounts. The pommel and crossguard are identical to the examples I show in my navy book on page 295 and also on page 301. The mounts are all in a patinated brass having a dull look throughout. The pommel shows good detail to the bird’s head, breast feathering, half open wings, talons, wreath and mobile swastika. The crossguard is the type that has the square quillon ends the same as I show on page 297. On the Alcoso crossguards the fouled anchor motif in the center block is only shown on the obverse. On the reverse Alcoso portrayed a diamond in the center having floral decoration around the diamond. This is a carry over from the old Imperial times.

The grip is a carved wood base having celluloid covering. Unfortunately there is a couple of cracks at the top rib of the grip but they are not bad and there is no material missing. The rest of the grip is in fine condition and is tightly wrapped with a brass springy style wire. There is an original to the piece nylon portepee still in place about the hilt tied in the naval wreath knot. This portepee shows a little bit of fray on the top of the knot but the rest of it is still in good condition. The knot has turned a pleasing gold color. The slide and stem have the “V” style decorations in the motif. The lower ball also has turned a fine gold color and the “cat’s anus” style stuffing contrasts slightly as it is a lighter color than the nylon thread of the ball. Not a bad looking hilt here.

The scabbard is a typical Alcoso type. It is a lightning bolt variety having good stamping to the palmettes above and below the carrying bands as well as to the lightning bolts, ermine feet and acanthus leaves at the bottom. The acanthus leaves on Alcoso scabbards have pointed tips which is also a carryover from the imperial period. You can see this scabbard type on page 301. The bands are in good condition throughout featuring overlapping oak leaves and acorns. The eyelets are the triple serrated type which still have good detail and they feature the sleeves on each of the openings, typical of Alcoso and the same as is pictured on page 299. this fine straight scabbard has a throat that is retained by two brass side screws. The blade is a plain type having dual fuller construction. I believe that all of the other Braun stamped pieces I’ve seen in the past also were plain. The blade is in fine bright condition having needle-like tip. On the reverse it is stamped horizontally, “Adolf Braun / Berlin”. The original off-red felt blade buffer is in place, showing some minor wear to the edges.

A rarely seen dagger here and a “must” for those out there that are collecting “type” Naval dirks.

Excellent Plus. $1,395.00

NVL12 #35076 2nd Model Naval Dagger - WKC

This second model naval dagger is in "as found" condition, appearing to have never been cleaned since the War. If you are the type of individual that gets a real "feel" for things like this, it is a great dagger for you. This dagger is a textbook W.K.C. example, being the same as I show in my Navy Book on page 270. The all-brass fittings have a deep patination throughout. They are slightly dull, but it appears to me that if they were cleaned, they would come up much brighter, as there still appears to be quite a bit of gilding beneath the dirt.

The pommel is in excellent shape, having fine detail to the bird's head, breast feathering, wing feathering, talons, wreath, and mobile swastika. The crossguard is an excellent example, showing some minor usage, but still good detail to the fouled anchors, acanthus leaves, on both sides of the quillon arms, and to the buttons with their engravings around the circumference. The grip is a carved wood base, having good celluloid covering. This celluloid has turned to a slightly darker tone, still being in perfect condition. It is tightly wrapped with twisted, brass wire. The wire has trapped lots of original residue between the ribs.

There is also an original-to-the-piece aluminum portepee. This portepee is set in the original double reef knot. There is some fraying to the knot on the back of the loop, as well as the back of the lower loop. The knot also frayed where it comes out of the cord. There is some wire twisted around the bottom section of the cord, between the slide and stem. This wire was put in place to keep the ball from breaking off of the cord. It looks to me as though this wire repair job was done during the period. The lower stem and ball are in good shape, with an insert of flat style bullion. An interesting, original, untouched hilt here.

The scabbard is is the lightning bolt style. It is straight throughout, and it is the same as I show on page 271. This scabbard has good stampings to the palmettes around the bands, the lightning bolts, the ermine feet, and also to the acanthus leaves below. The scabbard is straight throughout, and has good, high-off-the-surface bands. These bands have good, overlapping, leaves and acorn mix. The eyelets are the triple serrated type, showing some wear to the surfaces. The blade is a double etched example, having outstanding, nickel plated finish. The backgrounds behind the etch are 100%, and this blade grades in mint condition, still having its needle-like tip. The obverse ricasso is deeply stamped with the knighthead trademark. The firm's initials are stamped below, "W.K.C.". The blade is protected by the in-place, original, off-red, felt buffer. A good dagger here, for those of you out there that prefer the untouched, uncleaned look.

Excellent Plus. $1,295.00

NVL12 #31687 2nd Model Naval Dagger – WKC

This fine example has some very interesting aspects about it and is of highest quality production. The hilt parts are of all brass construction having an excellent gilded finish. In fact, the finish is still 80-85% throughout. The pommel is one of the 1938 “change over” types and is identical to the example I show in my Navy Book page 229, right. This pommel is a real beauty having highly vaulted wreath with gilded swastika in the center and a very nice deep curl to the half open eagle’s wings. This pommel shows little wear and would have been a replacement for the early round ball pommel that existed on this dagger when it was first produced. The crossguard is a typical WKC example looking about the same as the one shown on page 274, center. The detail to the crossguard is still outstanding showing little to no wear. The center block anchors are nicely displayed as are the raised acanthus leaves on both sides of the crossguards. The end buttons are also still relatively crisp.

The grip of this example is an appealing off-white color. It is in perfect condition throughout being a celluloid coating over a wood base. This grip is tightly wrapped with twisted brass wire. The aluminum portepee is nicely set in place and appears to have been on the dagger a long time. This portepee is in excellent condition showing only age but no fraying.

The scabbard is also a fine desirable example. This scabbard is of solid brass construction having fine hammered surfaces. It too is an earlier form but is basically the same as the types made during the later 1930s the exception being the bands are slightly more narrow than the later types. These bands though are high off the surface depicting fine overlapping oak leaves and acorns. There is some mild wear to the bands but not bad. It is also interesting to note that the eyelets have had hand engraving to replicate oak leaves in their surfaces. This was a trait that is commonly seen on hammered scabbards by WKC. This scabbard looks nearly identical to the example shown on page 215 of my Navy Book. The scabbard is straight throughout with the exception of just the tiniest carrying hit at the bottom just above the button end. It is nothing however. The rings on this example are plain and the throat is retained by fine brass screws which are located fairly low down.

The blade is a double etched sailing ship variety still being nice and bright throughout. The sailing ship etch is all there but it is starting to thin a little and is a bit difficult to see as the frosting is mostly gone from the backgrounds. Remember, this is an old blade that probably was wiped off many times by its original carrier as well as others who have owned the dagger after the war. The blade though still grades easily at excellent plus condition. It has a fine needlelike tip and the obverse ricasso is stamped with the knighthead logo. The logo is positioned over the firm’s initials, “WKC”. The original off-red felt buffer is in place.

This is a very nice early WKC dagger which was probably originally produced about 1933 to 1935. It was worn by its owner with its original ball top pommel until that was replaced in 1938 with the eagle and swastika. This dagger shows a lot of nautical history here and is in very fine collectible condition. A great dagger here for those who know naval pieces and enjoy studying all their attributes.

Excellent Plus. $2,295.00

NVL12 #31717 2nd Model Naval Dagger – Carl Eickhorn

This Eickhorn 2nd Model Naval Dagger is in excellent condition, showing signs of wear during the period but still being in very collectible condition. The pommel and cross guard are textbook Eickhorn types, being identical to the examples I show on pages 263 and 266 of my Navy Book. The brass based mounts have fairly good gilding throughout. The pommel has approximately 50% - 60% of the gilding and the cross guard has slightly more gilding. The pommel has excellent detail to the eagle’s head, breast feathering, wing feathering, talons, wreath and swastika. The crossguard has the usual fouled anchor center blocks with good acanthus leaves throughout the quillon arms. The end buttons are well done.

The grip is an off-white celluloid over wood base. It is in perfect condition throughout and it is tightly wrapped with twisted brass wire. The scabbard that is with this example appears to be possibly a Hörster. It is identical to the example that I show on page 285. This dagger was purchased from a Vet family so that the dagger has always been this way since it came back from the war.

This scabbard is an all brass example having fine hammering to the surfaces. The scabbard is nice and straight and the lower chape button has been left plain. The bands are the higher off-the-surface type and they show some wear to the oak leaves and acorn mix but the detail is still there. The eyelets are the smooth type, exactly like the piece shown on page 285. The throat is the thicker type having a fairly good cantilever over all sides. This throat is retained by two brass dome head screws. The scabbard still has about 20% - 25% of the original gilding. It is still clinging in the areas protected by the bands and the throat and there are also smatterings of gilding here and there on the surfaces. A fine scabbard here.

The blade is a choice double-etched example having good, bright nickel plating. There are some very small age spots in some of the frosting but they are only in the form of minor discoloration, not pits. The fouled anchor etches are still bright and very prominent on the blade. The blade easily rates at excellent plus to near mint. The reverse ricasso is stamped with the over-the-shoulder trademark. The blade is protected by the original tan felt washer. This washer shows some breakdown on one side and the other side shows minor age but it is still basically all there.

A nice hammered scabbard with double etch blade here for a reasonable price. If you are looking for one that has seen wartime experience but still will look nice in your collection, this one should fit the bill.

Excellent Plus. $1,595.00

NVL12 #35004C Early 2nd Model Naval Dagger – Alcoso

This early Alcoso produced example has a scabbard that is fitted with the reef knot bands being identical to the example I show in my Navy Book on page 296. The hilt mounts of this example are in excellent condition having some of the original gilding still remaining in the recesses but mostly they are down to the brass. These mounts appear to be the generic type that was used by Weyersberg, Clemen & Jung, Klaas and others. These mounts are identical to the examples I show on page 293. The eagle is of excellent design having good detail to the features and also to the wreath with mobile swastika. The crossguard has the typical fouled anchors with good detail to the acanthus leaves and button ends. The nipples at the end are the same as is shown on page 293. It is also interesting to note that the blade release button used on this piece is the “drilled” type not the usual “notched” type. The grip is a fine off-white example still being in perfect condition and having tightly twisted brass wire. There is lots of old dirt and residue trapped by the wire in between the ribs.

Setting off the hilt of this dirk is the original aluminum portepee. This portepee is the style with wide cord and it remains in the naval tie. Unfortunately there is some fraying where the cords come out of the naval tie but it is still strong and not apt to break. The slide and stem below are the typical “V” decorated type with a bullion ball at the bottom and the “cat’s anus” style insert. This dagger does not appear to have ever been apart.

The scabbard as noted above is the style with reef knot bands on the obverse and regular rope design on the reverse as well as the eyelets. The scabbard motif is the lightning bolt variety. There is some gold remaining here and there in the recesses which exactly matches the gilding finish to the hilt, crossguard and butt plate. The palmettes are deeply stamped as are the lightning bolts, ermine feet and the pointed acanthus leaves at the bottom. This is all typical Alcoso workmanship here. The throat is retained by two dome head brass screws.

The double etched blade is a choice sailing ship variety. The details to the blade etch are excellent with all of the frosting behind it. The blade features an anchor in the center of the obverse with a sailing ship below making its way over some sea plants. At the upper portion are floral designs. The reverse blade is similar except that there is no anchor and the sailing ship is larger. The details are outstanding and you can even see all of the mast lines as well as the ensigns flying. This blade has its original needlelike tip and is in mint condition. The reverse ricasso is stamped with the Alcoso trademark used from 1937 through 1939. It features the scales having the firm’s initials “ACS” interspersed and above the scales in an arch shape is the firm’s block lettered name, “Alcoso” and below the location city of “Solingen”. The original red felt blade buffer is in place. This is an outstanding untouched naval dirk here by a fairly rare maker and has never been apart. A fine acquisition for a serious naval collector.

Excellent Plus, Plus. $1,995.00

NVL12 #34894 2nd Model Naval Dagger – Carl Eickhorn

This 2nd Model Naval Dagger shows some wear from the period but overall it is still in good collectible condition. The hilt mounts are textbook Eickhorn being identical to the examples I show in my Navy Book on pages 263 and 266. The pommel and crossguard have about 50-60% of the original gilding, mostly in the recesses. The pommel has excellent detail to the bird’s head which is positioned to the viewer’s left. Beneath are excellent breast feathering, talons, wreath and raised swastika within the wreath. The crossguard is the standard type with fouled anchors in the center blocks. The acanthus leaves on the quillon arms are nicely detailed as are the button ends.

The grip is a carved wood base which is coated with off-white celluloid. The celluloid remains in perfect condition and is wrapped with twisted brass wire. The original-to-the-piece nylon portepee is stillinI place in the naval tie. The portepee shows some age and has toned to a golden color. There is only just the slightest start of fray at the cord position under the crossguard but it is nothing. The slide and stem have the “V” designs woven into their surfaces. The lower ball has the yarn-like nylon covering and the insert is the “cat’s anus” type. An extremely nice hilt here!

The lightning bolt scabbard nicely matches with the same amount of gilding remaining as the hilt mounts. This lightning bolt scabbard shows some carrying time and there are just slight indentations in the lower portion of the scabbard but they are really not dense. The lightning bolt pattern is deeply struck featuring palmettes over and under the carrying bands and at the lower portion lightning bolts, ermine feet and acanthus leaves. The scabbard is the same as page 266 in my navy book. The bands are still crisp featuring overlapping oak leaves and acorns. The eyelets have the triple serrated surfaces showing only nominal wear. The throat is retained by two brass dome head side screws.

The blade is a really nice double etched type having needlelike tip. The nautical scenes are beautifully done with full 100% o the gray backgrounds remaining. A great looking blade here which is in mint condition. The reverse ricasso is stamped with the post 41 Eickhorn squirrel. This squirrel is the “over-the-shoulder” type and is the same as page 266. Beneath the squirrel are the three words, “Original / Eickhorn / Solingen”. The original brown felt blade buffer is in place. A nice dagger here which gives a feeling of the period with its wear but still retains great collectability with its condition.

Excellent Plus, Plus. $1,395.00

NVL12 #34725C Imperial Model 1890 Naval Long Dirk Converted to Model 1921

This Imperial Naval Dirk is basically the same as the example I show on page 51 of my Navy Book. There is one main difference though, and that is the fact that the finials have been removed from the pommel. The reason for this is so that the dagger could somewhat conform to the 1919 model, that was produced after the abdication of the Kaiser and the losing of WWI. In other words, the original owner of this dagger served in the Imperial Navy, and once the war was lost, and there no longer was a Kaiser, rather than purchase a new dagger, this officer had the pommel finials removed, making it no longer an Imperial crown type. The job of removal was quite well done, having the area completely checkered and pebbled. In fact, if you did not know that this pommel used to have finials on the top, you would probably not realize it.

The original eight separate panels still are there, however, and they depict the Prussian eagle, and alternating eagle on each one. This pommel has a screw which keeps it tight against the blade tang. Nothing was done to the crossguard, and this guard is still its original Imperial type. It features fouled anchors in the center blocks of both sides. The backgrounds of the anchors have been heavily random pebbled. The quillon arms are four sided and they extend outward to capstan ends.

The grip is a very fine example. It has a very beautiful color tone, being a gold hue on the obverse, and slightly lighter on the reverse. There are also some attractive grains that run in the surfaces. There is one crack, which is on the reverse, extending from the center part, down to the bottom of the grip. Cracks like this are expected, and by no means do they detract from the beauty or value. The grip is wrapped with heavy, twisted, silver wire. It is also interesting to note that apparently the blade button release which on these daggers was a two part example, became separated, and the upper section was lost to time. This did not bother the original owner, as he merely substituted a screw, which does the same job.

The scabbard is the long type, having a lightning bolt pattern. This scabbard shows quite a bit of usage over the years, having a number of mild dings in the surfaces, and a few hits to the lower edge. There are palmettes above and below the band, and further down are the upward pointing lightning bolts, ermine feet, and acanthus leaves. The bands are the Guilloche style, meaning that they simulate ropes wrapped around pilings. The detail to the rope-like design is still fairly crisp. The eyelets are plain. The reverse of the scabbard throat area also has the name engraved of the original owner. Unfortunately, the wear to the engraving has left some of the letters indiscernable, so that I am not able to tell you what the name is. Perhaps someone with a real good eye and a loupe could figure this one out. The throat is retained by two small dome head side screws.

The long style blade is the Imperial type with the center ridge, and double edged feature. In order to conform with the "No Imperial" theme, the original wearer also had the etch buffed off this blade. Since the etch had the Imperial crown, it was also offensive at the time. There are very slight traces of the original etch still there if you look close, but at first glance the blade has the appearance of being plain. The condition of the blade is still fairly good, having a needle-like tip. The blade has its original off-red buffer, of which a portion is missing from the right side.

Overall a most interesting dagger here, for those of you who understand some of the transitions that went along with Naval service. Obviously, times were tough, and officers were not about to discard or throw away a good dagger, just because the new example was not like the old example. We see over and over, many instances where daggers have been altered to suit the new fashion. This is the first example of this type that I have seen, and I must say, it is extremely interesting and fascinating to me. I hope someone else out there will also admire this piece of history, which reflects the period from 1890-1921.

Excellent. $2,195.00

NVL12 #34380 2nd Model Naval Dagger - Carl Eickhorn

This 2nd Model Naval Dagger is in choice condition, there is at least 95-98% of the original gilding on the hilt mounts, as well as the scabbard. A nice dagger here! The pommel and crossguard are textbook Eickhorn examples, being the same as I show on pages 263 and 266 of my Navy Book. The pommel is a beauty, having excellent detail to the bird's head, feathering, talons, wreath, and swastika in the center. The gilding is only worn a little bit on the ends of the half-folded wings. The crossguard also has almost all of the gilding, with only a little bit of brass showing through on the left quillon end. The rest of the guard is in choice gilded condition, to include the fouled anchor center blocks, the acanthus leaves on the quillon arms, and the button ends.

The grip is a fine, carved wood, having an off-white, celluloid covering. The celluloid is in perfect condition, and has toned to a pleasing hue. This perfect conditioned grip is tightly wrapped with twisted brass wire. The scabbard is a lightning bolt type, that appears to have nearly all of its gilding. There is one spot at the lower portion of the obverse, where the gilding has either worn off, or perhaps came off from some liquid or other material that sat on the space. It is not bad though, and if anything, gives the dagger charachter. You will always be able to identify your dagger by this particular spot! The rest of the scabbard is a beauty, having great stamping to the palmettes around the carrying bands, and also to the lightning bolts, ermine feet, and acanthus leaves. The bands are the overlapping oak leaves and acorns, showing little to no wear. The eyelets have good, crisp, triple serrations. There is still quite a bit of the original gilding left on the hanging rings. The throat is retained by two dome head brass screws.

As we would hope, the blade is still in nice condition. This blade has a good, bright finish throughout, being nickel plated. The obverse tip is in nice condition, and the reverse tip shows just a little bit of scuffing, where apparently there was a small pit or something removed, but it is hardly noticeable. Other than this, the blade is in choice, mint condition, having fine, fouled anchor etch, with all of the gray in the backgrounds. This fine blade is stamped with the 1935-41 squirrel. The tan felt blade buffer is in place.

A very nice navy dagger here, which should fit into most collections without a problem.

Mint Minus. $1,395.00

NVL12 #34417 2nd Model Naval Dagger - WKC

This 2nd Model Naval example shows some wear and usage of the period. It is a textbook WKC example, having the same pommel crossguard and scabbard as I show in my Navy Book on page 269-271. The pommel and crossguard do not have any gild remaining on the surfaces, having a rich, patinated brass finish. The details though, are still fairly good, to include a fine eagle head pommel, with good breast feathering, wreath, and swastika. The crossguard still has good detail to the fouled anchor center blocks, with good acanthus leaves on the crossguard and button ends.

The grip is a carved wood base, having celluloid covering. The covering is in excellent condition, except for a small spot at the upper reverse rib, where there is a hairline crack. It does not appear to be threatening, and I doubt that it will proceed further. Other than this, the grip is in perfect condition, being slightly darker on the reverse. This grip is tightly wrapped with twisted brass wire. The scabbard is straight throughout, being the lightning bolt type. It also is down to the brass, with no visible gilding.

The scabbard has the "high-off-the-surface" style carrying bands. These bands are still quite crisp, featuring overlapping oak leaves and acorns. The eyelets are triple serrated. The scabbard has good detail to the palmettes around the bands, and at the lower portion to the lightning bolts, the ermine feet, and the acanthus leaves at the lower. The throat is retained by two dome head brass screws.

The blade of this example is a fouled anchor type. Although it is still in nice condition with a very fine, fouled anchor etch, the surfaces have just started to turn slightly gray from age. Other than this though, the blade is in fine condition, easily rating at excellent plus. The obverse ricasso is stamped with the knight head logo with the firm's initials below, "WKC". The original off-red, felt buffer is still in place.

A good, strong, basic naval dagger here, and a great example for someone just getting started, or for someone on a budget.

Excellent. $995.00

NVL12 #34272 2nd Model Naval Dagger - Carl Eickhorn

This 2nd Model Naval Dagger has signs of age throughout, but no abuse anywhere. The gilding is mostly worn off the hilt parts, but there are some areas where there is lots of gilding remaining in the recesses. The hilt is a textbook Eickhorn example, being identical to the pommel I show in my Navy Book on page 263. The details are still outstanding to the pommel's head, breast feathering, and curved wings. The talons retain a vaulted wreath with a mobile swastika inside. The crossguard is identical to the example I show on page 266. It features a good, crisp, fouled anchor in both of the center blocks, and good acanthus leaves on the front and reverse of both crossguards. The end buttons show little wear with good accent lines running around. The nipples show slight wear to the edges. The grip is a fine, off white example being a carved base with celluloid covering. The celluloid is in perfect condition, and it is tightly wrapped with twisted brass wire.

The scabbard is straight throughout, and like the hilt has some age to the surfaces. About 30% of the gilding remains, and in the area where the gilding has worn off, the brass mounts have turned to a pleasing "plum" color. I like this type of patination, and I am sure if you do, you will like this scabbard. The throat fitting as well as the butt fitting below the crossguard have also turned plum. The scabbard is deeply stamped, having palmets around the bands, and the lower section has the lightning bolts with ermine feet, and acanthus leaves, the same as page 266. The bands have the overlapping oak leaves and acorns, showing little wear. The eyelets are finished with triple serrated edges. The throat is retained by two dome head brass side screws.

The blade is a real pleasure to gaze upon, as it comes out of this patinated scabbard. This blade remains in full mint condition, having high quality nickel finish. The needle like tip is still there, and 100% of the frosting remains around the raised, fouled anchor etch. This mint blade is stamped on the reverse ricasso with the 1935-41 squirrel trademark. The tan felt blade buffer is in place.

A fine example here for someone who is looking for a dagger that has signs of being carried through the war, but no abuse.

Excellent. $1,195.00

NVL12 #34053 2nd Model Naval Dagger – Carl Eickhorn

This Eickhorn 2nd Model Naval Dagger is completely textbook throughout. The pommel has a mild amount of patina on the sections where the gilding has worn to the brass. The detail though is still all there to the bird’s head, breast feathering, talons, wreath and mobile swastika. The gilding on the pommel is maybe 40-50%. The crossguard has much more gilded finish being at about 90%. This crossguard has excellent detail to the center block fouled anchors, the acanthus leaves on the crossguard arms and to the button ends having good deep accent grooves around the circumference. The grip is an off-white example being a carved wood base with celluloid covering. The grip is tightly wrapped with twisted brass wire. This grip has no cracks or any problems.

The scabbard shell is the lightning bolt type. It is completely straight throughout and has excellent remaining gilding. The gilding is slightly worn on the left edge and also in the reverse areas between the bands. The rest of the gilding is still intact being nearly 100% on the obverse. This scabbard has fine carrying bands consisting of overlapping oak leaves with acorn mix. There is little wear to these bands. The eyelets are also in excellent condition. The throat of this example is retained by two dome head brass side screws.

The blade of this piece is about as nice as you will see. It has high quality nickel-plated surfaces which still have an outstanding mirror finish. The double etched blade features the fouled anchor motif. The anchors are in the center area with a floral design above. Below the anchor is an additional anchor which features two serpents twisted around the shaft. The background of the etch remains at 100%. This blade is in mint condition. The reverse ricasso is stamped with the 1935-41 squirrel trademark. This trademark features a sword carrying a downward pointing sword. Above the animal is the word “original” and below is the name of the firm and the location, “Eickhorn Solingen”. The original brown felt buffer is in place.

A nice solid dagger here.

Excellent Plus. $1,395.00

NVL12 #33691 2nd Model Naval Dagger – Carl Eickhorn

This Naval Dagger is a complete textbook Eickhorn recently purchased from the family of a veteran. This dagger has never been in a collection. The dagger is in very fine condition throughout. There is a slight amount of age that has set upon the lower portion of the pommel but this should be not a problem to the next purchaser if he wanted to clean this residue. The pommel appears to still have about 60-70% of the original gilding. It is the same as the examples I show in my Navy Book on page 263 through page 266. The pommel has good detail to the bird’s head, breast feathering, wing feathering, talons, wreath and raised swastika. The classic crossguard features the fouled anchor center block on each side and also has quillon arms which have raised acanthus leaf decoration. The button ends have good engraving throughout their surfaces with nipples at the tips.

The grip is an off-white color and is in perfect condition throughout. This grip is a celluloid over carved wood base. It is tightly wrapped with twisted brass wire. There is some age residue noticeable around the wire wrap which gives a nice feeling of the period to the piece. The dagger also has its original aluminum portepee. This portepee is completely set in place and is in good condition throughout with just a slight amount of wear showing at the top loop area. The original carrier apparently did not look at the instructions when it came time to properly tie his portepee. This portepee is not correct but studying the set-in-place condition, I am sure that it has not been moved since the period. The slide and stem have the usual “V” weave and the lower ball is produced of a yarn-like style bullion. The insert is the “cat’s anus” type typical of portepees designated for the Navy.

The scabbard is a classic lightning bolt type. It is the same as I show on page 266 of my Navy Book. This scabbard has easily about 85-90% of the original gilding showing only a little bit of hand wear on the reverse area between the two bands. The scabbard motif has the palmettes around both carrying bands and at the lower side there are lightning bolts, ermine feet and acanthus leaves. This scabbard is straight as an arrow. The carrying bands are nicely detailed overlapping oak leaves with acorns. There is little to no wear to these bands. The eyelets have the usual triple serrated surfaces showing only modest wear. The throat is contained by two dome head brass side screws.

The double etched blade is about as fine as you will see. The nickel plating is completely bright with a fine raised double etch. This blade is easily in mint condition. The etch panels have 100% of the gray backgrounds and the etch features a fouled anchor in the center on both sides as well as sea plants at the upper portion, and at the lower portion the sea plant resembling a raised sun followed by a fouled anchor having two serpents wrapped around its shaft. The reverse ricasso has the post 1941 trademark consisting of the “Over-the-Shoulder” squirrel. Beneath the animal are the three words, “original / Eickhorn / Solingen”. The original tan felt blade washer is in place showing only a little age but no wear.

A very nice, untouched naval dagger here directly from the veteran family.

Excellent Plus, Plus. $1,495.00